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Sailing on the Silver Screen: Hollywood and the U.S. Navy (Lawrence Suid)

Suid, Lawrence - Sailing on the Silver ScreenFor most of the past ninety years the American film industry and the U.S. Navy have worked  together to their mutual benefit. Hollywood used the Navy to obtain – at little or no cost – personnel, equipment, and locations for movies filled with adventure, romance, and drama. In turn, the Navy obtained – at little or no cost – a positive public image that boosted both its recruiting efforts and its relations with Congress. The Vietnam War effectively disrupted this pattern of cooperation, but, as this study of the Navy’s interaction with filmmakers shows, movies like The Right Stuff re-established the Navy’s favorable image on the silver screen.

The author provides a fully documented history of the making of the Navy’s image on film from the movie industry’s earliest days. He goes behind the scenes for deliberations about the potential impact of certain movies on both the military and civilians, and examines the ripple effect of such watershed films as Top Gun, a movie that initially gave the Navy a needed post-Vietnam boost. However, when the Tailhook scandal erupted and the conduct of some aviators was attributed to the “flyboy” image projected in the movie, Top Gun became a liability.

Lawrence Suid’s inside revelations about the Navy’s cinematic input range from pre-World War I to post-Cold War. More than 100 films, as varied as Annapolis and Hunt for Red October, are analyzed for their portrayal of the Navy. The book’s focus is on feature films, but relevant documentaries and made-for-television movies are also discussed. Suid draws on original documents from the Department of Defense, National Archives, and private collections, and from interviews with more than 100 filmmakers, naval officers, and government officials.

LAWRENCE SUID is the author of Guts & Glory: Great American War Movies, Film and Propaganda in America: A Documentary History, and numerous other publications on military and film history. A frequent lecturer, he has served as a consultant to the PBS series Vietnam: A Television History and provided commentary for such television news shows as 20/20. He holds a Ph.D. in American Studies from Case Western Reverse University and currently resides in Washington, D.C.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 307 pp., index – Dimensions 26 x 18 cm (10,2 x 7,1 inch) – Weight 832 g (29,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Naval Institute Press, Anapolis, Maryland, 1996 – ISBN 1-55750-787-2

The Saint: ‘So you’re the famous Simon Templar!’ (Tony Mechele, Dick Fiddy)

Mechele, Tony - The SaintA sixtieth anniversary review of the life and times of one of fiction and television’s most ageless and debonair heroes, written with full access to the official archives. From his 1929 debut in book form, his previous incarnations in The Saint and The Return of the Saint right up to his latest reappearance in the new series.

Includes all feature films and television episodes with the entire cast, the year of its release / TV premiere, synopsis and which story or novel the feature or TV episode was based on.

TONY MECHELLE is a TV historian and researcher. DICK FIDDY is a TV scriptwriter and feature writer. They are both on the editorial board of Primetime and are long-standing fans of The Saint.

Softcover – 176 pp., index – Dimensions 28 x 20 cm (11 x 7,9 inch) – Weight 534 g (18,8 oz) – PUBLISHER Boxtree Ltd., London, 1989 – ISBN 1-85283-259-2

The Salad Days: An Autobiography (Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.)

fairbanks-jr-douglas-my-salad-daysRaconteur, bon vivant, actor and diplomat, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., is an American Prince of Wales. Born into a distinguished circle of movie greats, he became a prince of the Silver Screen, a legend of Hollywood’s golden age. His glittering lifestyle has taken him into the world of privilege and power and his many leading ladies – both on and off the screen – have included Joan Crawford, Marlene Dietrich, Vera Zorina, Gertrude Lawrence, Rita Hayworth and Katharine Hepburn. In The Salad Days Fairbanks paints a self-portrait that shines with wit, warmth, candour and charm.

The Salad Days recreates a time and place that will never be seen again. Here we find father Douglas Fairbanks, Sr., and other screen legends such as Charlie Chaplin and stepmother Mary Pickford, mythic movie-making that included The Dawn Patrol, Little Caesar, The Prisoner of Zenda and Gunga Din, stories of lifelong cronies Laurence Olivier, Noël Coward and David Niven, fond recollections of mentors Jack Barrymore and Lord Mountbatten.

The Salad Days, the first volume of his autobiography, spans the twenties and thirties and ends in 1941, when FDR sent him and his new wife Mary Lee on a fact-finding tour of South America just before the United States entered World War II.

DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS, Jr. starred in seventy-five motion pictures and produced others. He has garnered international awards in the arts and diplomacy, as well as combat citations. He is a fellow of schools and universities both in the United States and abroad, a trustee and a board member of theaters, museums, and international business corporations. Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., is currently at work on the second volume of his autobiography. He divides his time between New York City, Palm Beach, London and Los Angeles.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 431 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 837 g (29,5 oz) – PUBLISHER Collins, London, 1988 – ISBN 0-00-216332-2

Sal Mineo: His Life, Muder, and Mystery (H. Paul Jeffers)

Jeffers, H Paul - Sal MineoThe first full-length biography of the movie star who refused to live by Hollywood’s rules and the true-crime story behind his ultimate death.

From the Bronx to Broadway to Hollywood, from street crimes to stage plays to movie stardom, Sal Mineo grew up tough and moved fast. He was only sixteen when he received his first Oscar nomination, for his portrayal of Plato, the soulful teenager in the 1955 James Dean film Rebel Without a Cause, and in 1961 his performance in Exodus won him a second. Yet, by the end of the decade, at thirty, he was a movie has-been.

The 1950s made Mineo famous. Often cast as a troubled young delinquent, roles that saddled him with the nickname Switchblade Kid, Mineo on screen brought a romantic aura to danger, and his dreamy-eyed, baby-face good looks quickened the heartbeat of teenage girls across America. While Mineo’s talents far exceeded the limits of studio typecasting, his attempts throughout the sixties to redefine his movie persona failed, as H. Paul Jeffers shows in this long-overdue biography.

With care and caring, Jeffers’s volume tracks the dramatic ups and troubles downs of the career that eventually, in 1969, took Mineo back to the theater, as the director of the prison play Fortune and Men’s Eyes. It recounts, too, how the screen idol of the fifties strove to come to terms with his homosexuality, ultimately to declare himself an “erotic politician,” and compellingly it reconstructs the circumstances that surrounded Mineo’s mysterious and shocking death, at the age of thirty-seven, by a stab wound in the chest.

H. PAUL JEFFERS has published biographies of Theodore Roosevelt and Grover Cleveland as well as numerous true-crime books. He knew Sal Mineo intimately during the last seven years of his life. Jeffers lives in New York City.

Softcover – 396 pp., index – Dimensions 21,5 x 14,5 cm (8,5 x 5,7 inch) – Weight 669 g (23,6 oz) – PUBLISHER Doubleday & Company, Inc., Garden City, New York, 1979ISBN 0-7867-1012-8

Sam Fuller: Film Is Background – A Critical Study, With Interviews, a Filmography and a Bibliography (Lee Server)

“Samuel Michael Fuller, of Park Row, Hollywood and Paris, is a singular figure in the history of motion pictures. A tabloid poet, a formal innovator, a radical individualist, he is the writer-director of twenty-three of the most original, eccentric, and explosive movies ever made. His filmography is a unique paradox: work born for the most part in the lower depths of the ‘B’ movie mills, yet shot through with elements seldom seen outside the rarefied worlds of the avant-garde and ‘art’ film:  autobiography, thematic obsessions and technical experimentation. From his directorial debut, the 1949 ‘non-Western’ I Shot Jesse James, to the European-produced Street of No Return, released in 1989, Fuller has transcended the limitations imposed by laughably meager budgets, 10-day shooting schedules, hackneyed genres and grindhouse audiences. Each of his ‘yarns’ – as he calls his stories of crime and lust and war – is a free-fire zone of the unexpected and audacious: baroque compositions, long takes and elaborate camera movements; controversial and ‘shocking’ subject matter; big themes and dangerous ones – race, politics, patriotism. Fuller takes a palpable pleasure in subverting Hollywood’s clichés and standards of behavior. His protagonists are the sort most ambitious directors eschew, the dregs, lowlife criminals and hookers, stubbly-chinned dogfaces, borderline psychopaths and a few who cross the border and don’t look back. Fuller hates the mainstream moviemakers’ sanitized, idealized depictions of human behavior. When his characters get shot or stabbed or blown up there are no deathbed scenes or beatific last words, but screams of agony. If forced to choose between a fast buck and a noble gesture, they take the cash.

Examples of Fuller’s raw iconoclasm are legion. In Forty Guns an escaping killer holds his sister – the film’s leading lady – as a shield, daring the lawman hero to shoot and risk hitting her; the lawman shoots them both. In the famous cold opening of The Naked Kiss, a hand-held point-of-view shot, an enraged Constance Towers flails at the camera as her wig flies off to reveal a completely shaven head. In Fuller’s most productive period, the 1950s, he confronted the pieties of a conformist Zeitgeist. In The Steel Helmet, his G.I. hero loses his temper and murders a prisoner of war. The U.S. Army and various right-wing columnists were outraged. In Pick Up on South Street, Richard Widmark’s cocky three-time loser pickpocket, preparing to sell government secrets to the hightest bidder, ridicules the patriotic appeals of a righteous FBI agent. Asked if he knows what treason means, Widmark sneers, ‘Who cares!’ J. Edgar Hoover was mortified.” – From The Introduction.

The 25 films written and directed by Sam Fuller (e.g., Shock Corridor, The Naked Kiss and White Dog) are a combination of social commentary, bold plotting, brutal violence and dazzling cinematic technique. An extended interview with Fuller is the basis of this work; to it are added lengthy commentaries from his actors, cameramen, editors and many others. For each of the films, there is a critical analysis and an extensive plot synopsis. Also provided is a comprehensive filmography of his work.

Hardcover – 176 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 15 cm (9,3 x 5,9 inch) – Weight 419 g (14,8 oz) – PUBLISHER McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, Jefferson, North Carolina, 1994 – ISBN 0-7864-0008-0

 

Sam Spiegel (Natasha Fraser-Cavassoni)

fraser-cavassoni-natasha-sam-spiegelThe incredible life and times of Hollywood’s most iconoclastic producer, the miracle worker who went from penniless refugee to show biz legend, and made possible The African Queen, On the Waterfront, The Bridge on the River Kwai, and Lawrence of Arabia, not to speak of many more, including movies as distinct as Suddenly, Last Summer; Nicholas and Alexandra; The Last Tycoon; and Betrayal; all of them sharing the unique vision that earned Spiegel twenty-five Oscars: star-filled, bigger-than-life, conceived on a vast scale, intensely dramatic, and overwhelmingly ambitious.

In this rich and brilliant biography, Natasha Fraser-Cavassoni, who had the advantage of knowing and working for Spiegel, brings into sharp focus a Hollywood legend who was at once crafty, unscrupulous, mendacious, and equally capable of great charm and petty meanness, who was sentimental and ruthless, a shrewd judge of talent, a gambler on a colossal scale, a man of almost unique artistic vision and courage who was, in the final analysis, that most elusive and rare of movie producers, a genius.

The story of a how a Jewish refugee without a penny to his name managed to produce several of the greatest films of all time is alone worth telling, but Natasha Fraser-Cavassoni has done more; she has drawn the definitive portrait of the man himself – the elusive, witty, cynical adventurer who, like so many refugees, was able to live, succeed, and raise money everywhere, but who was at home nowhere. Spiegel surrounded himself with luxury and beautiful women but remained a loner despite his countless friends.

Spiegel was mysterious about his origins, prompting Arthur Miller to refer to him as “The Great Gatsby.” In reality, he was born of middle-class Jewish parents in the last years of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Raised in Jaroslav, in western Galicia, Spiegel left home in his late teens and quickly became a hero of the Hashomer Hatzair, a Zionist youth movement.

Step by step, with immense research and a vast number of interviews, Natasha Fraser-Cavassoni recreates the world of Sam Spiegel’s childhood and youth, separating often self-serving fiction from fact. She follows Spiegel’s dramatic flight from the Nazis in Berlin, a prison sentence in London, problems with the police in Paris and Mexico City, and finally his arrival in Los Angeles. In America his career languished for a time, though he acquired a reputation for being a supreme “fixer,” a brilliant luftmensh on the fringes of Hollywood power, the ultimate party-giver who knew everybody’s secrets and was always quick to charm women and take advantage of men. Billy Wilder called him “a modern day Robin Hood, who steals from the rich and steals from the poor.”

With a brilliant sense of time and place and a deep understanding of Spiegel’s complex personality, Fraser-Cavassoni traces his disasters, successes, romances, friendships, and tangled finances in a narrative that is rich with colorful Spiegel stories, scandals, and bon mots.

The cast of characters in Spiegel’s life includes Lauren Bacall, Humphrey Bogart, Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift, Robert De Niro, Barry Diller, David Geffen, Katharine Hepburn, John Huston, Elia Kazan, David Lean, Joseph L. Mankiewicz, Mike Nichols, Harold Pinter, Otto Preminger, Elizabeth Taylor, Gore Vidal, Orson Welles, Billy Wilder, Darryl F. Zanuck, bevies of beautiful women, three wives, countless members of high society, and, most important, Sam Spiegel himself – the last of the great independent film producers who, in the swashbuckling tradition of David O. Selznick and Samuel Goldwyn, operated alone, aimed high, and believed, above all, in their own star.

More than a major book about the movie business, Sam Spiegel is an intricate and engrossing biography, comparable in its richness, depth, and attention to detail to A. Scott Berg’s acclaimed biography of Samuel Goldwyn. It is a marvelous, once-in-a-lifetime reading experience and an astonishing debut for Natasha Fraser-Cavassoni.

NATASHA FRASER-CAVASSONI, currently European Editor for Harper’s Bazaar, and formerly a staff member and journalist at Women Wear Daily and W magazine, began her career as a company assistant on Spiegel’s production of Betrayal in 1982. She lives in Paris with her husband and two daughters.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 464 pp., index – Dimensions 24,5 x 16 cm (9,7 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 803 g (28,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Simon & Schuster, New York, New York, 2003 – ISBN 0-684-83619-X

Samuel Goldwyn (Lawrence J. Epstein)

epstein-lawrence-j-samuel-goldwyn“Since this multi-volumed history of the cinema is organized on auteurist principles, most of the individual volumes deal with the work of an important director, especially directors who have also prepared their own scripts and produced their own films. Some volumes, however, will be devoted to other filmmakers, especially producers, who have exercised unusual influence on the final versions of their films, particularly their aesthetic qualities.

The producer has probably been the most maligned individual connected with filmmaking. Often conceived of as a tyrant with no taste or integrity, a contempt for the public and a fearful eye for censors, whose sole interest is in a fast buck, the producer has been the butt of many jokes and the target of frustrated players, directors, and writers. Often producers have fostered this stereotype by conceiving of themselves as the taskmasters who keep spendthrift directors, temperamental stars, and costume and set designers with delusions of grandeur in line in order to bring films in on schedule and within their budgets.

A handful of producers in this country and elsewhere, however, have conceived of filmmaking as an art rather than just a business and have sought to turn out a limited number of films, every detail of which they have supervised personally. They have specialized in films which have either extraordinary social or artistic merits or outstanding value as popular entertainment. In the United States, most of these producers were in the past associated with United Artists, a releasing company for a group of independent production units. United Artists was formed in 1919 by Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks, Charles Chaplin, and D.W. Griffith, who wanted to keep for themselves the profits that others were making from their films.

Although Griffith was obliged to drop out of the association as his debts mounted, popular silent stars Pickford and Fairbanks and model auteur Chaplin continued to release their films through United Artists as long as they worked in this country. Others joined them, though most of the newcomers were exclusively producers, not players or directors – principal among them were David O. Selznick, Walter Wanger, and Samuel Goldwyn. Even Darryl F.  Zanuck’s Twentieth Century organization briefly released its films through UA before merging with Fox Films under Zanuck’s leadership.

United Artists reached the peak of its prestige in 1939-1940 when Chaplin released The Great Dictator, Goldwyn Wuthering Heights, Walter Wanger The Long Voyage Home from Eugene O’Neill’s plays, and Selznick Rebecca, Alfred Hitchcock’s first American film, even though Selznick’s Gone With the Wind was distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer as part of a deal that enabled Selznick to borrow Clark Gable to play Rhett Butler.

lronically, in an era when the kind of independent production United Artists pioneered has become a principal manner of making major films, the company – though its name still exists – is not an association of independent producers but part of a conglomerate. However, its contribution to keeping Hollywood filmmaking from degenerating into mindless mass production at the height of the power of the big studios in the 1930s and 1940s was unique and invaluable.

The distinctive qualities of Samuel Goldwyn’s films cannot be easily summarized. It takes Lawrence Epstein the rest of this book to identify and explain “the Goldwyn touch.” It should be cautioned here, however, that, because of the large number of films that Goldwyn produced during the thirty-six years that he controlled his own company, not every one of these productions – some of which are now lost, dated, or largely forgotten – is discussed, nor are those important and representative films chosen for detailed analysis discussed chronologically, although the arrangement is chronological within each chapter.

Professor Epstein has chosen instead to look at groups of films which are representative of Goldwyn’s efforts to please a family public in his popular entertainment films starring comedians like Eddie Cantor, Bob Hope, and Danny Kaye, and to reach a concerned public often ignored by other producers and to educate them in problems of contemporary life in those serious dramas about domestic problems that are his chief claims to fame – Street Scene, Arrowsmith, Cynara, These Three, Dead End, The Little Foxes, and The Best Years of Our Lives. Only one other of his films competes with the last just named (Goldwyn’s only Academy Award winner) as a film classic. Transcending both popular entertainment and domestic tragedy to become one of the few films to achieve truly mythical status, it is probably the film still most widely and admiringly associated with Goldwyn’s name, Wuthering Heights.

Curiously, as Lawrence Epstein explains, Goldwyn came close to never making either Wuthering Heights or The Best Years of Our Lives. He lavished much more of his enthusiasm on such ill-fated projects as Nana, The Goldwyn Follies, and Porgy and Bess. Like all auteurs, he had his weaknesses, his prejudices, and his ill-advised pet projects. Whatever “the Goldwyn touch” was, it was no certain thing. But no Hollywood producer has established a better record than Goldwyn at his best. His story shows what a resolutely independent producer with an indomitable will could contribute to an industry constantly threatened with becoming mired in its complacent mediocrity. If only such a figure had had a comparable impact on television.” – Editor’s Foreword by Warren French.

LAWRENCE JEFFREY EPSTEIN was born in New York City. He attended the State University of New York at Albany, receiving the E.A. and M.A. in English and the Ph.D. in philosophy and education. He also studied film history and filmmaking at Albany. During his early years of graduate study he starred in a number of experimental films and made several films himself. Since 1974 Professor Epstein has been in the English Department at Suffolk County Community College in Selden, New York. In addition to courses in creative writing and journalism, he teaches a course there on mass media. His fiction, reviews, and articles have appeared in a variety of publications. Besides popular culture, he has specialized in writing about Judaica.

Hardcover – 202 pp., index – Dimensions 21 x 14 cm (8,3 x 5,5 inch) – Weight 412 g (14,5 oz) – PUBLISHER Twayne Publishers, Boston, Massachusetts, 1981 – ISBN 0-8057-9282-1

Samuel Goldwyn: Movie Mogul (Jeremy Barnes)

barnes-jeremy-samuel-goldwyn“In September 1895, a Polish boy of thirteen disembarked from a ship into the crowded, echoing halls of the immigration center at Ellis Island, in New York harbor. He was one of the tens of thousands of European Jews, many of them from Russia and Poland, who immigrated to the United States in the late nineteenth century. They flocked to America dreaming of freedom and prosperity.

The boy, Samuel Goldfisch, was filled with that dream. He also was gifted with an unusual amount of drive and imagination. On his arrival in the United States, he assumed that whatever future he had lay in making gloves, the kind of small handwork business that many immigrants brought from the old country.

He could not have imagined that his ultimate fortune and fame would be achieved in a field that was just then in the process of being invented, and that the entire world would come to know him not as Sam Goldfisch, glovemaker, but as Samuel Goldwyn, motion picture producer. In 1895, Sam had never heard of motion pictures. Neither had most Americans.” – From chapter 1, ‘Two beginnings.’

Hardcover – 128 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 17 cm (9,5 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 429 g (15,1 oz) – PUBLISHER Silver Burdett Press, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1998 – ISBN 0-382-09586-3

Samuel Goldwyn Presents (Alvin H. Marrill)

marill-alvin-h-samuel-goldwyn-presents“The greatest tribute to him is that the phrase ‘the Goldwyn touch’ is part of the vocabulary of Hollywood.” Samuel Goldwyn’s biographer, Alva Johnston, wrote that assessment in the thirties. It remains valid today. Between 1923 and 1959, eighty motion pictures bore a distinguished legend ahead of the titles, three words framed proudly in a half laurel wreath – a guarantee to moviegoers throughout the world of exceptional screen entertainment. The words were simply ‘Samuel Goldwyn Presents.’ And they introduced such unforgettable films as Arrowsmith, Dodsworth, Street Scene, Stella Dallas, Wuthering Heights, The Westerner, The Pride of the Yankees, The Best Years of Our Lives, Porgy and Bess, and scores more. They heralded great love stories starring Ronald Colman and Vilma Banky, Merle Oberon and Fredric March, Miriam Hopkins and Joel McCrea; the grand Eddie Cantor musical spectaculars of the thirties, featuring the earliest works of Busby Berkeley; the delightfully zany Danny Kaye wartime extravaganzas; the wit, the wisdom, the social commentaries, and The Goldwyn Girls of the day.

Samuel Goldwyn Presents offers, for the first time, a comprehensive study of one of the giants of motion pictures and his legacy to the American cinema. He was the first of Hollywood’s great independents, making only the films that he would enjoy seeing proudly in the company of his wife and son – memorable movies over which he alone had complete control. Comments by three Goldwyn stars – Teresa Wright, Virginia Mayo, and Joel McCrea – begin this book. It continues with a biographical journey following Goldwyn’s spectacular rise from Polish immigrant to glove salesman to showman par excellence to maverick filmmaker and last of the great Hollywood moguls. Then it devotes itself to the study of all eighty Goldwyn films. A detailed filmography is provided, with complete cast, character, and technical credits; notes on filming; a brief summary for each movie; a sampling of critical opinion; and more than 400 photographs to bring back cherished moments from those long-ago Saturday afternoons at the local bijou. The book ends with a Goldwyn star gallery and photos of the important craftsmen who helped create the legendary “Goldwyn touch.” An appendix includes a listing of all the radio and television adaptations of the Goldwyn films, and a testimonial that provides for lovers of the cinema and film historians alike the essence of the genius who had a unique way with both the spoken word and the reflections on the silver screen – Samuel Goldwyn.

ALVIN H. MARILL is a life-long student of the cinema and a dedicated creditwatcher. Born in Brockton, Massachusetts, and a graduate of Boston University, he has been a writer-producer in radio, both in Boston and New York, was a free-lance critic for the Quincy (Massachusetts) Patriot-Ledger, and has reviewed films for Radio New York Worldwide. A frequent contributor to various entertainment journals, and, currently, television chronicler for Films in Review, Mr. Marill is author of The Films of Anthony Quinn, The Cinema of Edward G. Robinson, Katharine Hepburn: A Pictorial Study, and a forthcoming volume on the career of Robert Mitchum. Mr. Marill resides in New Jersey with his wife and two sons.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 320 pp., index – Dimensions 28,5 x 22 cm (11,2 x 8,7 inch) – Weight 1.015 g (35,8 oz) – PUBLISHER A. S. Barnes & Co., Inc., Cranbury, New Jersey, 1976 – ISBN 0-498-01658-7

San Fernando Valley; Then and Now (Jake Klein)

san-fernando-valley-then-and-now“Laid out like a refulgent jeweled box guarded by the rolling San Gabriels on three sides, the San Fernando Valley is a green carpet of urbanism during the day and a twinkling box of precious stones after sunset. Rows of yellow sodium lamps and green-glowing flourescents light oceans of asphalt and millions of perfect square plots, upon which sit the dreams of countless American families.

There it lies, looking over the shoulder of its big sister, Los Angeles – the Valley, as this huge swath of land just east of the California coast is known, is the much maligned and constantly debased stepchild of an equally maligned and debased parent city. Together, these two survivors tell an important tale.

Like so many places in the American West, this is a suburban refuge founded by freedom-seekers with the sweet taste of adventure on their tongues. The Valley is an encapsulation of America’s history and spirit.

On Saturday, August 3, 1769, a band of hearty men and mules trudged over the pass that is roughly where the San Diego Freeway now passes under Mulholland Highway as it snakes to Bel Air and disappears toward the sea. Spread out below the explorers was an unfettered view from one mountain range clear across this valley to the next. Utter possibility stretched out before these god-fearing men. These were Spanish and Mexican citizens charged by an absent king to make the dusty trek up from distant San Diego in order to establish a land route to Monterey, the site of an important Spanish settlement.” – From The Introduction.

Softcover – 88 pp. – Dimensions 19 x 22 cm (7,5 x 8,7 inch) – Weight 331 g (11,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Gibbs Smith, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2003 – ISBN 1-58685-229-9

San Francisco Then and Now (Bill Yenne)

scannen0067San Francisco is many things to many people. The popular slogan calls it “Everybody’s favorite city,” an appellation confirmed year after year as Conde Nast’s Traveler magazine rates the most popular tourist destinations in the world. Most San Franciscans call it simply “the City,” with a capital “C,” a convention followed in this book. Perhaps Rudyard Kipling summed it up best when he said: “San Francisco has only one drawback. ‘Tis hard to leave.”

San Francisco Then and Now looks at where San Francisco has been, and how it appears today. Photographs of San Francisco at the end of the twentieth century are compared to views of San Francisco as it was in years past; from the 1850s to the 1950s. The pictures have been selected for their ability to tell a story about a particular landmark or part of the city. In some photos the changes are dramatic; in others, the changes are subtle but still revealing. In some cases two historical photographs are compared to show how certain parts of the city changed in the first decades after the milestone 1906 earthquake. While the book’s primary focus is on famous vistas and familiar landmarks, it also explores well-known neighborhoods to provide a look how the places, where most San Franciscans live, have changed.

This is the story of San Francisco and its people and how they have molded this beautiful and picturesque place into one of the most visually exciting cities in the world.

BILL YENNE is the author of more than twenty-four books on various subjects; his specialties are histories of transportation, the military, and the American West. He has made San Francisco his home for more than twenty-five years and has taken a great interest in the city’s history. He is a member of the American Society of Journalists and Authors and the American Book Producers Association.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 144 pp., index – Dimensions 26 x 18 cm (10,2 x 7,1 inch) – Weight 1.025 g (36,2 oz) – PUBLISHER PRC Publishing, London, 1998 – ISBN 1-57145-156-0

Santa Monica: Then and Now (Jake Klein)

santa-monica-then-and-now“There is a powerful pioneer spirit that courses through the veins of those who are driven to tame and settle American places, and Southern California history is rife with people who were drawn to this wild land, which was utterly open and untouched by man’s heavy hands. One such city is Santa Monica, an exquisite coastal jewel perched on the edge of America.

Like so many beach towns, individuals who were in dogged pursuit of escape settled Santa Monica. The rolling purple of the Santa Monica Mountains plunging headlong into the Pacific Ocean proved irresistible, even to the earliest explorers. First discovered by non-Natives in the late 1700s, this area sat undeveloped. After Spanish explorers stumbled upon this stretch of coastal mountains in 1769, wars between the United States, Mexico, and Spain separated the lands. First deeded to Mexican nationals Xavier Alvarado and Antonio Machado in 1827, Santa Monica slowly became a popular destination for campers and smugglers. The rolling hills and canyons and the unpopulated coastline were perfect havens for those pleasure (and treasure) seekers – refugees from the dusty heat of Los Angeles. By the late 1860s, Santa Monica had been discovered and a city was born.” – From The Introduction.

Softcover – 88 pp. – Dimensions 19 x 22 cm (7,5 x 8,7 inch) – Weight 330 g (11,6 oz) – PUBLISHER Gibbs Smith, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2003 – ISBN 1-58685-230-2

Sarah Bernhardt: Artist and Icon (William A. Emboden)

emboden-william-a-sarah-bernhardt“There are numerous biographies of Sarah Bernhardt and a two volume autobiography. Biographers tend to thrive on anecdotal material paying little heed to history or truth, and autobiographies tend to be the dream of a life in years of reflection. In 1974, I published a biography of Sarah Bernhardt that was faithful to my vision of a woman I had never seen. In retrospect it seems to be more of a lengthy essay than a full blown narrative. A life so monumental in scope and encompassing so very many years would require a set of volumes with diverse contributors. Icons of this woman would number into the tens of thousands. Not since the 18th century legends of the fabled Adrienne Lecouvreur had an actress so captivated the imagination of her public. Playing in every role of consequence in the history of the French stage, she was soon the subject of plays that were created for her. When the medium of film came to pass, she was the first actress from the stage to star in a full length motion picture. During the Dreyfus affair she was the only woman present to hear the initial charges and then challenged the Captain’s accusers by inspiring Emile Zola to write J’accuse. The ravages of several wars brought her to the hospital as a nurse and later to the front lines during the First World War in order to entertain the troops. In America she was the first actress to enter a prison (San Quentin) in order to present theater to the inmates, and to incorporate them into her drama (A Christmas Night Under the Terror). When the Edison cylinder was only a roll of foil in 1880, she visited Thomas Edison in his home and recorded her voice on a long lost cylinder.

One of the least investigated aspects of that astonishing life was that of Sarah Bernhardt the artist. At age 25 she was already a famous actress and she found time to approach drawing, painting and sculpture as an alternative mode of expression. The artists Alfred Stevens, Gustave Doré, Jules Lefebre, Georges Clairin and Roland Mathieu-Meusnier all were instrumental in instructing her in their respective arts. She was soon selling her works, exhibiting in salons and was invited to participate in designing the sculptural facade of the casino in Monte Carlo. One of her sculptures was acquired by the Prince of Wales later Edward VII and another by Queen Mary, wife of George V. It was under the patronage of the same Prince of Wales that her first exhibition of oils and sculpture was seen in London. This 1879 exhibition earned accolades from many, including the distinguished artist and critic Sir Frederick Leighton. The profession of acting was coupled with that of an artist from 1869 until her death in 1923.

What we have remaining of this great figure are her works of art, over a dozen recordings of her voice, about seven films, numerous poems, plays, novels, journals, a treatise on acting, popular journalism in newspapers and magazines, political manifestos, drawings, sculpture, paintings and hordes of images from the camera and from those many artists who saw this woman as the incandescent figure that she was. Imperishably rising from her own ashes after a 1915 amputation of her right leg due to a miscalculated bit of stage management in Tosca, she continued to act. We also have the testimonies of those who lived long enough to have seen her act or a fortunate few who knew her. It was she for whom Escoffier created some of his most fabled recipes and who upon request served as her personal chef. This was the woman seen before all of the crowned heads of Europe and in the United States by President Theodore Roosevelt, a most welcome visitor to her salon in Paris.

All of the world knew Sarah Bernhardt. Extravagantly large and colorful posters announced her every performance, and entrepreneurs did not hesitate to use her image to promote every product from absinthe to cologne – often without her permission. That visage on a sheet of music could insure a sale of tens of thousands of copies no matter how poor the melody. Buttons, lapel pins, pendants and brooches bore that fabled profile. In her lifetime she had already become an icon for the ages. Inextricably linked with Joan of Arc, she had become one of the most beloved figures in the history of France. Her portrait graces a handsome postage stamp, and the Monnaie offers medals with her profile, and on the verso an enumeration of her most famous roles on stage. She had played in more than two hundred theater pieces and could recreate these at whim.” – From The Preface.

Softcover – 170 pp. – Dimensions 28 x 21,5 cm (11 x 8,5 inch) – Weight 645 g (22,8 oz) – PUBLISHER Severin Wunderman Museum Publications, Irvine, California, 1992

Scarlet O’Hara’s Younger Sister: My Lively Life In and Out of Hollywood (Evelyn Keyes)

Autographed copy Evelyn Keyes

Keyes, Evelyn - Scarlet O'Hara's Younger SisterOf the thousands of attractive girls who journeyed westward during the late thirties to find fame and fortune in Hollywood, few were touched even briefly by the golden spotlight. But an eighteen-year-old emigré from Georgia, Evelyn Keyes, was to be singled out. A combination of beauty, personality and circumstance opened the gates for her. Cecil B. DeMille offered her a screen contract and a career was under way. When casting began for Gone With the Wind, the young Georgian Miss was an obvious choice for the role of Suellen O’Hara, Scarlett’s younger sister.

Evelyn Keyes reached out hungrily for the Hollywood high life of the late thirties and forties. She was married to directors Charles Vidor and John Huston; patronized by Columbia mogul Harry Cohn (”I’ll make you a star”); had a whirlwind round-the-world three-year romance with the flamboyant and mercurial Mike Todd before Elizabeth Taylor came on the scene. There were more films and more romances before Miss Keyes married band leader Artie Shaw.

Life has been kind to Evelyn Keyes… but life has also treated her roughly and frequently without compassion.

She has had intimate contact with the greats and near greats of Hollywood and the jet set. They come vividly alive in this unvarnished memoir – warts and all! You’ll meet Fredric March, Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, Walter Huston, Kirk Douglas, Anthony Quinn, Paulette Goddard, Cantinflas, Eddie Fisher, Marilyn Monroe, Vivien Leigh, Clark Gable, Laurence Olivier, B. Traven, Sterling Hayden, Katherine Dunham and many, many others. From it all, there emerges a portrait of a courageous strong-willed woman – a far cry from the starry-eyed youngster, who long ago in an era now past, approached Hollywood the way Dorothy approached the Land of Oz.

Scarlett O’Hara’s Younger Sister, EVELYN KEYES’ autobiography, is a long look back at Hollywood, to a time when movies captured the fancy of the world and when our “stars” at work and play made front-page news.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 318 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 686 g (24,2 oz) – PUBLISHER Lyle Stuart, Inc., Secaucus, New Jersey, 1977 – ISBN 0-8184-0243-1

Scarlet O’Hara’s Younger Sister: My Lively Life In and Out of Hollywood (Evelyn Keyes)

Keyes, Evelyn - Scarlet O'Hara's Younger SisterOf the thousands of attractive girls who journeyed westward during the late thirties to find fame and fortune in Hollywood, few were touched even briefly by the golden spotlight. But an eighteen-year-old emigré from Georgia, Evelyn Keyes, was to be singled out. A combination of beauty, personality and circumstance opened the gates for her. Cecil B. DeMille offered her a screen contract and a career was under way. When casting began for Gone With the Wind, the young Georgian Miss was an obvious choice for the role of Suellen O’Hara, Scarlett’s younger sister.

Evelyn Keyes reached out hungrily for the Hollywood high life of the late thirties and forties. She was married to directors Charles Vidor and John Huston; patronized by Columbia mogul Harry Cohn (”I’ll make you a star”); had a whirlwind round-the-world three-year romance with the flamboyant and mercurial Mike Todd before Elizabeth Taylor came on the scene. There were more films and more romances before Miss Keyes married band leader Artie Shaw.

Life has been kind to Evelyn Keyes… but life has also treated her roughly and frequently without compassion.

She has had intimate contact with the greats and near greats of Hollywood and the jet set. They come vividly alive in this unvarnished memoir – warts and all! You’ll meet Fredric March, Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, Walter Huston, Kirk Douglas, Anthony Quinn, Paulette Goddard, Cantinflas, Eddie Fisher, Marilyn Monroe, Vivien Leigh, Clark Gable, Laurence Olivier, B. Traven, Sterling Hayden, Katherine Dunham and many, many others. From it all, there emerges a portrait of a courageous strong-willed woman – a far cry from the starry-eyed youngster, who long ago in an era now past, approached Hollywood the way Dorothy approached the Land of Oz.

Scarlett O’Hara’s Younger Sister, EVELYN KEYES’ autobiography, is a long look back at Hollywood, to a time when movies captured the fancy of the world and when our “stars” at work and play made front-page news.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 318 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 686 g (24,2 oz) – PUBLISHER Lyle Stuart, Inc., Secaucus, New Jersey, 1977 – ISBN 0-8184-0243-1

Scarlett, Rhett, and a Cast of Thousands: The Filming of Gone With the Wind (Roland Flamini)

flamini-roland-scarlett-rhett-and-a-cast-of-thousandsThe inside story of the “white elephant” that became a classic multi-million-dollar box-office smash. Over thirty years have passed since Gone With the Wind had its world premiere in Atlanta, Georgia. Today, all over the world, endless lines of moviegoers still wait to see each new showing of this epic film. Every great movie has a great story about how it was made, but the story behind the filming of Gone With the Wind easily surpasses them all. It is an incredible, vast, outrageous story – as raw, thundering and kaleidoscopic as the movie itself. No one until now has succeeded in telling it with such detail and with such style. The search for the actress to play Scarlett O’Hara created a wave of excitement that swept the nation. Everyone who had read the best-selling book had mentally cast her. Every actress coveted the key role. Hollywood divas pulled every devious and near-backstabbing trick to gain the lead. Younger starlets were willing to give almost anything for a screen test. One of them even popped out of a huge cake that had been delivered to the studio.

Producer David O. Selznick’s publicity scheme kept Hollywood columnists hustling for the truth behind wild rumors about every development of the search. But his talent for continuously fueling the stupendous public interest was as much a matter of personal salvation as it was genius. He had paid $ 50,000 for the movie rights of a Civil War epic by an unknown novelist, that Hollywood’s smart money wouldn’t touch, and he had become the laughing stock of the movie industry. He had burned the back lot of Selznick-International Studios to shoot the spectacular footage of the Atlanta fire before he even had a final cast and a workable script. And then he was broke.

Where, in the 1930s, did he get the whopping $ 3,957,000 to produce the picture? And why, at the very end, was he forced to sell the movie to MGM, which has continued to reap the lion’s share of the profits to this day? Flamini describes the ingenious maneuverings, the master moves and power plays, with obvious relish and skill. And then there were the superhero and the superheroine, Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh. Were they anything like the glossy images the Selznick publicity machine fed the public? Motorcycle-riding, skeet-shooting, cigarchewing Gable was petrified at the idea of playing the demanding role of Rhett Butler. The apparently sweet, demure Vivien Leigh was a tyrant on the set. With her quick temper and salty tongue she was capable of matching any abuse hurled at her by Victor Fleming, the formidable director who suffered a nervous breakdown before the film was completed.

Roland Flamini interviewed more than one hundred members of the cast and crew, combed through three-and-a-half years of movie magazines and the newspaper columns of Hedda Hopper and Louella Parsons, and consulted the unpublished letters of Margaret Mitchell to recreate this great story behind one of the greatest movies ever made.

ROLAND FLAMINI, a Time magazine correspondent who has covered stories in Rome, Vienna, Chicago, Paris, and New York, is presently a correspondent in the Los Angeles Bureau.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 355 pp., index – Dimensions 23 x 15,5 cm (9,1 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 827 g (29,2 oz) – PUBLISHER Macmillan Publishing Co., Inc., New York, New York, 1975 – ISBN 0-02-538670-0

Scatman: An Authorized Biography of Scatman Crothers (Jim Haskins, with Helen Crothers)

hashins-jim-scatmanAt the time of his death in 1986, Sherman “Scatman” Crothers had had many careers in entertainment – as a singer, a songwriter, a band leader, a nightclub performer, and ultimately, as one of the best-known character actors to break out of Hollywood. A performer for more than fifty years, Scatman was ubiquitous on television and in films, from voice-overs on Saturday-morning cartoons to roles in such film classics as The Shining and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest to stardom in the hit television series Chico and the Man in his role as Louie the Garbageman.

Scatman: An Authorized Biography of Scatman Crothers, by Jim Haskins, author of Mr. Bojangles and Queen of the Blues, is the intimate biography of Scatman Crothers. It begins with his childhood in Terre Haute, Indiana, where he put on shows for the kids in the neighborhood, dancing, singing, and performing simple magic tricks. It discusses his first stage appearances in speakeasies during Prohibition, where he entertained Al Capone and John Dillinger. It chronicles his early years on the radio, when he was called “Scat Man, the man with a thousand tunes,” and relates the story of his courtship of a white woman, Helen, with whom he fell in love in 1936, and married during an era when that was both a courageous and foolish act. And it follows him through his appearances on Dixie Showboat, a local Los Angeles television show, where he became the first black actor to appear on a regular series, through his development as a screen actor, to his “big break” – a leading role in Chico and the Man.

Filled with anecdotes and personal reminiscences – Scatman assisted in the writing of this book before his death, and his wife continued afterward – Scatman is told with warmth, humor, and genuine love. It is a Hollywood biography of one of the industry’s unsung heroes.

JIM HASKINS is the author of more than fifty books. He has written reviews for the Gainesville Sun, The New York Times, and other publications. A professor of English at the University of Florida, Jim Haskins lives in New York City and Gainesville.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 224 pp., index – Dimensions 21,5 x 14,5 cm (8,5 x 5,7 inch) – Weight 390 g (13,8 oz) – PUBLISHER William Morrow and Company, Inc., New York, New York, 1991 – ISBN 0-688-08521-0

Science Fiction in the Cinema (John Baxter)

Baxter, John - Science Fiction in the Cinema“Throughout the history of science fiction, it has been an article of faith among its readers that filmed sf was an abomination, that it degraded the field and provided nothing of interest to the serious mind.

After seeing a few sf films one accepted this view with alacrity. The plots one saw unrolling on the screen had little relation to those used in the books and magazines of science fiction which one read, while the recreation of the of fantastic situations fell far short of that possible in the mind of the interested sf reader. If one went to sf films after that, it was to mock rather than to watch.

A similar lack of interest was shown by film buffs, who found as much to scorn in the films’ plots as did science fiction fans. Yet neither side spared a thought for the faceless crowd surrounding them, the devoted audience which filled theaters for even the most trivial and transparent piece of space opera. If anybody was aware that science fiction film was a popular part of the commercial cinema, he quickly put the idea aside…” – From chapter 1, ‘What Science Fiction Films Where?’

Softcover – 240 pp. – Dimensions 16 x 13,5 cm (6,3 x 5,3 inch) – Weight 248 g (8,7 oz) – PUBLISHER A. S. Barnes & Co., New York, New York, 1970 – SBN 498-07416-X

Screening History (Gore Vidal)

vidal-gore-screening-historyAs I now move, graciously, I hope, toward the door marked Exit, it occurs to me that the only thing I ever really liked to do was go to the movies. Naturally, Sex and Art always took precedence over the cinema. Unfortunately, neither ever proved to he as dependable as the filtering of present light through that moving strip of celluloid which projects past images and voices onto a screen. Thus, in a seemingly simple process, screening history.

Gore Vidal saw his first talking picture in 1929 when he was four years old. At age ten, the film A Midsummer Night’s Dream whetted his appetite for all of Shakespeare’s plays, and Mickey Rooney’s Puck inspired his early fantasy about becoming an actor. Yet it was movies about history, albeit history as brought to life on the silver screen, that he remembers most vividly from his youth. Movies such as Roman Scandals, The Prince and the Pauper, and Fire Over England, in his words, “opened for me that door to the past where I have spent so much of my life-long present.”

Author of Burr, Lincoln, and other best-selling novels chronicling our experience, Vidal shows how history and fiction blend in the private and public worlds of his generation. In Screening History, he intertwines fond recollections of films savored in the movie palaces of his Washington, D.C., boyhood with strands of autobiography and trenchant observations about American politics. Never before has Vidal – a scion of one of our oldest political families – revealed so much about his own life or written with such marvellous immediacy about the real and imagined forces that have shaped America in the twentieth century.

We see Vidal witnessing history as his grandfather is sworn in for a fourth Senate term during the Depression; we see him making history as a young airman often flying a Hammond Y-l under the watchful eye of his father, FDR’s Director of Aviation; and we journey back with him to America in the 1930s and 1940s, to theaters with names like the Belasco and the Metropolitan where the history screened for the nation’s moviegoers often turned reality into fantasy, or into downright propaganda.

Screening History is rich with anecdotes about Vidal’s eminent family and shrewd insights about prominent figures known and observed. It captures the hold that movies have had on the American imagination and the mark they left on the mind of a youngster who grew up to become one of our best-known and most controversial literary figures. At times poignant, often bitingly funny, this is Gore Vidal at his best, inscribing his views on the American political scene from FDR to George Bush and on issues from the writing of history to the inability of movies to set history straight. The rapier wit for which he is legend animates every page.

GORE VIDAL’s many honors include the National Book Critics Circle Award for criticism and the Cannes Critics Prize.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 96 pp. – Dimensions 23 x 15,5 cm (9,1 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 359 g (12,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1992 – ISBN 0-674-79586-5

Screen World 1949 Film Annual, Volume 1 (Daniel Blum)

Blum, Daniel - Screen World 1949This is the first volume of a new annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 22,5 x 15 cm (8,9 x 5,9 inch) – Weight 580 g (20,5 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers and Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1949 (1969 reprint)

Screen World 1951 Film Annual, Volume 2 (Daniel Blum)

Blum, Daniel - Screen World 1951This is the second volume of a new annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover – 255 pp., index – Dimensions 22,5 x 15 cm (8,9 x 5,9 inch) – Weight 594 g (21,0 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers and Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1951 (1969 reprint)

Screen World 1952 Film Annual, Volume 3 (Daniel Blum)

Blum, Daniel - Screen World 1952This is the third volume of a new annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 192 pp., index – Dimensions 22,5 x 15 cm (8,9 x 5,9 inch) – Weight 449 g (15,8 oz) – PUBLISHER Greenberg, New York, New York, 1952

Screen World 1952 Film Annual, Volume 3 (Daniel Blum)

blum-daniel-screen-world-1952-2This is the third volume of a new annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover – 192 pp., index – Dimensions 22,5 x 15 cm (8,9 x 5,9 inch) – Weight 462 g (16,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers & Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1952

Screen World 1953 Film Annual, Volume 4 (Daniel Blum)

Blum, Daniel - Screen World 1953This is the fourth volume of an annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 192 pp., index – Dimensions 22,5 x 15 cm (8,9 x 5,9 inch) – Weight 449 g (15,8 oz) – PUBLISHER Greenberg, New York, New York, 1953

Screen World 1953 Film Annual, Volume 4 (Daniel Blum)

blum-daniel-screen-world-1953-2This is the fourth volume of an annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover – 192 pp., index – Dimensions 22,5 x 15 cm (8,9 x 5,9 inch) – Weight 476 g (16,8 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers & Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1953

Screen World 1954 Film Annual, Volume 5 (Daniel Blum)

Blum, Daniel - Screen World 1954This is the fifth volume of an annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover – 224 pp., index – Dimensions 22,5 x 15 cm (8,9 x 5,9 inch) – Weight 537 g (18,9 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers and Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1954 (1969 reprint)

Screen World 1955 Film Annual, Volume 6 (Daniel Blum)

Blum, Daniel - Screen World 1955This is the sixth volume of an annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 22,5 x 15 cm (8,9 x 5,9 inch) – Weight 567 g (20 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers and Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1955 (1969 reprint)

Screen World 1956 Film Annual, Volume 7 (Daniel Blum)

Blum, Daniel - Screen World 1956This is the seventh volume of an annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 652 g (23 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers and Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1956 (1969 reprint)

Screen World 1957 Film Annual, Volume 8 (Daniel Blum)

Blum, Daniel - Screen World 1957This is the eighth volume of an annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 653 g (23 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers and Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1957 (1969 reprint)

Screen World 1958 Film Annual, Volume 9 (Daniel Blum)

Blum, Daniel - Screen World 1958This is the ninth volume of an annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 655 g (23,1 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers and Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1958 (1969 reprint)

Screen World 1959 Film Annual, Volume 10 (Daniel Blum)

This is the tenthBlum, Daniel - Screen World 1959 volume of an annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 624 g (22 oz) – PUBLISHER Chilton Company – Book Division, New York, New York, 1959

Screen World 1959 Film Annual, Volume 10 (Daniel Blum)

blum-daniel-screen-world-1959-2This is the tenth volume of an annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 664 g (23,4 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers & Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1959

Screen World 1960 Film Annual, Volume 11 (Daniel Blum)

Blum, Daniel - Screen World 1960This is the eleventh volume of an annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 631 g (22,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Chilton Company – Book Division, New York, New York, 1960

Screen World 1960 Film Annual, Volume 11 (Daniel Blum)

blum-daniel-screen-world-1960-2This is the eleventh volume of an annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 594 g (21 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers & Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1960

Screen World 1961 Film Annual, Volume 12 (Daniel Blum)

Blum, Daniel - Screen World 1961This is the twelfth volume of an annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 614 g (21,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Chilton Company – Book Division, New York, New York, 1961

Screen World 1961 Film Annual, Volume 12 (Daniel Blum)

blum-daniel-screen-world-1961-2This is the twelfth volume of an annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 596 g (21 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers & Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1961

Screen World 1962 Film Annual, Volume 13 (Daniel Blum)

Blum, Daniel - Screen World 1962 bisThis is the thirteenth volume of an annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 603 g (21,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Chilton Company – Book Division, New York, New York, 1962

Screen World 1962 Film Annual, Volume 13 (Daniel Blum)

blum-daniel-screen-world-1962-2This is the thirteenth volume of an annual which covers all the motion pictures released during each calendar year. In it, editor Daniel Blum does for the screen what Theatre World does each year for the stage.

Here you will find more than 500 photographs, scenes shot from American and foreign films, complete cast lists, articles, obituaries, and a thoroughly comprehensive index.

If you are interested in Motion Pictures either as a moviegoer or a member of the profession, you will find this profusely illustrated volume a welcome addition to your library from year to year.

DANIEL BLUM was born in Chicago, Illinois, attended Shakespeare Grammar School and Howe School, Howe, Indiana. From there he went to Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Blum’s early years were spent going to the theater and keeping scrap books on the theater. Today, as a result of his childhood hobby, he owns one of the finest private theatrical collections in the country: photographs, programs, and clippings of everyone of importance in the theater. His love for and devotion to the theater have dominated Mr. Blum’s life, and many of the theater’s greats, past and present, are his personal friends. He takes a keen interest in young upcoming players and encourages and helps them to success. An inveterate playgoer, he has seen all the important plays and films produced in this country in the past thirty-five years.

Hardcover – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 588 g (20,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers & Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1962

Screen World 1963 Film Annual, Volume 14 (Daniel Blum)

Blum, Daniel - Screen World 1963By now, Screen World, of which this is the fourteenth annual volume, has become the recognized chronicle of the motion picture industry.

Of its predecessors the critics have written: “The new edition is in keeping with the really high standard which Blum set first.” “This summary of cinema does provide highly satisfactory and accurate data that continues to supply information right up to those late reruns.” “This is the best annual pictorial presentation of the screen issued anywhere in the world.” “Certainly nobody has done more to preserve the passing scene, season by season.”

Richly deserved as these comments are, they are backed by the comprehensiveness of the present volume: more than 500 pictures, scenes from domestic and foreign films, complete cast lists, obituaries, and a detailed index.

Every moviegoer, either a spectator or a member of the profession, will find this fourteenth volume as important to his library as the previous Daniel Blum records were.

DANIEL BLUM, a native of Chicago, Illinois, attended the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania before settling permanently in New York City. His love of the theater evidenced itself at once and while becoming an inveterate theater goer, he also managed to assemble an impressive collection of scrap books on the theater and the motion picture. This avocation, with its attendant collection of photographs, programs, clippings, reviews, and memorabilia, has led him to his present occupation of compiling the annual Theatre World and Screen World volumes, in addition to his well-known books A Pictorial History of the American Theatre, A Pictorial History of Television, and A Pictorial History of Opera in America. Among Mr. Blum’s most intimate friends are the great of the theater and the film world. He has taken an avid interest in the budding careers of many young actors and the accolade of being named a promising player by Daniel Blum is almost the open sesame to success. In more than thirty-five years of theater going, Mr. Blum has seen all the important plays and films shown in this country.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 609 g (21,5 oz) – PUBLISHER Chilton Books, New York, New York, 1963

Screen World 1963 Film Annual, Volume 14 (Daniel Blum)

blum-daniel-screen-world-1963-2By now, Screen World, of which this is the fourteenth annual volume, has become the recognized chronicle of the motion picture industry.

Of its predecessors the critics have written: “The new edition is in keeping with the really high standard which Blum set first.” “This summary of cinema does provide highly satisfactory and accurate data that continues to supply information right up to those late reruns.” “This is the best annual pictorial presentation of the screen issued anywhere in the world.” “Certainly nobody has done more to preserve the passing scene, season by season.”

Richly deserved as these comments are, they are backed by the comprehensiveness of the present volume: more than 500 pictures, scenes from domestic and foreign films, complete cast lists, obituaries, and a detailed index.

Every moviegoer, either a spectator or a member of the profession, will find this fourteenth volume as important to his library as the previous Daniel Blum records were.

DANIEL BLUM, a native of Chicago, Illinois, attended the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania before settling permanently in New York City. His love of the theater evidenced itself at once and while becoming an inveterate theater goer, he also managed to assemble an impressive collection of scrap books on the theater and the motion picture. This avocation, with its attendant collection of photographs, programs, clippings, reviews, and memorabilia, has led him to his present occupation of compiling the annual Theatre World and Screen World volumes, in addition to his well-known books A Pictorial History of the American Theatre, A Pictorial History of Television, and A Pictorial History of Opera in America. Among Mr. Blum’s most intimate friends are the great of the theater and the film world. He has taken an avid interest in the budding careers of many young actors and the accolade of being named a promising player by Daniel Blum is almost the open sesame to success. In more than thirty-five years of theater going, Mr. Blum has seen all the important plays and films shown in this country.

Hardcover – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 589 g (20,8 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers & Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1963

Screen World 1964 Film Annual, Volume 15 (Daniel Blum)

Blum, Daniel - Screen World 1964By now, Screen World, of which this is the fifteenth annual volume, has become the recognized chronicle of the motion picture industry.

Of its predecessors the critics have written: “The new edition is in keeping with the really high standard which Blum set first.” “This summary of cinema does provide highly satisfactory and accurate data that continues to supply information right up to those late reruns.” “This is the best annual pictorial presentation of the screen issued anywhere in the world.” “Certainly nobody has done more to preserve the passing scene, season by season.”

Richly deserved as these comments are, they are backed by the comprehensiveness of the present volume: more than 500 pictures, scenes from domestic and foreign films, complete cast lists, obituaries, and a detailed index.

Every moviegoer, either a spectator or a member of the profession, will find this fourteenth volume as important to his library as the previous Daniel Blum records were.

DANIEL BLUM, a native of Chicago, Illinois, attended the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania before settling permanently in New York City. His love of the theater evidenced itself at once and while becoming an inveterate theater goer, he also managed to assemble an impressive collection of scrap books on the theater and the motion picture. This avocation, with its attendant collection of photographs, programs, clippings, reviews, and memorabilia, has led him to his present occupation of compiling the annual Theatre World and Screen World volumes, in addition to his well-known books A Pictorial History of the American Theatre, A Pictorial History of Television, and A Pictorial History of Opera in America. Among Mr. Blum’s most intimate friends are the great of the theater and the film world. He has taken an avid interest in the budding careers of many young actors and the accolade of being named a promising player by Daniel Blum is almost the open sesame to success. In more than thirty-five years of theater going, Mr. Blum has seen all the important plays and films shown in this country.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 640 g (22,6 oz) – PUBLISHER Chilton Books, New York, New York, 1964

Screen World 1964 Film Annual, Volume 15 (Daniel Blum)

blum-daniel-screen-world-1964-2By now, Screen World, of which this is the fifteenth annual volume, has become the recognized chronicle of the motion picture industry.

Of its predecessors the critics have written: “The new edition is in keeping with the really high standard which Blum set first.” “This summary of cinema does provide highly satisfactory and accurate data that continues to supply information right up to those late reruns.” “This is the best annual pictorial presentation of the screen issued anywhere in the world.” “Certainly nobody has done more to preserve the passing scene, season by season.”

Richly deserved as these comments are, they are backed by the comprehensiveness of the present volume: more than 500 pictures, scenes from domestic and foreign films, complete cast lists, obituaries, and a detailed index.

Every moviegoer, either a spectator or a member of the profession, will find this fourteenth volume as important to his library as the previous Daniel Blum records were.

DANIEL BLUM, a native of Chicago, Illinois, attended the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania before settling permanently in New York City. His love of the theater evidenced itself at once and while becoming an inveterate theater goer, he also managed to assemble an impressive collection of scrap books on the theater and the motion picture. This avocation, with its attendant collection of photographs, programs, clippings, reviews, and memorabilia, has led him to his present occupation of compiling the annual Theatre World and Screen World volumes, in addition to his well-known books A Pictorial History of the American Theatre, A Pictorial History of Television, and A Pictorial History of Opera in America. Among Mr. Blum’s most intimate friends are the great of the theater and the film world. He has taken an avid interest in the budding careers of many young actors and the accolade of being named a promising player by Daniel Blum is almost the open sesame to success. In more than thirty-five years of theater going, Mr. Blum has seen all the important plays and films shown in this country.

Hardcover – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 601 g (21,2 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers & Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1964

Screen World 1965 Film Annual, Volume 16 (Daniel Blum)

Each year thousands of Daniel Blum’s ardent fans eagerly await the new volume of this famous annual. No other book begins to cover the current film output – both American and foreign – so thoroughly. Here are more than one thousand shots of scenes and actors and actresses (some in full-page portraits), lists of complete casts, producers, directors, costume designers, music directors, and many other important film facts, including obituaries.

The comprehensive index alone is invaluable, nearly 5,000 entries, so that movie fan and cinema student alike can instantly locate in what picture a given player appeared and see him in photographs from that movie.

This current and sixteenth annual edition of Screen World is a joy to browse through and an indispensable reference for checking thousands of movie facts and figures.

DANIEL BLUM is a leader in the literature of the theater and the movies. Twenty-one years ago he brought out his first Theatre World, sixteen years ago his first Screen World. These two annuals are today known throughout the world. In addition to these books he has compiled many monumental works on the theater and the movies, among them A Pictorial History of the American Theatre: 100 Years, 1860-1960, A Pictorial Treasury of the Opera, A Pictorial History of Television, A Pictorial History of the Silent Screen, A Pictorial History of the Talkies, and Great Stars of the American Stage. A collector of friends as well as theater memorabilia, Mr. Blum numbers among his intimates the great of the theater and the screen, as well as many young players who are ascending the ladder of fame and to whose success he has devoted much of his time and talent.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 648 g (22,9 oz) – PUBLISHER Crown Publishers, New York, New York, 1965

Screen World 1965 Film Annual, Volume 16 (Daniel Blum)

blum-daniel-screen-world-1965-2Each year thousands of Daniel Blum’s ardent fans eagerly await the new volume of this famous annual. No other book begins to cover the current film output – both American and foreign – so thoroughly. Here are more than one thousand shots of scenes and actors and actresses (some in full-page portraits), lists of complete casts, producers, directors, costume designers, music directors, and many other important film facts, including obituaries.

The comprehensive index alone is invaluable, nearly 5000 entries, so that movie fan and cinema student alike can instantly locate in what picture a given player appeared and see him in photographs from that movie.

This current and sixteenth annual edition of Screen World is a joy to browse through and an indispensable reference for checking thousands of movie facts and figures.

DANIEL BLUM is a leader in the literature of the theater and the movies. Twenty-one years ago he brought out his first Theatre World, sixteen years ago his first Screen World. These two annuals are today known throughout the world. In addition to these books he has compiled many monumental works on the theater and the movies, among them A Pictorial History of the American Theatre: 100 Years, 1860-1960, A Pictorial Treasury of the Opera, A Pictorial History of Television, A Pictorial History of the Silent Screen, A Pictorial History of the Talkies, and Great Stars of the American Stage. A collector of friends as well as theater memorabilia, Mr. Blum numbers among his intimates the great of the theater and the screen, as well as many young players who are ascending the ladder of fame and to whose success he has devoted much of his time and talent.

Hardcover – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 600 g (21,2 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers & Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1965

Screen World 1966 Film Annual, Volume 17 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1966This famous film annual, now in its seventeenth year, is the most lavish to date. There are more than 1,000 exciting shots from both domestic and foreign movies, showing highlight scenes, close-ups of actors and actresses in their most dramatic moments, portraits of the most promising personalities of the year, and many full-page portraits of the top stars. Included are producers, directors, costume designers, music directors, studios, release dates, Academy Awards, biographies, obituaries, as well as complete lists of the casts. The valuable index contains more than 5,000 entries.

Everyone interested in films, whether he sees them for entertainment, or for serious study of the art of the cinema, will find this annual a joy to browse through and an indispensable reference volume for checking thousands of facts and figures pertaining to the movies for this period.

Hardcover – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 647 g (22,8 oz) – PUBLISHER Crown Publishers, New York, New York, 1966

Screen World 1966 Film Annual, Volume 17 (John Willis)

willis-john-screen-world-1966-2This famous film annual, now in its seventeenth year, is the most lavish to date. There are more than 1,000 exciting shots from both domestic and foreign movies, showing highlight scenes, close-ups of actors and actresses in their most dramatic moments, portraits of the most promising personalities of the year, and many full-page portraits of the top stars. Included are producers, directors, costume designers, music directors, studios, release dates, Academy Awards, biographies, obituaries, as well as complete lists of the casts. The valuable index contains more than 5,000 entries.

Everyone interested in films, whether he sees them for entertainment, or for serious study of the art of the cinema, will find this annual a joy to browse through and an indispensable reference volume for checking thousands of facts and figures pertaining to the movies for this period.

Hardcover – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 623 g (22 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers & Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1966

Screen World 1967 Film Annual, Volume 18 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1967This famous film annual, now in its eighteenth year, is the most lavish to date. There are more than 1,000 exciting shots from both domestic and foreign movies, showing highlight scenes, close-ups of actors and actresses in their most dramatic moments, portraits of the most promising personalities of the year, and many full-page portraits of the top stars. Included are producers, directors, costume designers, music directors, studios, release dates, Academy Awards, biographies, obituaries, as well as complete lists of the casts. The valuable index contains more than 5,000 entries.

Everyone interested in films, whether he sees them for entertainment, or for serious study of the art of the cinema, will find this annual a joy to browse through and an indispensable reference volume for checking thousands of facts and figures pertaining to the movies for this period.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 658 g (23,2 oz) – PUBLISHER Crown Publishers, New York, New York, 1967

Screen World 1967 Film Annual, Volume 18 (John Willis)

willis-john-screen-world-1967-2This famous film annual, now in its eighteenth year, is the most lavish to date. There are more than 1,000 exciting shots from both domestic and foreign movies, showing highlight scenes, close-ups of actors and actresses in their most dramatic moments, portraits of the most promising personalities of the year, and many full-page portraits of the top stars. Included are producers, directors, costume designers, music directors, studios, release dates, Academy Awards, biographies, obituaries, as well as complete lists of the casts. The valuable index contains more than 5,000 entries.

Everyone interested in films, whether he sees them for entertainment, or for serious study of the art of the cinema, will find this annual a joy to browse through and an indispensable reference volume for checking thousands of facts and figures pertaining to the movies for this period.

Hardcover – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 643 g (22,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers & Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1967

Screen World 1968 Film Annual, Volume 19 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1968Who are the unknowns of Hollywood that will become the stars of tomorrow? In this popular current annual John Willis selects thirteen of the most promising film personalities of the season, and features each one in a large portrait photograph. These are but a few of the book’s 1,000 exciting shots of actors, actresses, and highlight scenes from the year’s domestic and foreign movies.

All important statistics are included, with photographs for each movie: cast lists, producers, directors, studios, costume designers, composers, release dates, color production, writers, and many other valuable facts. Academy Award winners are listed from 1927 to date. In addition, there is a section on obituaries, as well as a valuable index containing more than 5,000 entries.

Everyone interested in films, whether he sees them for entertainment or for serious study of the art of the cinema, will find this nineteenth annual a joy to browse through and an indispensable reference volume for checking thousands of facts and figures pertaining to the movies for this period.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 647 g (22,8 oz) – PUBLISHER Frederick Muller, 1968

Screen World 1968 Film Annual, Volume 19 (John Willis)

willis-john-screen-world-1968-2Who are the unknowns of Hollywood that will become the stars of tomorrow? In this popular current annual John Willis selects thirteen of the most promising film personalities of the season, and features each one in a large portrait photograph. These are but a few of the book’s 1,000 exciting shots of actors, actresses, and highlight scenes from the year’s domestic and foreign movies.

All important statistics are included, with photographs for each movie: cast lists, producers, directors, studios, costume designers, composers, release dates, color production, writers, and many other valuable facts. Academy Award winners are listed from 1927 to date. In addition, there is a section on obituaries, as well as a valuable index containing more than 5,000 entries.

Everyone interested in films, whether he sees them for entertainment or for serious study of the art of the cinema, will find this nineteenth annual a joy to browse through and an indispensable reference volume for checking thousands of facts and figures pertaining to the movies for this period.

Hardcover – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 631 g (22,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers & Publishers, inc., New York, New York, 1968

Screen World 1969 Film Annual, Volume 20
(John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1969Who are the top 25 box-office stars of this current movie season? Who are the most promising, up-and-coming personalities of the year? What famous actors and actresses died in 1968? All their photographs appear in this popular current annual, along with more than 1,000 profile and scene shots from both the domestic and the foreign films released in the United States during the year.

For an indispensable reference all important statistics are included, along with the photographs for each movie: cast lists, producers, directors, studios, costume designers, composers, release dates, color productions, writers, and many other valuable facts. Academy Award winners from 1927 to date are listed. There is an obituary section, as well as an extremely valuable index with more than 7,000 entries.

Everyone interested in films, whether he sees them for entertainment or for serious study of the art of the cinema, will find this twentieth annual a joy to browse through and an indispensable reference volume for checking thousands of facts and figures pertaining to the movies for this period.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 649 g (22,9 oz) – PUBLISHER Frederick Muller, 1969

Screen World 1969 Film Annual, Volume 20
(John Willis)

willis-john-screen-world-1969-2Who are the top 25 box-office stars of this current movie season? Who are the most promising, up-and-coming personalities of the year? What famous actors and actresses died in 1968? All their photographs appear in this popular current annual, along with more than 1,000 profile and scene shots from both the domestic and the foreign films released in the United States during the year.

For an indispensable reference all important statistics are included, along with the photographs for each movie: cast lists, producers, directors, studios, costume designers, composers, release dates, color productions, writers, and many other valuable facts. Academy Award winners from 1927 to date are listed. There is an obituary section, as well as an extremely valuable index with more than 7,000 entries.

Everyone interested in films, whether he sees them for entertainment or for serious study of the art of the cinema, will find this twentieth annual a joy to browse through and an indispensable reference volume for checking thousands of facts and figures pertaining to the movies for this period.

Hardcover – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 617 g (21,8 oz) – PUBLISHER Biblo & Tannen Booksellers & Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1969

Screen World 1970 Film Annual, Volume 21 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1970The current movie season was a particularly rewarding one, and this new volume presents many large pictorial spreads covering each of the hit films, including Midnight Cowboy, Anne of the Thousand Days, Hello, Dolly!, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Z, They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?, Alice’s Restaurant, and many more. In all, there are more than 1,000 profile and scene shots from both the domestic and foreign films released in the United States during the year.

For an indispensable reference all important statistics are included, along with the photographs for each movie: cast lists, producers, directors, studios, costume designers, composers, release dates, color productions, writers, and many other valuable facts. Academy Award winners from 1927 to date are listed. There is an obituary section, as well as an extremely valuable index with more than 7,000 entries.

Everyone interested in films, whether he sees them for entertainment or for serious study of the art of the cinema, will find this twenty-first annual a joy to browse through and an indispensable reference volume for checking thousands of facts and figures pertaining to the movies for this period.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 652 g (23,0 oz) – PUBLISHER Crown Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1970

Screen World 1971 Film Annual, Volume 22 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1971Today movies are the most talked-about, controversial branch of the performing arts, and the year 1971 provided us with some of the most highly esteemed cinematic masterpieces of recent times. The 1971 Screen World once again documents the past movie season with lavishly illustrated spreads covering all the major films. More than 1,000 profile and scene shots of films from Europe and the United States are included, representing such popular productions as Women in Love, Fellini Satyricon, and Five Easy Pieces, and such contemporary films as M*A*S*H, Woodstock, Getting Straight, Zabriskie Point, and Catch-22.

Screen World is a valuable reference containing pertinent information about cast lists, costume designers, producers, directors, studios, composers, release dates, color productions, writers, and other vital statistics. There are also an index with more than 8,000 entries, an obituary section, a listing of Academy Award winners from 1927, and notes on promising new personalities of the year.

Thousands of facts and figures pertaining to the world of film are here, available for the professional critic, serious student of the cinema, or movie buff to browse through for information, enjoyment, or reminiscence. Screen World, an annual favorite, is a delightful source book for all people interested in the modern film.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 667 g (23,5 oz) – PUBLISHER Crown Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1971

Screen World 1972 Film Annual, Volume 23 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1972This new, long-awaited edition of Screen World will entrance all movie lovers with its up-to-the-minute information, featuring all of the year’s most talked about actors and films, such as: Jack Nicholson and Ann-Margret in Carnal Knowledge; Fiddler on the Roof, with Topol, Glenda Jackson and Peter Finch in Sunday Bloody Sunday; Woody Allen in Bananas; The Last Picture Show, Summer of 42, and Shaft.

This internationally famous pictorial and statistical record of last year’s movies, now in its twenty-third year, is sure to delight everyone interested in this most versatile and fascinating art form. Packed with dramatic photographs from virtually every domestic and foreign movie shown in the United States, it presents exciting scene shots, vivid close-ups, and portraits of top movie stars. Loaded with important statistics, plus an 8,000-entry index, it has every fact the movie historian or buff needs to satisfy his interest.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 261 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 723 g (25,5 oz) – PUBLISHER Crown Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1972 – ISBN – 0-517-501287

Screen World 1973 Film Annual, Volume 24 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1973Here is the new, long-awaited edition of Screen World, the famous pictorial and statistical record of the current movie season. All movie lovers will appreciate its extensive coverage of such outstanding screen productions as the Academy Award winning The Godfather, with Marlon Brando; Cabaret, with Oscar-winners Liza Minnelli and Joel Grey; What’s Up Doc? with Barbra Streisand; Lady Sings the Blues with Diana Ross; such foreign films as The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie and Cries and Whispers; musicals such as Man of La Mancha and 1776; and Deliverance, Sounder, The Emigrants, The Poseidon Adventure, Superfly, The Heartbreak Kid, and many more.

This internationally known pictorial and factual account of today’s movies, now in its twenty-fourth year, is sure to delight all who are captivated by this most exciting and creative art form. Packed with dramatic photographs from virtually every domestic and foreign movie shown in the United States, it presents exciting scene shots, vivid close-ups, and portraits of top movie stars. Crammed with vital statistics, plus an 8,000-entry index, it has every fact the movie historian or buff needs to satisfy his interest.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 255 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 663 g (23,4 oz) – PUBLISHER Crown Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1973 – ISBN 0-517-504154

Screen World 1974 Film Annual, Volume 25 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1974This is the 25th anniversary issue of the famous annual pictorial and statistical record of the movie season. This new edition features such actors and films as: Marlon Brando In Last Tango in Paris, Elizabeth Taylor in Night Watch, Ryan O’Neal in Paper Moon, Paul Newman in Mackintosh Man, Jane Fonda in A Doll’s House, Gene Hackman and Al Pacino in Scarecrow, Charlton Heston in Soylent Green, Barbra Streisand and Robert Redford in The Way We Were, and many more.

This internationally known pictorial and factual account of today’s movies, now in its twenty-fifth year, is sure to delight all who are captivated by this most exciting and creative art form. Packed with dramatic photographs from virtually every domestic and foreign movie shown in the United States, it presents dramatic scene shots, vivid close-ups, and portraits of top movie stars. Crammed with vital statistics, plus an 8,000-entry index, it has every fact the movie historian or buff needs to satisfy his interest.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He is presently a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World and Dance World annuals.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 667 g (23,5 oz) – PUBLISHER Crown Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1974 – ISBN 0-517-515326

Screen World 1975 Film Annual, Volume 26 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1975For over a quarter of a century, this famous pictorial and statistical annual of the current movie season has shown memorable scenes from virtually every domestic and foreign movie shown in the United States, including vivid close-ups and full-page portraits of top movie stars. Here are all the important facts, plus a 9,000-entry index to cover everything in the movie world this year.

Screen World‘s newest edition features such films as the much-discussed new version of Murder on the Orient Express, with its all-star cast; Godfather, Part II; Airport ’75; Earthquake; The Towering Inferno; and The Front Page. John Willis includes such excellent foreign films as Scenes from a Marriage and The Night Porter, as well as such domestic hits as The Odessa File and The Trial of Billy Jack. Here are the stars of today: Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway in Chinatown, Art Carney in Harry and Tonto, Sidney Poitier and Harry Belafonte in Uptown Saturday Night, George C. Scott in Bank Shot, Elliott Gould and George Segal in California Split, Jon Voight in Conrack, and Carroll O’Connor in Law and Disorder. This edition of Screen World, packed with valuable information and photographs, will prove indispensable to all critics, movie historians, and film buffs.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He is presently a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World and Dance World annuals.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 663 g (23,4 oz) – PUBLISHER Crown Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1975 – ISBN 0-517-521024

Screen World 1976 Film Annual, Volume 27 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1976For over a quarter of a century, this famous pictorial and statistical annual of the current movie season has shown memorable scenes from the best and most popular domestic and foreign films shown in the United States, including vivid close-ups and full-page portraits of top movie stars. Here are all the important facts, plus a 10,000-entry index to cover everything in the movie world this year.

Screen World‘s newest edition features such films, actors, and actresses as the blockbuster Jaws; Tommy; Nashville; and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. John Willis includes such excellent foreign films as A Pain in the A–; A Brief Vacation; and Swept Away; as well as such domestic hits as French Connection II. Here are the stars of today: Barbra Streisand in Funny Lady, Warren Beatty in Shampoo, Woody Allen in Love and Death, Paul Newman in The Drowning Pool, Al Pacino in Dog Day Afternoon, and Robert Redford and Faye Dunaway in Three Days of the Condor.

This edition of Screen World, packed with valuable information and photographs, will prove indispensable to all critics, movie historians, and film buffs.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee,  Indiana, and Harvard universities. He is presently a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World and Dance World annuals.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 669 g (23,6 oz) – PUBLISHER Crown Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1976 – ISBN 0-517-525836

Screen World 1977 Film Annual, Volume 28 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1977Today more than ever the magic of the motion picture has worked its spell on everyone in the country, as movies continue to generate more and more excitement every year. For almost thirty years this famous pictorial and statistical annual of the current movie season has shown favorite scenes from our finest domestic and foreign films. Here are close-ups of all our most beloved screen actors and portraits of top box-office draws.

This exciting new volume highlights Sylvester Stallone in Rocky, Robert De Niro in Taxi Driver, Dustin Hoffman and Robert Redford in All the President’s Men, and Karen Black in Family Plot. Other great performances of the year included in this edition of Screen World are Laurence Olivier and Dustin Hoffman in Marathon Man, Marlon Brando and Jack Nicholson in The Missouri Breaks, and Sissy Spacek in Carrie. Some of the wonderful films we saw last year that we’ll all want to remember that are immortalized in this book are Logan’s Run, The Omen, The Bad News Bears, Network, A Star Is Born, Bound for Glory, King Kong, and That’s Entertainment, Part 2. And there are many fascinating foreign films included, such as Cousin, Cousine and Seven Beauties. For anyone who wants to relive this past movie season, and for all film enthusiasts, movie historians, and critics, Screen World, Volume 28 will prove an invaluable addition to its predecessors.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee,  Indiana, and Harvard universities. He is presently a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In  addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World and Dance World annuals.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 652 g (23,0 oz) – PUBLISHER Crown Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1977 – ISBN 0-517-52970X

Screen World 1978 Film Annual, Volume 29 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1978Today more than ever the magic of the motion picture has worked its spell on people throughout the world, as movies continue to generate more and more excitement every year. For almost thirty years Screen World, this famous pictorial and statistical annual of the current movie season, has shown favorite scenes from the finest domestic and foreign films. Here are close-ups of all our most beloved screen actors and portraits of top box-office draws.

This exciting new volume highlights Woody Allen and Diane Keaton in Annie Hall, Liv Ullmann, Laurence Olivier, and Robert Redford in A Bridge Too Far, Richard Burton in Equus, Jane Fonda and George Segal in Fun with Dick and Jane, and Peter Sellers in The Pink Panther Strikes Again. Other great performances of the year included in this edition of Screen World are Alec Guinness, Carrie Fisher, and Mark Hamill in Star Wars, John Travolta in Saturday Night Fever, George Bums and John Denver in Oh, God!, and Nick Nolte and Jacqueline Bisset in The Deep. For anyone who wants to relive this past movie season, and for all film enthusiasts, movie historians, and critics, Screen World, Volume 29, will prove an invaluable addition to its predecessors.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New  York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World and Dance World annuals.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 255 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 666 g (23,5 oz) – PUBLISHER Crown Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1978 – ISBN 0-517-534517

Screen World 1979 Film Annual, Volume 30 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1979Celebrating its thirtieth year, Screen World in this new edition shows memorable scenes from every important film, foreign and domestic, released in the United States this past season. This famous pictorial and statistical annual contains vivid close-ups and full-page portraits of our top actors and actresses, along with a 10,000-entry index to cover everything in the movie world today. The great variety and scope of photographs and facts collected here testify to the continuing popularity of the motion picture in our culture.

This new volume of Screen World features such outstanding films as Woody Allen’s Interiors, Days of Heaven, Warren Beatty’s Heaven Can Wait, and Superman. Here are the exciting stars of today: John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John in Grease; Jane Fonda and Jon Voight in Coming Home; Jill Clayburgh in An Unmarried Woman; Robert De Niro, Meryl Streep, and Christopher Walken in the year’s best picture, The Deer Hunter. This edition includes such notable foreign films as Bread and Chocolate, Get Out Your Handkerchiefs, Autumn Sonata with Ingrid Bergman and Liv Ullmann, and Madame Rosa with Simone Signoret. Film buffs, historians, and critics will all find Screen World, Volume 30, an indispensable guide to the 1978 movie season.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World and Dance World annuals.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 254 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 697 g (24,6 oz) – PUBLISHER Crown Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1979 – ISBN 0-517-538350

Screen World 1980 Film Annual, Volume 31 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1980Acclaimed by critics and fans alike as the definitive statistical and pictorial movie record for over thirty years, Screen World, Volume 31, covers every significant motion picture, foreign and domestic, released in this country in 1979. John Willis’ renowned annual lists cast, producer, director, screenplay, photography, art and music credits for each film, besides providing a gallery of photos of promising new faces in the field, a special section on the year’s Academy Award winners, biographical data for all our leading actors and actresses, and a 10,000-entry index. Every bit of information the aficionado would want is included in this volume.

Screen World, Volume 31, features such box-office hits as Alien, Star Trek – The Movie, Breaking Away, Woody Allen’s Manhattan, and “10,” which introduced Bo Derek. Here are the notable performances of such popular stars as Jack Lemmon and Jane Fonda in The China Syndrome, Peter Sellers and Shirley MacLaine in Being There, Sally Field in Norma Rae, Marlon Brando in Apocalypse Now, and Dustin Hoffman and Meryl Streep in the Academy Award-winning Kramer vs. Kramer. Among distinguished foreign films are La Cage aux Folles with Ugo Tognazzi, Monty Python’s Life of Brian, and Peppermint Soda. The great talent and craft displayed in these and other films in this edition give ample proof of the excitement and vigor of the movie industry today.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World and Dance World annuals.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 255 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 677 g (23,9 oz) – PUBLISHER Crown Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1980 – ISBN 0-517-541408

Screen World 1981 Film Annual, Volume 32 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1981For over thirty years film buffs have regarded Screen World as the definitive guide to the past movie season. This latest volume continues the illustrious tradition, covering every important domestic and foreign film released in the United States in 1980. Vivid photos include scenes from each major motion picture, full-page shots of Academy Award-winning actors and actresses, and close-ups of promising new faces. Along with complete listings of cast, producer, director, screenplay, photography, art and music credits, there are special biographical and obituary sections, and a 10,000-entry index.

John Willis’ Screen World, Volume 32, highlights such hits as The Empire Strikes Back, Airplane, Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining, and Any Which Way You Can with perennial favorite Clint Eastwood. Also featured are such popular stars as Mary Tyler Moore and Donald Sutherland in the year’s Best Picture, Ordinary People, Robert De Niro in Raging Bull, Sissy Spacek in Coal Miners Daughter, and Shelley Duvall and Robin Williams in Popeye. Notable foreign films include Tess with Nastasia Kinski, My Brilliant Career, Kagemusha, and Breaker Morant. For everyone devoted to film, whether fan, critic, or historian, this new volume will take an honored place next to its renowned predecessors in the series on the movie bookshelf.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World annual.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 717 g (25,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Crown Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1981 – ISBN 0-517-544822

Screen World 1982 Film Annual, Volume 33 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1982For a third of a century Screen World has stood as the definitive record of the past movie season. This current volume covers every significant American and foreign film released in the United States in 1981, each illustrated with an array of fascinating photographs. John Willis’s critically and popularly acclaimed annual provides cast, producer, director, screenplay, photography, art and music credits for each motion picture, along with biographical and obituary information, and a 10,000-entry index. Special sections highlight the year’s Academy Award winners, promising new actors and actresses, and the top twenty-five box-office stars of 1981.

Screen World, Volume 33, features such noteworthy hits as Raiders of the Lost Ark, Superman 2, Arthur, and the year’s Best Picture, Chariots of Fire. Memorable performances include Burt Lancaster and Susan Sarandon in Atlantic City; Katharine Hepburn and Henry and Jane Fonda in On Golden Pond; Warren Beatty, Maureen Stapleton, and Jack Nicholson in Reds, and Steve Martin in Pennies from Heaven. Among outstanding foreign films are Napoleon, The French Lieutenant’s Woman with Jeremy Irons and Meryl Streep, Gallipoli, and Stevie with Glenda Jackson. All film buffs, critics and fans alike, will welcome Screen World, Volume 33, as an essential reference for their movie library.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World annual.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 681 g (24 oz) – PUBLISHER Frederick Muller, London, 1982 – ISBN 0-584-95038-1

Screen World 1983 Film Annual, Volume 34 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1983This latest volume in the acclaimed Screen World series covers every significant domestic and foreign film released in the United States in 1982, one of the most memorable years for movies in recent times. Vivid photographs include scenes from each major motion picture, full-page shots of Academy Award winning actors and actresses, close-ups of promising new faces, and the top twenty-five box-office stars of 1982. Along with complete listings of cast, producer, director, screenplay, photography, art and music credits, John Willis provides special biography and obituary sections, and a 10,000-entry index.

Screen World, Volume 34, features such outstanding films and performers as the Academy Awards’ Best Picture Gandhi with Best Actor Ben Kingsley, Sophie’s Choice with Best Actress Meryl Streep, Tootsie with Dustin Hoffman and Jessica Lange, Steven Spielberg’s E.T.: The Extraterrestrial, My Favorite Year with Peter O’Toole, The Verdict with Paul Newman, Missing with Jack Lemmon, Rocky III with Sylvester Stallone, Victor / Victoria with Julie Andrews, and Diner. Among notable foreign films are The Road Warrior with Mel Gibson, Gregory’s Girl, Das Boot, Siberiade, and Diva. Everyone devoted to film – whether fan, critic, or historian – will find Screen World, Volume 34, an essential reference and an entertaining souvenir of 1982’s movie season.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World annual.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 661 g (23,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Frederick Muller, London, 1983 – ISBN 0-584-95059-4

Screen World 1984 Film Annual, Volume 35 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1984Since 1949 film buffs have regarded Screen World as the definitive guide to the past movie season. This latest volume continues the illustrious tradition, covering every important domestic and foreign film released in the United States in 1983. Vivid photographs include scenes from each major motion picture, full-page shots of Academy Award-winning actors and actresses, and close-ups of promising new faces. Along with complete listings of cast, producer, director, screenplay, photography, art and music credits, there are special biographical and obituary sections, and a 10,000-entry index.

Screen World, Volume 35, highlights such hits as Return of the Jedi, Flashdance, The Big Chill, WarGames, Risky Business, and The Right Stuff. Also featured are such popular stars as Shirley MacLaine and Jack Nicholson in the year’s Best Picture, Terms of Endearment, Ben Kingsley and Jeremy Irons in Betrayal, Eddie Murphy in Trading Places, Barbra Streisand in Yentl, and Woody Allen in Zelig. Notable foreign films include Ingmar Bergman ‘s Fanny and Alexander, The Year of Living Dangerously with Australian star Mel Gibson and Sigourney Weaver, Educating Rita with Michael Caine, and Carmen. All film buffs, critics, and fans alike will welcome Screen World, Volume 35, as an essential reference for their movie library.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World annual.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 684 g (24,1 oz) – PUBLISHER Frederick Muller, London, 1984 – ISBN 0-584-95070-5

Screen World 1985 Film Annual, Volume 36 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1985Since 1949 Screen World has stood as the definitive record of the past movie season. This current volume covers every significant American and foreign film released in the United States in 1984. Vivid photographs include scenes from each major motion picture, full-page shots of Academy Award-winning actors and actresses, and close-ups of promising new faces. Along with complete listings of cast, producer, director, screenplay, photography, art, and music credits, there are special biographical and obituary sections, and a 10,000-entry index.

Screen World, Volume 36, highlights such hits as A Passage to India, Ghostbusters, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Beverly Hills Cop, Splash, Police Academy, and the year’s Best Picture, Amadeus. Memorable performances include Sam Shepard and Jessica Lange in Country, Steve Martin and Lily Tomlin in All of Me, and Sally Field in Places in the Heart. Among notable foreign films are Greystoke, The Gods Must Be Crazy, Love in Germany, The Killing Fields, and The Bostonians with Vanessa Redgrave.

Everyone devoted to film – whether fan, critic, or historian – will find Screen World, Volume 36, an essential reference and an entertaining souvenir of the 1984 movie season.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World annual.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 263 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 708 g (25 oz) – PUBLISHER Crown Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1985 – ISBN 0-517-55821-1

Screen World 1986 Film Annual, Volume 37 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1986Since 1949 Screen World has been acclaimed as the definitive record of the past movie season. This current volume covers every significant American and foreign film released in the United States in 1985. Vivid photographs include scenes from each major motion picture, full-page shots of Academy Award-winning actors and actresses, and close-ups of promising new faces. Along with complete listings of cast, producer, director, screenplay, photography, art, and music credits, there are special biographical and obituary sections, and a 10,000-entry index.

Screen World, Volume 37, highlights such hits as Rambo Part II, with Sylvester Stallone; Prizzi’s Honor, with Jack Nicholson and Kathleen Turner; White Nights, with Mikhail Baryshnikov and Gregory Hines; Pale Rider, with Clint Eastwood; Out of Africa, with Meryl Streep and Robert Redford; Agnes of God, with Jane Fonda; A Chorus Line, Brewster’s Millions, and Woody Allen’s Purple Rose of Cairo. Everyone devoted to film – whether fan, critic, or historian – will find Screen World, Volume 37, an essential reference and an entertaining souvenir of the 1985 movie season.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World annual.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 269 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 720 g (25,4 oz) – PUBLISHER Crown Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1986 – ISBN 0-517-56257-X

Screen World 1987 Film Annual, Volume 38 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1987Since 1949 Screen World has been acclaimed as the definitive record of the past movie season. This current volume covers every significant film released in the United States in 1986. Vivid photographs include scenes from each major motion picture, full-page shots of Academy Award-winning actors and actresses, and close-ups of promising new faces. Along with complete listings of cast, producer, director, screenplay, photography, art, and music credits, there are special biographical and obituary sections, and a 10,000-entry index.

Screen World, Volume 38, highlights many hits only released in the UK during 1987 – such as The Color of Money with Paul Newman and Tom Cruise, Crocodile Dundee with Paul Hogan, Name of the Rose with Sean Connery, Platoon, Peggy Sue Got Married, Blue Velvet, and many other popular movies. The Screen World series is an essential and entertaining reference book – for fan and critic alike.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World annual.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 269 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 764 g (26,9 oz) – PUBLISHER Frederick Muller, London, 1987 – ISBN 0-09-173564-5

Screen World 1988 Film Annual, Volume 39 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1988Since 1949 Screen World has been acclaimed as the definitive record of the past movie season. This current volume covers every significant American and foreign film released in the United States in 1987. Vivid photographs include scenes from each major motion picture, full-page shots of Academy Award-winning actors and actresses, and close-ups of promising new faces. Along with complete listings of cast, producer, director, screenplay, photography, art and music credits, there are special biographical and obituary sections, and a 10,000-entry index.

Screen World 1988, Volume 39, features such hits as Moonstruck with Cher and Nicolas Cage, Fatal Attraction with Michael Douglas and Glenn Close, and The Whales of August with Lillian Gish and Bette Davis. Other highlight movies include Dirty Dancing with Patrick Swayze and Jennifer Grey, Radio Days by Woody Allen, Weeds with Nick Nolte, The Glass Menagerie directed by Paul Newman and starring Joanne Woodward, and John Huston’s last film, The Dead. Leading the foreign films section are Babette’s Feast and Maurice. Everyone devoted to film – whether fan, critic, or historian – will find Screen World, Volume 39, an essential reference and an entertaining album of the 1987 movie season.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World annual.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 272 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 762 g (26,9 oz) – PUBLISHER Frederick Muller, London, 1988 – ISBN 0-09-173790-7

Screen World 1989 Film Annual, Volume 40 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1989Since 1949, Screen World has been acclaimed as the definitive record of the past movie season. This current volume covers every significant American and foreign film released in the United States in 1988. Vivid photographs include scenes from each major motion picture, full-page shots of Academy Award-winning actors and actresses, and close-ups of promising new faces. Along with complete listings of casts, producers, directors, screenplays, photography, art and music credits, there are special biographical and obituary sections, and a 10,000-entry index.

Screen World 1989, Volume 40, features such hits as Big with Tom Hanks and Elizabeth Perkins, Rain Man with Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise, Who Framed Roger Rabbit? with Bob Hoskins and Roger Rabbit, Clara’s Heart with Whoopi Goldberg, The Good Mother with Diane Keaton, The Accused with Jodie Foster and Kelly McGillis, Coming to America with Eddie Murphy, and Mystic Pizza with Julia Roberts. Leading the foreign films section is Madame Sousatzka with Shirley MacLaine, A Cry in the Dark with Meryl Streep, and A World Apart with Barbara Hershey. Everyone devoted to film – whether fan, critic, or historian – will find Screen World, Volume 40, an essential reference and an entertaining album of the 1988 movie season.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World annual.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 272 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 772 g (27,2 oz) – PUBLISHER Frederick Muller, London, 1989 – ISBN 0-09-174489-X

Screen World 1990 Film Annual, Volume 41 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1990Since 1949, Screen World has been acclaimed as the definitive record of the past movie season. This current volume covers every significant American and foreign film released in the United States in 1989. Vivid photographs include scenes from each major motion picture, full-page shots of Academy Award-winning actors and actresses, and close-ups of promising new faces. Along with complete listings of casts, producers, directors, screenplays, photography, and art and music credits, there are special biographical and obituary sections, and a 10,000-entry index.

Volume 41 features such notable films as Driving Miss Daisy with Jessica Tandy; Field of Dreams with Kevin Costner; Batman with Jack Nicholson and Michael Keaton; When Harry Met Sally… with Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan; Parenthood with Steve Martin; Born on the Fourth of July with Tom Cruise; sex, lies and videotape with Andie MacDowell, Peter Gallagher, and James Spader; Sea of Love with Al Pacino; and Dead Poets Society with Robin Williams. Eyeryone devoted to film – whether fan, critic, or historian – will find Screen World, Volume 41, an essential reference and an entertaining album of the 1989 movie season.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World annual.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 269 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 775 g (27,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Frederick Muller, London, 1990 – ISBN 0-09-174822-4

Screen World 1991 Film Annual, Volume 42 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1991Movie fans eagerly await each year’s new edition of Screen World, the definitive record of the cinema since 1949. Volume 42 provides an illustrated listing of American and foreign films released in the United States in 1990, all documented in more than 1,000 photographs.

The 1991 edition of Screen World features such notable films as Dances with Wolves with Kevin Costner, Pretty Woman with Richard Gere and Julia Roberts, The Hunt for Red October with Sean Connery, Dick Tracy with Warren Beatty and Madonna, Total Recall with Arnold Schwarzenegger, Ghost with Patrick Swayze and Whoopi Goldberg, Presumed Innocent with Harrison Ford, Postcards from the Edge with Meryl Streep and Shirley MacLaine, Goodfellas with Robert De Niro, Reversal of Fortune with Jeremy Irons and Glenn Close, Mr. and Mrs. Bridge with Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward, and The Bonfire of the Vanities with Tom Hanks and Bruce Willis.

As always, Screen World‘s outstanding features include photographic stills and complete credits from the films, biographical notes on selected individuals, full-page shots of Academy Award-winning actors, and a look at the year’s most promising new screen personalities.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World annual.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 268 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 764 g (26,9 oz) – PUBLISHER Hutchinson, London, 1991 – ISBN 0-09-174822-4

Screen World 1992 Film Annual, Volume 43 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1992Movie fans eagerly await each year’s new edition of Screen World, the definitive record of the cinema since 1949. Volume 43 provides an illustrated listing of American and foreign films released in the United States in 1991, all documented in more than 1,000 photographs.

The 1992 edition of Screen World features such notable films as Silence of the Lambs with Anthony Hopkins and Jodie Foster, The Prince of Tides with Barbra Streisand and Nick Nolte, Thelma and Louise with Susan Sarandon and Geena Davis, Terminator 2: Judgement Day with Arnold Schwarzenegger, Bugsy with Warren Beatty, Cape Fear with Robert De Niro, The Addams Family with Anjelica Huston and Raul Julia, Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country with William Shatner and Leonard Nimoy, The Fisher King with Robin Williams and Jeff Bridges, Dead Again with Kenneth Branagh and Emma Thompson, JFK with Kevin Costner, and Beauty and the Beast.

As always, Screen World‘s outstanding features include photographic stills and complete credits from the films, biographical notes on selected individuals, full-age shots of Academy Award-winning actors, and a look at the year’s most promising new screen personalities.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World annual.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 288 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 680 g (24 oz) – PUBLISHER Applause, New York, New York, 1993 – ISBN 1-55783-135-1

Screen World 1993 Film Annual, Volume 44 (John Willis)

Willis, John - Screen World 1993Movie fans eagerly await each year’s new edition of Screen World, the definitive record of the cinema since 1949. Volume 44 provides an illustrated listing of American and foreign films released in the United States in 1992, all documented in more than 1,000 photographs.

The 1993 edition of Screen World features such notable films as Clint Eastwood’s Academy Award-winning Unforgiven, Howard’s End with Emma Thompson and Anthony Hopkins, A Few Good Men with Tom Cruise and Jack Nicholson, Basic Instinct with Michael Douglas and Sharon Stone, Scent of a Woman with Al Pacino, The Crying Game with Stephen Rea, A League of Their Own with Geena Davis and Tom Hanks, Bram Stoker’s Dracula with Gary Oldman and Winona Ryder, House Sitter with Steve Martin and Goldie Hawn, the Disney musicals Newsies and Alladin, My Cousin Vinnie with Joe Pesci, Mr. Saturday Night with Billy Crystal, The Player with Tim Robbins, Peter’s Friends with Kenneth Branagh, and Sister Act with Whoopi Goldberg.

As always, Screen World‘s outstanding features include photographic stills and complete credits from the films, biographical notes on selected individuals, full-age shots of Academy Award-winning actors, and a look at the year’s most promising new screen personalities.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World annual.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 304 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 17 cm (9,3 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 763 g (26,9 oz) – PUBLISHER Applause, New York, New York, 1994 – ISBN 1-55783-175-0

Screen World 1994 Film Annual, Volume 45 (John Willis with Barry Monush)

Willis, John - Screen World 1994Movie fans eagerly await each year’s new edition of Screen World, the definitive record of the cinema since 1949. Volume 45 provides an illustrated listing of American and foreign films released in the United States in 1993, all documented in more than 1,000 photographs.

The 1994 edition of Screen World features such notable films as Steven Spielberg’s Academy Award-winning Schindler’s List, Remains of the Day with Emma Thompson and Anthony Hopkins, Philadelphia with Tom Hanks, The Fugitive with Harrison Ford and Tommy Lee Jones, The Piano with Holly Hunter and Anna Paquin, The Firm with Tom Cruise, Mrs. Doubtfire with Robin Williams, Addams Family Values with Raul Julia and Anjelica Huston, In the Name of the Father with Daniel Day-Lewis, Sommersby with Richard Gere and Jodie Foster, In the Line of Fire with Clint Eastwood, Sleepless in Seattle with Meg Ryan and Tom Hanks, What’s Love Got to Do With It? with Angela Bassett and Laurence Fishburne, Dave with Kevin Kline and Sigourney Weaver, Falling Down with Michael Douglas and Much Ado About Nothing with Kenneth Branagh and Emma Thompson.

As always, Screen World‘s outstanding features include photographic stills and complete credits from the films, biographical notes on selected individuals, full-age shots of Academy Award-winning actors, and a look at the year’s most promising new screen personalities.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World annual.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 352 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 20 cm (9,3 x 7,9 inch) – Weight 1.010 g (35,6 oz) – PUBLISHER Applause, New York, New York, 1995 – ISBN 1-55783-201-3

Screen World 1995 Film Annual, Volume 46 (John Willis with Barry Monush)

Willis, John - Screen World 1995Movie fans eagerly await each year’s new edition of Screen World, the definitive record of the cinema since 1949. Volume 46 provides an illustrated listing of American and foreign films released in the United States in 1994, all documented in more than 1,000 photographs.

The 1995 edition of Screen World features such notable films as the Academy Award-winning Forrest Gump, The Shawshank Redemption with Morgan Freeman and Tim Robbins, Blue Sky with Jessica Lange and Tommy Lee Jones, Clear and Present Danger with Harrison Ford, Little Women with Susan Sarandon and Winona Ryder, The Mask with Jim Carrey, The Madness of King George with Nigel Hawthome and Helen Mirren, Star Trek Generations with William Shatner and Patrick Stewart, The Santa Clause with Tim Allen, Ed Wood with Johnny Depp and Martin Landau, Bullets Over Broadway with Dianne Wiest, When a Man Loves a Woman with Meg Ryan and Andy Garcia, and Pulp Fiction with John Travolta and Samuel L. Jackson.

As always, Screen World‘s outstanding features include photographic stills and complete credits from the films, biographical notes on selected individuals, full-age shots of Academy Award-winning actors, and a look at the year’s most promising new screen personalities.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World annual.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 320 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 20 cm (9,3 x 7,9 inch) – Weight 923 g (32,6 oz) – PUBLISHER Applause, New York, New York, 1995 – ISBN 1-55783-201-3

Screen World 1996 Film Annual, Volume 47 (John Willis with Barry Monush)

Willis, John - Screen World 1996Movie fans eagerly await each year’s new edition of Screen World, the definitive record of the cinema since 1949. Volume 47 provides an illustrated listing of American and foreign films released in the United States in 1995, all documented in more than 1,000 photographs.

The 1996 edition of Screen World features such notable films as the Academy Award-winning Braveheart, Leaving Las Vegas with Nicholas Cage and Elizabeth Shue, Dead Man Walking with Susan Sarandon and Sean Penn, Nixon with Anthony Hopkins, Waiting to Exhale with Whitney Houston and Angela Bassett, Apollo 13 with Tom Hanks, Sense and Sensibility with Emma Thompson and Kate Winslet, Toy Story, Casino with Robert De Niro and Sharon Stone, Golden Eye with Pierce Brosnan, Mighty Aphrodite with Mira Sorvino, The Usual Suspects with Kevin Spacey, and Batman Forever with Val Kilmer and Jim Carrey.

As always, Screen World‘s outstanding features include photographic stills and complete credits from the films, biographical notes on selected individuals, full-age shots of Academy Award-winning actors, and a look at the year’s most promising new screen personalities.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World annual.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 336 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 20 cm (9,3 x 7,9 inch) – Weight 941 g (33,2 oz) – PUBLISHER Applause, New York, New York, 1996 – ISBN 1-55783-252-8

Screen World 1997 Film Annual, Volume 48 (John Willis with Barry Monush)

Willis, John - Screen World 1997Movie fans eagerly await each year’s new edition of Screen World, the definitive record of the cinema since 1949. Volume 48 provides an illustrated listing of American and foreign films released in the United States in 1996, all documented in more than 1,000 photographs.

The 1997 edition of Screen World features such notable films as the Academy Award-winning The English Patient, Shine with Geoffrey Rush, Fargo with Frances McDormand, Jerry Maguire with Tom Cruise and Cuba Gooding Jr., The Birdcage with Nathan Lane and Robin Williams, The Nutty Professor with Eddie Murphy, Sling Blade with Billy Bob Thornton, Independence Day, William Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet with Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes, 101 Dalmatians with Glenn Close, Scream with Neve Campbell and Drew Barrymore, Emma with Gwyneth Paltrow and Ransom with Mel Gibson.

As always, Screen World‘s outstanding features include photographic stills and complete credits from the films, biographical notes on selected individuals, full-age shots of Academy Award-winning actors, and a look at the year’s most promising new screen personalities.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World annual.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 336 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 20 cm (9,3 x 7,9 inch) – Weight 919 g (32,4 oz) – PUBLISHER Applause, New York, New York, 1997 – ISBN 1-55783-320-6

Screen World 1998 Film Annual, Volume 49 (John Willis with Barry Monush)

Willis, John - Screen World 1998Movie fans eagerly await each year’s new edition of Screen World, the definitive record of the cinema since 1949. Volume 49 provides an illustrated listing of American and foreign films released in the United States in 1997, all documented in more than 1,000 photographs.

The 1998 edition of Screen World features such notable films as the Academy Award-winning Titanic with Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet, As Good As It Gets with Jack Nicholson and Helen Hunt, Good Will Hunting with Matt Damon and Robin Williams, Men in Black with Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones, Soul Food with Vanessa L. Williams and Viveca A. Fox, The Lost World: Jurassic Park with Jeff Goldblum, Donnie Brasco with Al Pacino and Johnny Depp, Anastasia, Boogie Nights with Mark Wahlberg and Burt Reynolds, In & Out with Kevin Kline, Amistad with Morgan Freeman and Anthony Hopkins, Air Force One with Harrison Ford, and Liar Liar with Jim Carrey.

As always, Screen World‘s outstanding features include photographic stills and complete credits from the films, biographical notes on selected individuals, full-age shots of Academy Award-winning actors, and a look at the year’s most promising new screen personalities.

JOHN WILLIS is a graduate of Milligan College and did graduate work at Tennessee, Indiana, and Harvard universities. He was formerly a teacher of English in the New York City public high schools. He has also been an actor, director, and teacher of drama. In addition to this series, he is editor of the Theatre World annual.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 336 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 20 cm (9,3 x 7,9 inch) – Weight 945 g (33,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Applause, New York, New York, 1998 – ISBN 1-55783-341-9

The Screwball Comedy Films: A History and Filmography, 1934-1942 (Duane Byrge, Robert Milton Miller; foreword by Arthur Knight)

byrge-duane-the-screwball-comedy-film“No one who survived the Great Depression of the 1930s can look back on those years with any real affection. In the face of bread lines, Hoovervilles, and hunger marches, few could accept such musical exhortations as Stand Up and Cheer (‘good times are here’) or We’re in the Money or even Happy Days Are Here Again. We may have heard them and whistled them, but we certainly didn’t believe them. Not that this lessened the popularity of the movie musicals that propounded them. In those grim days, any ray of hope was worth hanging onto. But the fact is we knew those hopes were false and resented them, even though we were loathe to reject them outright. (Interestingly, such overtly Depression numbers as Ten Cents a Dance or Brother, Can You Spare a Dime? were equally popular with the mass audience.)

Many persist, quite correctly, in seeing the movies as one of the few stabilizing influences during those terrible times. Quite apart from whatever messages they may have delivered (and the ‘message movie’ was every bit as suspect then as it is now), where else could a thin dime buy you not only three hours of escape from economic or domestic woes, but also the physical comfort of a warm place in winter and a cool place in the summer? There were those poor souls who actually used their local picture palaces as short-term flop houses. All this and a double feature as well!

I once wrote that movies, like bananas, come in bunches. Never was this more apparent than in the early years of the Depression, as the film companies fought desperately to hold onto their nouveau poor customers. When gangster movies took hold, the studios complied with a veritable deluge of them – 51 in 1931 alone. Then came newspaper stories, prison stories, ‘true confession’ stories, and a sudden rash of backstage musicals featuring hundreds of scantily clad chorus girls in settings more elaborate than any theater since Rome’s Colosseum could possibly contain. By their very nature, these cycles tended to be intensive but short-lived. Even the entertainment-hungry audiences of the Depression could become sated by too much of a good thing.

What Duane Byrge and Robert Milton Miller remind us in this scrupulously researched volume is that, unlike previous cycles and genres, screwball comedy was not an overnight phenomenon, nor did it arrive fully blown and ready for instant Xeroxing. Perhaps that also explains its relatively long hold on the public, roughly from 1934 to 1942. During those years, the whole idea of screwball was constantly changing, defining itself more as an attitude than as a specific type of subject. Significantly, the term itself wasn’t even invented until a year or so after the genre had begun.

It Happened One Night, on the only hand, even though it came at the end of a rather dreary succession of romances that took place on a bus, immediately commanded attention because its outlook was so markedly different. An heiress runs away from her marriage to a stuffed shirt. A sardonic newspaper man is (at least at first) less interested in the girl than in the reward – and his story. It is only when both of them discover that, despite their differences in social and economic status, they are really very human beings that the walls of Jericho begin to crumble. Even the girl’s crusty multi-millionaire father turns out to be human. And audiences loved it, loved them.

For me, that’s the whole secret of the screwball’s success. Its rich people were always human – if also somewhat fatuous. It was an image that both delighted and enheartened the impoverished and hungry. As with Charlie Chaplin, it was the rich seen from the perspective of the poor, and with the same often hilarious results. One always enjoys seeing the wealthy brought down a peg, the weaknesses of the powerful exposed. If they can be made human as well, they become more credible, more believable, and hence more effective as symbols of a class that was both hated and envied in the Depression years. The irony is that, invariably, sympathy was built up for these irascible moguls (usually played by the likes of Edward Arnold, Walter Connolly, and Eugene Pallette), so much so that by the end of the movie the audiences were more than willing to forgive and forget their overbearing ways. They were, after all, only human.” – From The Foreword by Arthur Knight.

My Man Godfrey, Four’s a Crowd, My Favorite Wife, The Devil and Miss Jones – for their inspired blend of slapstick humor with casual elegance and witty repartee, these movies are examples of what became known as “screwball” comedies. This study focuses on the genre, film-by-film, year-by-year, providing the film enthusiast or serious researcher with an informed guide to the screen offerings of the era.

Each of the major contributors is profiled, from directors (such as Frank Capra, Howard Hawks, Leo McCarey or Gregory LaCava) to writers (Ben Hecht, Norman Krasna, Billy Wilder, and others) to the inspired lunacy of performers (Cary Grant, Carole Lombard, Irene Dunne, or Fred MacMurray). The large filmography covers more than 50 films, appearing chronologically, and gives title, studio, date, time, director, producer, writers, source, photography, cast, plot description and background notes.

DUANE BYRGE is a film critic for The Hollywood Reporter in Los Angeles. He lives in Richmond, Virginia. ROBERT MILTON MILLER is an associate professor of communication studies at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, Illinois. He lives in DeKalb.

Hardcover – 146 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 15,5 cm (9,3 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 410 g (14,5 oz) – PUBLISHER St. James Press, London, 1991 – ISBN 1-55862-165-2

Screwball: Hollywood’s Madcap Romantic Comedies (Ed Sikow; foreword by Molly Haskell)

20160813_200416 2“The screwball comedies that flourished in the decade between the onset of the Depression and the end of World War II have left a mark on our memories far greater than could have been expected from their impact at the time. Ed Sikov’s account has captured this fascinating period both in terms of its sensuous surface and its provocative subtexts. He has succeeded in bringing a scintillating period in our cultural history back to glittering life.” – From The Foreword by Molly Haskell.

Katharine Hepburn chases her pet leopard – and Cary Grant – through the jungles of Connecticut; Carole Lombard turns hobo William Powell into Godfrey, her butler – and husband; con-lady Barbara Stanwyck tortures millionaire Henry Fonda into hating her – and then marrying her. Screwball comedies tell one mad, illogical truth: mutual hatred is no reason to give up on love.

Irreverent, elegant, sublime, and ridiculous, the screwball films of the 1930s and 1940s are a timeless collision of high wit and low slapstick, in which the players used street-smart repartee to turn good taste into bad manners. For one breath-taking moment Hollywood produced a succession of these  unforgettable classics: His Girl Friday, Bringing Up Baby, My Man Godfrey, The Lady Eve, The Thin Man, and Twentieth Century. They featured wacky heiresses, boss ladies, and Cinderellas played by stars like Claudette Colbert, Rosalind Russell, and Jean Arthur. They hated and mated Gary Cooper, John Barrymore, and William Powell: absentminded professors, mad impresarios, and tuxedo-clad detectives.

In Screwball, the first lavishly illustrated tribute to the genre, writer and critic Ed Sikov examines all the major, and many of the minor, comedies in search of what makes screwball screwball. With humor, originality, and a keen eye for the twin themes of love and money, Sikov illuminates the inimitable screwball style. With more than 240 pictures printed in striking duotone, Screwball brings back the dialogue, the sets, the lighting, and that very special rendering of the battle of the sexes called love. It is a book as enchanting, exhilarating, and provocative as the movies it celebrates.

ED SIKOV received his Ph.D. in film studies from Columbia University. He has written for numerous publications, including Premiere, Connaisseur, and the Village Voice.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 26 x 25,5 cm (10,2 x 10 inch) – Weight 1.345 g (47,4 oz) – PUBLISHER Crown Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 1989 – ISBN 0-517-57302-4

Sean Connery: His Life and Films (Michael Feeney Callan; introduction by John Boorman)

callan-michael-feeney-sean-connery-his-life-and-filmsAmong European actors Sean Connery is unparalleled in his achievements. Having extended his career from theatrical successes through every genre of film, as James Bond he became the backbone of the most lucrative movie franchise in history.

Born in an Edinburgh tenement, Sean Connery later served time as a milkman, cabinet polisher and art model. He turned to acting on a whim, and early onstage success in South Pacific translated into a TV and movie career. Taking his talents such as The Name of the Rose, The Hunt for Red October and The Rock.

His role as Jimmy Malone in Brian De Palma’s The Untouchables won him an Academy Award, which many saw as recognition of a body of superlative screen creations over twenty years.

Softcover – 295 pp., index – Dimensions 21,5 x 13,5 cm (8,5 x 5,3 inch) – Weight 413 g (14,6 oz) – PUBLISHER W.H. Allen & Co., Ltd., London, 1983 – ISBN 0-86379-007-0

Searching for John Ford: A Life (Joseph McBride)

McBride, Joseph - Searching for John FordHollywood has given us no greater director than John Ford. Between 1917 and 1970, Ford directed and / or produced some 226 pictures, from short silent films to ambitious historical epics and searingly vivid combat documentaries. His major works – such as Stagecoach, The Grapes of Wrath, How Green Was My Valley, They Were Expendable, The Quiet Man, The Searchers, and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance – are cinematic classics. Ford’s films about American history are profound explorations of the national character and the crucibles in which that character was forged. Throughout his long and prolific career, Ford became best known for redefining the Western genre, setting his dramas about pioneer life against the timeless backdrop of Monument Valley.

Ford’s films earned him worldwide admiration. As a man, however he was tormented and deliberately enigmatic. He concealed his true personality from the public, presenting himself as an illiterate hack rather than as the sensitive artist his films show him to be. He shrewdly guided the careers of some of Hollywood’s greatest stars, including John Wayne, Henry Fonda, James Stewart, Maureen O’Hara, and Katharine Hepburn, but he could be abusive, even sadistic, in his treatment of actors. He began his life steeped in the lore of Irish independence and progressive politics; by the end a hawkish Republican and rear admiral in the U.S. Navy, he was lionized by Richard Nixon for creating films that extol the “old virtues” of heroism, duty, and patriotism. Little wonder that those who have written about Ford have either strained to reconcile the daunting paradoxes of his work and personality or avoided them entirely. They have printed the legend and ignored the facts – or printed the facts and obscured the legend.

In its depth, originality, and insight, Searching for John Ford surpasses all previous biographies of the filmmaker. Encompassing and illuminating Ford’s complexities and contradictions, Joseph McBride comes as close as anyone ever will to solving what Andrew Sarris called the “John Ford movie mystery.” McBride traces the whole trajectory of Ford’s life, from his beginning as “Bull” Feeney, the near-sighted, football-playing son of Irish immigrants in Portland, Maine, through to his establishment as America’s most formidable and protean filmmaker. The author of critically acclaimed biographies of Frank Capra and Steven Spielberg, McBride interviewed Ford in 1970 and co-wrote the seminal study John Ford with Michael Wilmington. For more than thirty years, McBride has been exploring the interconnections between Ford’s inner life and his work. He interviewed more than 120 of the director’s friends, relatives, collaborators, and colleagues. Blending lively and penetrating analyses of Ford’s films with an impeccably documented narrative of the historical and psychological contexts in which those films were created, McBride has at long last given John Ford the biography his stature demands. Searching for John Ford will stand as the definitive portrait of an American genius.

JIM McBRIDE is a film historian and critic whose fourteen books include Orson Welles, Hawks on Hawks, Steven Spielberg: A Biography and Frank Capra: The Catastrophe of Success. A former reporter and reviewer for Daily Variety in Hollywood, he is an adjunct professor of film and literature in the Irish studies program at New College of California in San Francisco.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 838 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 15,5 cm (9,5 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 1.310 g (46,2 oz) – PUBLISHER St. Martin’s Press, New York, New York, 2001 – ISBN 0-312-24232-8

Second Act: An Autobiography (Joan Collins)

Collins, Joan - Second ActJoan Collins is a legendary beauty whose glittering stage and film careers have made her name synonymous with fame. Out of the spotlight, the drama and excitement of Joan Collins’s personal life rival the plot of the most compelling Hollywood blockbuster. In Second Act, she tells her own story with striking candor and wonderful anecdotes full of insight and humor.

With her family’s roots in entertainment, Joan Collins seemed destined for stardom, but it took more than looks and talent to rise to the top. Drawing on the courage and willingness to work hard that are the hallmarks of her success, she left the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London to try her hand at film and then gambled on Hollywood, where her rise was spectacular. She has starred in countless roles in film, television and theater, from The Virgin Queen – where she was not one of Bette Davis’s favorite ladies-in-waiting – to The Girl in a Red Velvet Swing, The Last of Mrs. Cheney, Private Lives, and of course, Dynasty, where she played the shrewdly calculating Alexis Carrington. She has been a television film producer, and as a best-selling novelist she won a landmark legal victory over her publisher, Random House. Married four times, she talks about her husbands, her high-profile love affairs, and her relationship with her sister, world-renowned novelist Jackie Collins. Joan Collins has worked and played with the most celebrated producers, directors, and actors, and she discusses how her personal and professional lives have been crucially intertwined. Having just returned from London to once again live in Hollywood, Joan Collins has written a captivating, hilarious, and very revealing insider’s life story.

JOAN COLLINS is the ultimate celebrity, and in this extraordinarily well-written memoir, she recounts the places and the people she has known and worked with – a vast cast from Marlon Brando to Kenneth Branagh, from Marilyn Monroe to Madonna.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 352 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 800 g (28,2 oz) – PUBLISHER St. Martin’s Press, New York, New York, 1996 – ISBN 0-312-16997-3

The Second Book of Movie Lists (Jeff Ronan)

rovin-jeff-the-second-signet-book-of-movie-lists“Welcome to the all-new, all-original Second Signet Book of Movie Lists. ‘Truth needs no flowers of speech,’ wrote Pope, and this book is just that: one hundred unadorned, often unflattering collections of truisms about the movie industry. Well-known celebrities were consulted for their favorite films; mountains of data were accumulated. The result is, we think, a more detailed, more eclectic volume than the first book. And, we believe, a lot more fun.” – The Introduction.

A double feature’s worth of fun and fascination: fill your personal treasure-house of star-studded trivia and golden movieland memories with such rare gems and delightful nuggets as famous actors and actresses who stripped away their inhibitions to show their all to the camera; athletes who played themselves in films; the most hideous deaths and the most incredible monsters Hollywood ever created; Cary Grant’s birthday and others too; the actor who turned down the lead in Raiders of the Lost Ark; hugely acclaimed movies that were box-office flops – and panned flicks that became smashes.

Softcover – 149 pp. – Dimensions 18 x 11 cm (7,1 x 4,3 inch) – Weight 112 g (4 oz) – PUBLISHER New American Library, New York, New York, 1982 – ISBN 0-451-11516-3

Het Seksleven van de Hollywooddiva’s: Dromen en Schandalen (Nigel Cawthorme)

cawthorne-nigel-het-sexleven-van-de-hollywooddiva-sSeks was vanaf het prille begin het gangbare betaalmiddel in Hollywood, op het witte doek en daarbuiten. De eerste filmmagnaten stopten elk bijbels epos vol naakte meisjes, terwijl de mythische auditiebank de plek werd waar toekomstige filmsterren hun sterrenstatus veiligstelden. De filmindustrie met haar diva’s gebruikte seks om geld te verdienen, maar kon zich nauwelijks meten met de onthullingen uit het echte leven van de geëerde actrices van Hollywood.

NIGEL CAWTHORNE openbaart hun geheimen, te beginnen bij de eerste schandalen die de ondergang werden van stommefilmsterren als Clara Bow en Louise Brooks – de wilde feesten, geheimzinnige minnaars, obscure verledens en tragische eindes – in deze openhartige beschrijving van de godinnen van Hollywood: Greta Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, Ava Gardner, Lana Turner, Grace Kelly, Marilyn Monroe, Joan Crawford, Jean Harlow en vele anderen.

Softcover – 288 pp., index – Dimensions 19,5 x 13 cm (7,7 x 5,1 inch) – Weight 312 g (11 oz) – PUBLISHER Librero, Hedel, The Netherlands, 2000 – ISBN 90-5764-066-X

Self-Portrait (Gene Tierney, with Mickey Herskowitz)

Tierney, Gene - Self-Portrait (hc)‘I had no trouble playing any kind of a role,’ Gene Tierney writes. ‘My problems began when I had to be myself.’

In Hollywood’s golden age, everyone knew the starring roles Miss Tierney played in her 36 films: the unwashed Ellie May in Tobacco Road, the demure Martha in Heaven Can Wait; her appearances opposite Clark Gable, Tyrone Power, Rex Harrison, Humphrey Bogart, Henry Fonda, and, best remembered of all, as the haunting – murdered? – beauty of the portrait painting in Laura, one of the most televised films ever.

Her rollercoaster marriage to fashion designer Oleg Cassini and her globe-trotting affair with Prince Aly Khan were public property. Word of her dates with billionaire Howard huges and a lighthearted ex-naval officer named Jack Kennedy circulated over the years. But the inside story of her greatest, most heart-wrenching role – herself – has never been told until right now.

Outwardly living every woman’s fantasies, she became an emotional invalid. Her marriage collapsed. Her romances failed. Her father became a cruel disappointment. Her first daughter was born deaf, blind, hopelessly retarded, At the crest of her career, Gene Tierny attempted suicide, suffered a nervous breakdown, and spent the next seven years in and out of sanatoriums. With candor, humor, and sometimes with anger, but never with self-pity or self-indulgence, she tells of her meteoric career, her long, slow, uneven recovery from “the black tunnel of mental illness”; the struggles with her doctors, her treatments, her escape from confinement, her depressions, her mad impulses, herself, always herself… and finally on to a happy remarriage and tranquillity.

They give no Oscar for such a role. They sould.

GENE TIERNEY, now 58, lives in retirement in Houston with her husband, Howard Lee, an oil executive. MICKEY HERSKOWITZ, her collaborator, co-authored the best-sellers The Camera Never Blinks by Dan Rather and Cosell by Howard Cosell.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 264 pp. – Dimensions 21,5 x 14 cm (8,5 x 5,5 inch) – Weight 496 g (17,5 oz) – PUBLISHER Wyden Books, New York, New York, 1979 – ISBN 0-88326-152-9

Self-Portrait (Gene Tierney, with Mickey Herskowitz)

tierney-gene-self-portrait“The role most often identified with my career was that of the title character in Laura. The part was unusual in that Laura dominated the story as a presence, felt but unseen, for half the movie. She was the victim of events she had not created and could not control. Laura was a woman of mystery and glamor, unattainable, the kind of woman I admired in the pages of Vogue as a young girl.

I have never been easy with explaining things – why this works or that does not. Rehearsals and screening rooms are often unreliable because they can’t provide the chemistry, the currents between an audience and what appears on the stage or screen. A great work may stand on its own. But if the chemistry is there, an ordinary story becomes something better. To analyze it further is like trying to explain air.

Laura had the chemistry. I am not being modest when I say that people remember me less for my acting job than as the girl in the portrait, which was the movie’s key prop. Then there was the haunting title song by Johnny Mercer, and a tricky plot: Laura, believed to be the victim of a murder, reappears to become a suspect.

Whatever the reasons, through the years the movie became a cult favorite. No salute to Fox is complete without a film clip from it – usually the scene where the detective, Dana Andrews, dozes in a chair and suddenly the girl in the picture appears before him, Laura come to life. I have had people tell me that they set their clocks to get up after midnight in order to catch Laura on the late, late show.

I liked the script, but after one reading was unenthused about my role. The time on camera was less than one would like. And who wants to play a painting? The treatment of the story seemed unorthodox. The first half was narrated by the Clifton Webb character, the writer Waldo Lydecker, who is secretly in love with Laura but finally tries to do her in. The second half was told from the viewpoint of the young detective, who falls in love with her portrait. Would the device work?” – From chapter 13, ‘Laura.’

Softcover – 244 pp. – Dimensions 17,5 x 10,5 cm (6,9 x 4,1 inch) – Weight 143 g (5 oz) – PUBLISHER Berkley Books, New York, New York, 1979 – ISBN 0-425-04485-8

Selznick: The Man Who Produced Gone With the Wind (Bob Thomas; foreword by Peter Bart)

thomas-bob-selznick-the-man-who-produced-gone-with-the-wind“Hollywood’s old-time moguls were a fearsome lot, but few if any had the polish or the ‘cool’ to survive at today’s bottom-line oriented studios. David O. Selznick would have been the exception, as Bob Thomas’ deft 1970 biography now reminds us. Ruthless but well-spoken, Selznick understood the rules of the game and adapted brilliantly to them. Remembered today as the man who went from producing rather staid film adaptations of David Copperfield and Anna Karenina to risking the store on Gone With The Wind, Selznick was a smooth operator, but hardly the erudite filmmaker who dedicated himself to the art of the cinema. He was a gambler and bully who lived beyond his means and habitually popped Benzedrine and random barbiturates. He married the boss’s daughter – Irene’s father Louis B. Mayer, was the monarch of MGM – and, in recruiting John Hay Whitney as his partner, revealed a talent at exploiting the fascination of Old Money with New Hollywood. The plethora of memos that flowed from Selznick’s office reminded filmmakers and artisans alike of his insistence on quality, but also underscored the fact that he often simply missed the point. In producing a dreadful movie called The Garden of Allah, Selznick rhapsodized, ‘This script is poetry. I want to hear every syllable on the sound track, every consonant, every vowel.’ The film would have been better off if the audience hadn’t distinguished a single line of dialogue.

If Selznick had his rough edges, he also was a sophisticated businessman. He knew he could get away with considerable liberties when it came to adapting Charles Dickens, but since virtually everyone in America had read Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With The Wind, he understood he had to hew close to the text, irrespective of cost. The risks were considerable. Selznick had only recently joined Whitney in founding Selznick International Pictures and debts were mounting up. He had left a safe perch, working for his father-in-law at MGM, but wanted more autonomy. He also bridled at comparisons with Irving G. Thalberg, the town’s golden boy, who cast a big shadow over that studio.

In fact, Selznick had to be prodded into making Gone With The Wind, rather than plucking it out of the air, as the myth-makers later suggested. His New York story editor, Kay Brown, hammered away at him to read the newly-published best-seller. Finally succumbing, he read only a 25-page synopsis, but it was not until John Hay Whitney, of all people, announced that he would personally write the check and buy the damned book for $ 50,000, that Selznick closed the deal. When he finally repaired to Hawaii to read the long tome, he realized that he had bought both a best-seller and a hot potato. ‘If this picture fails, I’ll lose everything,’ he fumed. ‘That’s just what L. B. (Mayer) wants. He’d like me to fall on my ass so I’d have to crawl back to him at Metro.’

Much has been made of Selznick’s search for Scarlett O’Hara – a brilliant publicity stunt – but Bob Thomas also relates the details of Selznick’s search for a script. After his first writer, Sidney Howard, turned in a five-hour screenplay, Selznick went through virtually every top writer in town in an effort to compress it to viable length. He even anointed F. Scott Fitzgerald, who complained bitterly that he’d been instructed simply to re-arrange words written by Margaret Mitchell, and not to add his own.

The producer agonized even further over the choice of Clark Gable to play Rhett Butler. Gable was under contract to the dreaded Louis B. Mayer, so the stubborn Selznick ricocheted between Gary Cooper (he was under contract to the also dreaded Samuel Goldwyn) and Errol Flynn (who was under contract to the equally feared Jack L. Warner) before capitulating to a killer deal with Mayer. In the end, of course, Gable played opposite an English girl, Vivian Leigh, thus inflaming many of the novel’s Southern readers.

Gone With The Wind went famously over its absurd $ 2.5 million budget, which sent Selznick traveling for additional money from A.P. Giannini of the Bank of America as well as the Whitney family. In the process, he drove his director Victor Fleming crazy, ultimately finishing the movie with Sam Wood, along with filmmakers like Sidney Franklin and William A. Wellman, who directed selected scenes. At the end of these agonies, Selznick collected more Academy Awards than any other film in Oscar history. Yet, Oscar in hand, he still paused to blast his publicist because Gable didn’t get the best actor award.

Gone With The Wind haunted Selznick for the rest of his life. Since he was only 37 at the time he made the film, his later years were spent trying to top himself. The obsession caused almost everyone who worked for him to have nervous breakdowns. The famous screenwriter Nunnally Johnson turned down a writing contract with him because ‘my understanding is that an assignment from you consists of three months of work and three of recuperation.’

He made some other noteworthy movies, such as The Song of Bernadette starring Jennifer Jones, then known as Phylis Isley, with whom he ultimately became involved. By 1949, turkeys like The Paradine Case and Portrait of Jennie all but ruined his once-successful company. His friends deserted him in droves.

The press regularly ridiculed Selznick for announcing so many projects that never got made. By the time he finally got A Farewell to Arms off the ground, Selznick’s myriad memos were the subjects of jokes throughout the industry. The failure of the film left him broke and tired. His final grand scheme was to launch a Broadway musical of Gone With The Wind, but he failed to get the financing. Selznick’s death at 63 occasioned abundant tributes, but Thomas reminds us that the producer once delivered his own best epitaph when, in 1959, the set for ‘Tara’ was dismantled. Selznick watched the scene sadly and commented, ‘Once photographed, life here is ended. It is symbolic of Hollywood.’ That remark in itself was enough to inspire a final memo, but it didn’t.” – The Foreword by Peter Bart.

Softcover – 356 pp. – Dimensions 19,5 x 13 cm (7,7 x 5,1 inch) – Weight 460 g (16,2 oz) – PUBLISHER New Millennium Press, Beverly Hills, 2001 [reprint of the 1970 edition] – ISBN 1893224-24-4

Send Yourself Roses: Thoughts On My Life, Love, and Leading Roles (Kathleen Turner, with Gloria Feldt)

turner-kathleen-send-yourself-rosesFrom her film debut as the sultry schemer in Body Heat to her award-winning role as Martha in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, actress Kathleen Turner’s unique blend of beauty, intelligence, and raw sexuality has driven her personal and professional life. Now, in this gutsy memoir, the screen icon tells us of the risks she’s taken and the lessons she’s learned – sometimes the hard way.

For the first time, Turner shares her childhood challenges – a life lived in countries around the world until her father, a State Department official whom she so admired, died suddenly when she was a teenager. She talks about her twenty-year marriage and why she and her husband recently separated, her close relationship with her daughter, her commitment to service, and how activism in controversial causes has bolstered her beliefs. And Turner reveals the pain and heartbreak of her struggle with rheumatoid arthritis, and how, in spite of it, she made a daring decision: to take a break from the movies and relaunch her stage career.

With characteristic irreverent humor, Turner shares her behind-the-screen stories of dealing with all types of creative, intimidating, and inspiring characters. Along the way, she describes what it’s like to work with legends such as Jack Nicholson, Michael Douglas, William Hurt, Steve Martin, Francis Ford Coppola, John Huston, John Waters, and Edward Albee.

Kathleen Turner has always known that she would play the lead in the story of her life. It’s impossible not to take her lessons on living, love, and leading roles to heart. And it won’t be long until you’ll be sending yourself roses.

KATHLEEN TURNER is an award-winning actress who has starred in over twenty-five films, including Prizzi’s Honor, Romancing the Stone, and The War of the Roses, along with twelve Broadway shows including The Graduate and Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? She is active in Planned Parenthood, People for the American Way, and City Meals on Wheels. She lives in New York City. GLORIA FELDT is the author of The War on Choice and Behind Every Choice Is a Story, a communicator for the Huffington Post and Women’s eNews, and the former president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America. She’s been named Glamour’s Woman of the Year and one of Vanity Fair’s Top 200 Women Legens, Leaders, and Trailblazers. She lives in New York City and Arizona.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 261 pp. – Dimensions 23,5 x 15,5 cm (9,3 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 489 g (17,2 oz) – PUBLISHER Springboard Press, New York, New York, 2008 – ISBN 978-0-446-58112-7

September Song: An Intimate Biography of Walter Huston (John Weld)

Weld, John - September SongTwo of the greatest performances in all of motion pictures were given by the same man. In The Devil and Daniel Webster he was the elfin Mr. Scratch, stroking his chin whiskers, confidently puffing a cigar as he claimed the soul of his victim. And in The Treasure of the Sierra Madre he was the grizzled old prospector Howard, dancing a frenzied jig for his bewildered companions as he pointed to the gold that lay beneath their feet.

He also played Abraham Lincoln, Othello, Doc Holliday, and the singing and dancing patriarch of the Cohen family. He spoke words of Shakespeare and Eugene O’Neill with equal grace. He played bankers, lawyers, business tycoons, newspaper men, prison wardens, ambassadors, outlaws, and presidents. His name was Walter Huston.

This book is the first full-length account of Walter Huston’s extraordinary life. Work on it began in 1937, when the actor consented to a series of lengthy interviews with his friend John Weld. Publishers were not interested at the time, and for more than forty years after Huston’s death, the manuscript remained unfinished.

Today, Walter Huston is known primarily as the father of the late writer-director John Huston and the grandfather of actress Angelica Huston. But that’s all about to change. John Weld, at the age of ninety-three, has completed the job he began sixty years ago. And once again Walter Huston will be recognized as one of the greatest actors of his generation.

JOHN WELD met Walter Huston at the age of twenty-six, when he was a budding novelist and screenwriter in Hollywood. Previously he had been a stuntman and also a reporter for both the New York World and the Paris edition of the New York Herald-Tribune. He is the author of ten novels, including Don’t You Cry for Me, the acclaimed story of the doomed Donner Party; The Pardners, a novel of the California gold rush; and Sabbath Has No End, a novel of slavery in the early 1800s. His nonfiction books include Young Man in Paris; Fly Away Home; and Laguna, I Love You, a collection of columns he wrote during the time he and his wife were publishers of the Laguna Beach Post. Weld and his wife of sixty years, the former actress Gigi Parrish, live in Granada Hills, California.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 231 pp., index – Dimensions 22 x 14,5 cm (8,7 x 5,7 inch) – Weight 467 g (16,5 oz) – PUBLISHER The Scarecrow Press, Inc., Lanham, Maryland, 1998 – ISBN 0-8108-3408-1

Serves Me Right (Sarah Miles)

miles-sarah-serves-me-rightIn the first volume of her acclaimed autobiography, A Right Royal Bastard, Sarah Miles described a childhood marked by dyslexia and the need to rebel against every institution in sight. While she was at one of them – RADA – she made a list of dreams and to her amazement found them coming true. Not only did she become a film star first time round with Term of Trial, but she was acting opposite the very man she’d adored since her childhood memories of Wuthering Heights , Laurence Olivier, and during filming in Paris, Sarah finally became Heathcliff’s Cathy.

Keeping their affair secret for his sake created a stressful double life which took its toll. During the making of The Servant her relationship with her first love, James Fox, began to fall apart. As Sarah became more of a recluse, waiting for Olivier’s phone calls, her agent lost patience until one night he bundled her into a taxi and took her to a party where she met her Knight in Shining Armour, Robert Bolt.

Taking the marriage vows with Robert was the turning point in Sarah’s life. She not only gained respectability at last, but managed to tick off several more dreams – a country house, a son, a stud farm. Then, while in Los Angeles for her Oscar nomination for Ryan’s Daughter, she met David Whiting, a Time magazine journalist. Sarah was not to know at the time that David was dangerously unbalanced and that he harboured a deep obsession for her – an  obsession that would end in tragedy, but begin her new life.

SARAH MILES married the writer Robert Bolt (twice). They have a son, Tom, and live in the country.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 473 pp. – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 841 g (29,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Macmillan, London, 1994 – ISBN 0-333-60141-6

Seventy Light Years: Freddie Young, A Life in the Movies (Freddie Young, as told to Peter Busby)

Young, Freddie - Seventy Light YearsIn this, his autobiography, Freddie Young takes us on a journey through the history of cinema, from his early days processing celluloid by hand in the studios of Shepherd’s Bush, to his adventures with David Lean in far-flung locations all over the world. His collaboration with Lean earned Freddie Young three Oscars: for Lawrence of Arabia, Doctor Zhivago and Ryan’s Daughter. His story is rich in fond and funny anecdotage about the directors and the stars with whom he worked – both in Britain and in Hollywood from Spencer Tracy and Ingrid Bergman to George Cukor and John Ford. It also provides an invaluable guide to how cinematography evolved from a craft into an art, and establishes Freddie Young as one of the major innovators in the history of image-making.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 164 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 366 g (12,9 oz) – PUBLISHER Faber and Faber, London, 1999 – ISBN 0-571-19793-0

The Sewing Circle: Hollywood’s Greatest Secret, Female Stars Who Loved Other Women (Alex Madsen)

Madsen, Alex - The Sewing CircleThe focus is Hollywood’s pinnacle decades, the thirty years stretching from the dawn of the “talkies” in the late 1920s to the collapse of the studio system and the anticommunist witch hunt that was so harrowing to nonconformists.

This is a book about appearances, about denied attachments and emotions and the mocking of mystery and allure. It is the documented story and affectionate close-up of exalted lives and furtive appetites. When Greta Garbo and Marlene Dietrich had enough of men, artifice, and glamour, they sought solace, strength, and understanding in clandestine, feminine friendships.

On-screen, they were incarnations of turbid fantasies. Off-screen, they depended on women who loved women, like the poet-playwright Mercedes de Acosta, whose bed they shared in succession. Catholicism and Judaism – the predominant faiths of showbiz people – are explicitly antagonistic toward same-sex love. The mores of the Golden Era enforced a two-way secrecy. Not only did lesbians live hidden lives, the public at large averted its eyes. Nobody wanted to know.

Softcover – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 23 x 15 cm (9 x 6 inch) – Weight 407 g (14,4 oz) – PUBLISHER A Birch Lane Press Book, New York, New York, 1995 – ISBN 1-55972-275-4

Sex Lives of the Hollywood Goddesses (Nigel Cawthorne)

cawthorne-nigel-sex-lives-of-hollywood-goddessesFrom the very beginning sex has been the common currency in Hollywood, both on and off the screen. Early movie moguls packed their biblical epics with naked girls, while in private the mythic casting couch became the place where Hollywood’s future greats would guarantee their star status. The silver screen, with its femme fatales, used sex to sell, but it could barely compete with the real revelations of Hollywood’s most esteemed actresses.

From the early sex scandals that brought down silent screen sirens such as Clara Bow and Louise Brooks, NIGEL CAWTHORNE reveals all the secrets – the wild parties, secret lovers, sordid pasts and tragic endings – in this most intimate guide to Hollywood’s women as they really were: Greta Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, Ava Gardner, Lana Turner, Grace Kelly, Marilyn Monroe, Joan Crawford, Jean Harlow and many more.

Softcover – 278 pp., index – Dimensions 19,5 x 13 cm (7,7 x 5,1 inch) – Weight 288 g (10,2 oz) – PUBLISHER Prion, London, 1997 – ISBN 1-85375-250-9

Sex Lives of the Hollywood Idols (Nigel Cawthorne)

cawthorne-nigel-sex-lives-of-hollywood-idolsHollywood’s men have made generations of women swoon both on and off the screen. As celluloid idols they were frequently perfect gentlemen, yet in the flesh they were all too often anything but. It was difficult as objects of so much desire to resist the temptations thrown at their feet. Many, lost in the fantasy world of their own stardom, looked to sex as a hedonistic escape, while others used their status as a path to their own particular and sometimes bizarre forms of sexual fulfilment.

Careerist philandering, Hollywood’s sex addicts, gay affairs, teenage lovers and the sex scandals that rocked some of Hollywood’s greatest players, NIGEL CAWTHORNE reveals all in this ultimate guide to Hollywood’s men as they really were: Charlie Chaplin, Rudolph Valentino, Errol Flynn, Cary Grant, Rock Hudson, James Dean and many more.

Softcover – 278 pp., index – Dimensions 19,5 x 13 cm (7,7 x 5,1 inch) – Weight 275 g (9,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Prion, London, 1997 – ISBN 1-85375-249-5

Shared Pleasures: A History of Movie Presentation in the United States (Douglas Gomery; foreword by David Bordwell)

Gomery, Douglas - Shared Pleasures“No existing book covers the fascinating terrain this work surveys. Ambitiously conceived and prodigiously researched, Shared Pleasures should change the way motion picture exhibition in the U.S. is conceived by film scholars and industry analysts alike.” – Charles Wolfe, University of California, Santa Barbara

“By studying film exhibition, Gomery shows how the Hollywood film industry adapted its business policies to diversity and change within American society…. Despite the book’s concern for broad trends, it keeps firmly before us the concrete experience of moviegoing. Gomery initiates us into the training of ushers in picture palaces, the tactics of games and giveaways during the Depression, and the business logic of 1950s kiddie matinees. We even learn the history of popcorn.”David Bordwell, from the foreword.

Shared Pleasures presents the first comprehensive history of how Americans have watched their favorite movies. Douglas Gomery tells the complete story of the film exhibition business, from the humble nickelodeon to movie palaces to today’s mass markets of cable TV and home video rentals. Along the way Gomery shows us how the American economy and society altered going to the movies.

Shared Pleasures answers such questions as: How and where have Americans gone to the movies? What factors prompted the growth of specialized theaters? To what extent have corporations controlled the means of moviegoing? How has television changed the watching of motion pictures? Gomery analyzes social, technological, and economic transformations inside and outside the movie industry – sound, color (and later, colorization), television movies, cable movie networks, and home video, as well as automobiles, air conditioning, and mass transit. He traces the effects of immigration, growing urban and suburban cultures, two world wars, racial and ethnic segregation, and the baby boom on the movie theater industry, noting such developments as newsreel theaters and art cinemas.

Gomery demonstrates how the movie theater business has remained a profitable industry, transforming movie houses from storefronts to ornate movie palaces to the sticky-floored mall multiplexes of today. Contrary to some gloomy predictions, Gomery contends that movie watching is not declining as a form of entertainment. With the growth of cable TV, home movie rental, and other technical changes, more Americans are watching (and enjoying) more movies than ever before.

DOUGLAS GOMERY is professor in the Department of Radio-Television-Film at the University of Maryland and senior researcher at the Media Studies Project of the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars in Washington, D.C. He is the editor of High Sierra: Screenplay and Analysis, also published by the University of Wisconsin Press. His other books include The Hollywood Studio System, Movie History: A Survey, and four other books examining the economics and history of American media.

Softcover – 381 pp., index – Dimensions 23 x 15 cm (9,1 x 5,9 inch) – Weight 570 g (20,1 oz) – PUBLISHER British Film Institute, London, 1992 – ISBN 0-85170-314-3

Shattered Love: A Memoir (Richard Chamberlain)

Chamberlain, Richard - Shattered Love A MemoirFrom his breakout role in Dr. Kildare through more than four decades of unforgettable performances on television and in film, Richard Chamberlain has epitomized the ideal leading man. Strong and handsome, sophisticated yet kindly, his public persona has drawn fans of all ages. But despite his worldwide acclaim in The Thorn Birds and Shogun – two of the most successful miniseries of all time – the actor himself has never led a life of easy confidence. Even at the height of his fame he lived in constant fear that the “real” Richard would one day be discovered – and that the love he had gained from fans, family and friends would be ripped away.

In Shattered Love, Richard Chamberlain recounts his fascinating journey as an impressionable boy growing up in postwar California who stumbled into the Hollywood of big studios, big money, and big personas. Through long days on the set and glittering evenings on the town with Joan Crawford, Princess Margaret, Elizabeth Taylor, and a cast of other colorful characters, Chamberlain gamely and tirelessly played his Golden Boy role. As time passed, however, he longed to reconcile his deepest self with his public persona – including his sexual orientation, a secret he has guarded until now. With candor, honesty and wit, Shattered Loves captures Chamberlain’s poignant struggle to come to terms with the truths in his life – from his tumultuous relationship with his troubled father to his lifelong quest to find spiritual truth in everyday life.

Warm, touching, and brave, Shattered Move draws on a lifetime of stories and on lessons learned from some of the most inspiring spiritual teachers of our time – sharing with readers the author’s own journey from desperate suppression to a life lived with an open heart.

RICHARD CHAMBERLAIN has starred in such classics as Dr. Kildare, The Thorn Birds, and Shogun and has received rave reviews for his theatrical turns in Hamlet, Cyrano de Bergerac, and My Fair Lady, as well as numerous other plays and films. Chamberlain lives in Hawaii, where he continues to act and pursue his passion for painting.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 246 pp. – Dimensions 23,5 x 15,5 cm (9,3 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 540 g (19 oz) – PUBLISHER HarperCollins Publishers, Inc., New York, New York, 2003 – ISBN 0-06-008743-9

Shelley Also Known as Shirley (Shelley Winters)

Autographed copy For Bob, Enjoy, till Vol III. You look like you’re naughty. Love, Shelley Winters 4/21/93

winters-shelley-shelley-hcThe electrifying and outspoken memoirs of an earthy and unusually intelligent actress. In a book as gutsy and spunky as the lady herself, Shelley Winters tells of the street-smart kid from Brooklyn who crashed Hollywood as a harem-girl sexpot. The Blonde Bombshell fought to make it as a serious actress and walked off with two Oscars. With exciting romances along the way – Lawrence Tierney, John Ireland, Errol Flynn, Burt Lancaster, Marlon Brando, William Holden – ending with her explosive and violent marriage to Italian actor Vittorio Gassman (when he complained about her futile attempts at spaghetti al dente, she dumped the scalding mess over his head), she tells of her struggle for a successful career and a happy homelife.

Shelley sizzles, erupts, and crackles with rich humor; it reads like a novel, with continuing characters like her roommate Marilyn Monroe, her Actors Studio buddy James Dean, her friend and sometimes romantic interest Farley Granger, mentors Max Reinhardt, Lee Strasberg, and Charles Laughton, and her loyal sister Blanche. With an overall warm Jewish family feeling learned from her Zayda and Bubba, she describes bosses like Harry Cohn and Howard Hughes (she liked them both, though Harry fired her as a failed sex object), respected co-workers like Ronald Colman, Montgomery Clift, and Robert Mitchum, and directors she’s worshipped like George Cukor, George Stevens, and Paul Mazursky. This is a courageous and honest book in which one of America’s favorite personalities levels with the reader about the content and the meaning of her life.

SHELLEY WINTERS is best known for her Broadway triumph in A Hatful of Rain and for her films A Double Life (’47), The Great Gatsby (’49), A Place in the Sun (’51), The Night of the Hunter (’55), The Champan Report (’62), Lolita (’62), Alfie (’66), and The Poseidon Adventure (’72), and for her Oscar-winning performances in The Diary of Anne Frank (’59) and A Patch of Blue (’65). In addition, she is a playwright, and she teaches at the Strasberg Institute and at the Circle in the Square Theater, and moderates at the Actors Studio on both the East and West Coasts. She has homes in New York and Beverly Hills.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 511 pp. – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 901 g (31,8 oz) – PUBLISHER William Morrow & Company, Inc., New York, New York, 1980 – ISBN 0-688-03638-4

Shelley Also Known as Shirley (Shelley Winters)

winters-shelley-shelley“George Stevens had a very unusual way of working. He would discuss the scene, but not the lines, and would photograph the second or third rehearsal so the scene had an almost improvisatory quality. Monty [Montgomery Clift] was such a joy to work with that I felt as if I already knew him very well. Stevens would print the first take, then spend the next three hours minutely rehearsing the scene, then film it again. He explained to me that in his way he often got actors’ unplanned reactions that were spontaneous and human and often exactly right. And often when actors overintellectualize or plan their reactions, they aren’t as good. Then, later on, he would rehearse for hours to get exactly what he needed for the scene. But his direction was so kind and quiet that you knew that you were in the hands of a master and that you always inadvertently did exactly what he wanted you to do. I came away the test knowing that this man had photographed my soul and that if I got the part, it would be the greatest picture I would ever be in. Time has proved me right so far.

While I waited for George Stevens’s decision, because no one but George cast his movies, I had to put the whole thing out of my mind because I couldn’t bear not getting it. During the week I waited, I saw only Farley and my sister, and we would take long rides up the coast to Santa Barbara. And when I worked in Charles Laughton’s class at night, I could hardly speak, much less recite the beautiful lines of Shakespeare. Laughton knew I had done the test, and one evening after I had stuttered through ‘If mmmusic be the fffood of love, ppplay on…’ he took me for a drink across the street our little theater and said, ‘I know you’re going through a very anxious time, but you must believe in yourself. If you’re going to have a long career, and I think you will, you will have up periods and down periods, periods of wonderful roles and periods of no roles or bad ones. An actor, just like a pianist, must use his instrument, and you must believe in the inevitability of your growth and recognition.’ God, how I loved that man!

The very next morning George Stevens called and told me that Paramount was in negotiation with Universal and as far as he was concerned, the role of the factory girl in An American Tragedy was mine.” – From chapter 19 about the casting in A Place in the Sun (1951).

Softcover – 497 pp. – Dimensions 17,5 x 10,5 cm (6,9 x 4,1 inch) – Weight 297 g (10,5 oz) – PUBLISHER Ballantine Books, New York, New York, 1980 – ISBN 0-345-29506-4

Shelley II: The Middle of My Century (Shelley Winters)

Winters, Shelley - Shelley IIShelley II is the most uproariously entertaining show business autobiography since Shelley Winters’ first book, Shelley: Also Known as Shirley. Picking up where she left off, America’s most irrepressible star takes us on a wild ride through the Hollywood of the 1950s and early 1960s, with side trips to Broadway, the Actors Studio, and around the world.

Returning to America from Italy in 1954, Shelley is devastated by the scandalous breakup of her marriage to Vittorio Gassman – but not for long. In the years that follow, we see Shelley triumph as an actress – and follow her through passionate love affairs, a tempestuous marriage, and her growing commitment to the civil rights movement of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and the political careers of Adlai Stevenson and John Kennedy.

Here is Shelley struggling to shed the blonde bombshell image that Universal Studios had created for her. She studies the Method with Lee Strasberg at the Actors Studio. She takes Broadway by storm in A Hatful of Rain. And she ultimately receives the recognition she deserves, winning a pair of Oscars for her roles in The Diary of Anne Frank and A Patch of Blue.

Here is Shelley remembering the antics of her famous friends… Marilyn Monroe, her Hollywood roommate, who is perfect in front of the camera but helpless in the kitchen (charged with making salad, she scrubs each lettuce leaf with a Brillo pad); James Dean, who guns his motorcycle and plays chicken with a terrified Shelley as she drives down Sunset Boulevard; Dylan Thomas, who is introduced to Shelley as a “Welsh cartoonist,” and who scandalizes Hollywood by reeling drunkenly and “watering” the plants at a Charlie Chaplin open house; Laurence Olivier, who floats mash notes to Shelley across the pool at the Four Seasons restaurant in New York; Sean Connery, a young Scottish actor who romances Shelley in his chilly London flat – and later stays with her in New York to avoid hotel bills (not that she minded); Tony Franciosa, her co-star in A Hatful of Rain, whom Shelley swoons for and marries… “If there had been an Olympic sex team that year,” she recalls, “Tony would have been the captain.”

Here is Shelley dining with Nikita Khrushchev… wandering around a Moscow suburb at dawn in a white satin evening gown… changing her clothes in a men’s room in Brighton – and being surprised when Prince Philip walks in… unable to lie naked next to James Mason on the set of Lolita as genius director Stanley Kubrick looks on… and much more.

Revealing, warm, and hilariously funny, here is Shelley having the times of her life – the story of a remarkable actress and an extraordinary woman, told with all of Shelley’s inimitable exuberance and candor.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 494 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 860 g (30,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Simon & Schuster, New York, New York, 1989 ISBN 0-671-44210-4

Shirley & Marty: An Unlikely Story (Shirley Jones, Marty Ingles, with Mickey Herskowitz)

Autographed copy Love Leo, Shirley Jones. Hello, Leo! Marty

Jones, Shirley - Shirley & MartyThe romance of Oscar-winner Shirley Jones and superagent Marty Ingels is the least likely ever recorded – and among the funniest. She’s the American sweetheart whose career has included the movies Oklahoma, Carousel, The Music Man, Elmer Gantry, and the long-running television series The Partridge Family. He’s the star of the sixties comedy I’m Dickens, He’s Penster, the comic from Queens who had a nervous breakdown on The Tonight Show, and the big-bucks success story whose neurosis led him into lifelong security through his marriage. When these two first met, it wasn’t exactly love at first sight. In fact, it was more like “a wrecking ball knocking down a building.” Then, before they knew it, they were in  Hollywood’s zaniest marriage.

Shirley & Marty is an offbeat story of two hardworking Hollywood professionals who didn’t have time for love. They were too busy working, divorcing, and keeping body and soul together. What did they know about happiness? Shirley Jones was ending a painful marriage to Jack Cassidy, who very soon would come to an untimely end. She had work to do and children to raise. Marty Ingels had also ended a marriage and was afraid his career was over.

Now Shirley & Marty looks at the private life of this very public couple and their very important contributions to an unpredictable entertainment industry. From Jones’s fairy-tale-like rise to fame to Ingels’s driven soul, from her role as mother to Shaun, Patrick, and Ryan and stepmother to David Cassidy to Marty’s stabilizing influence on the family, this is a wacky and affectionate look at Hollywood and a crazy glimpse – with all its contradictions – of love.

SHIRLEY JONES and MARTY INGLES live in Beverly Hills, California. MICKEY HERSKOWITZ is a Texas-based author whose books include best-selling autobiographies with Dan Rather and Bette Davis.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 335 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 663 g (23,4 oz) – PUBLISHER William Morrow & Co., Inc., New York, New York, 1990 – ISBN 0-688-08457-5

The Shocking Miss Pilgrim: A Writer in Early Hollywood (Frederica Sagor Maas)

sager-maas-frederica-the-shocking-miss-pilgrim-verkleindIn 1920 a young Columbia journalism student answered an ad for “Assistant to Story Editor at Universal Pictures.” In her new job, Frederica Sagor found herself reviewing the opening night performances of Broadway plays, and she soon became story editor herself. But after four years, the heads of Universal’s New York office reneged on their promise to help her become a screenwriter.

So the ambitious twenty-three-year-old moved to Hollywood and launched her own writing career by drafting a screenplay of the best-selling novel The Plastic Age for the “It” girl Clara Bow. On the basis of that script, she landed a staff position at the giant MGM studio. In the years to come, she worked with and befriended numerous actors and directors, including Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford, and Erich von Stroheim, as well as such writers and producers as Thomas Mann and Louis B. Mayer.

As a professional screenwriter, Frederica quickly learned that scripts and story ideas were frequently rewritten and that screen credit was regularly given to the wrong person. She often would be handed nothing more than a title and the name of a star, and from that she would develop a screenplay. The plots studio executives wanted to see were usually well-worn, but it was the writer’s job to develop the innovative situations and scintillating dialogue that would bring the picture to life.

For over twenty years, Frederica and her friends struggled to survive in this incredibly competitive environment. She watched many decent, talented people lose their way to the pull of sex and drugs. She thought many times about leaving the business, only to be drawn back to others, including her husband, a successful New York film producer who also foundered in the politics of Hollywood.

Through it all, Frederica remained a passionate, outspoken woman in an industry ran by powerful men, and her provocative, nonconformist ways brought her both success and failure. Her revealing memoir offers a unique perspective on the film industry and Hollywood culture in their early days and illuminates the plight of Hollywood writers working within the Hollywood system.

FREDERICA SAGOR MAAS, still feisty at nearly 100, lives in La Jolla, California.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 264 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 637 g (22,5 oz) – PUBLISHER The University Press of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 1999 – ISBN 0-8131-2122-1

Shoot Out: Surviving Fame and (Mis)Fortune in Hollywood (Peter Bart, Peter Guber)

bart-peter-en-guber-peter-shoot-outHollywood thrives on shoot outs – that series of standoffs, skirmishes, and power struggles that mark every stage of the filmmaking process. Whether it’s a director insisting on a final cut, a star demanding a bigger trailer, a producer holding the line on the budget, or a grip with a gripe, the world of moviemaking is fraught with confrontation and conflict. In the midst of the chaos, creativity struggles with commerce. Yet somehow, a few flickering images make it to the silver screen to enthrall millions.

Shoot Out is more than a recounting of chasing egos and infamous battles. In the hands of two of the entertainment industry’s best-known pundits, Peter Bart and Peter Guber, the story of how and why a film gets made is told with rare insight, intelligence, and candor.

From the “Eureka!” of the original idea until the denouement of a film’s appearance on late-night television, Shoot Out recounts the rise and fall of the studio system, the emergence of stars as “brands,” the dynamic role of the independents, and the impact of new media on the ever-changing landscape of Hollywood. Most intriguing, the book reveals the repeated and often unheeded lessons of the past, as well as an extraordinary vision of the future.

PETER BART, a former top studio executive, is the editor in chief of Variety. He is the author of several books, including The Gross, Who Killed Hollywood? and Fade Out. PETER GUBER, chairman of Mandalay Entertainment and former chairman of Sony Pictures Entertainment, has produced many major films, ranging from Batman to Rain Man. He is a professor at UCLA’s School of Theater, Film and Television and cofounding chairman of the Producers Program. Among the classes he inaugurated is “Shoot Out,” which he teaches with Peter Bart.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 278 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 15,5 cm (9,3 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 606 g (21,4 oz) – PUBLISHER G. P. Putnam’s Sons, New York, New York, 2002 – ISBN 0-399-14808-6

A Short History of Cahiers du Cinéma (Emilie Bickerton)

Bickerton, Emilie - A Short Story of Cahiers du CinemaCahiers du cinéma was the single most influential project in the history of film. Founded in 1951, it was responsible for establishing film as the ‘seventh art,’ equal to literature, painting or music, and it revolutionized film-making and writing. Its contributors would put their words into action: the likes of Godard, Truffaut, Rivette, Rohmer were to become some of the greatest directors of the age, their films part of the internationally celebrated nouvelle vague.

In this authoritative new history, Emilie Bickerton explores the evolution and impact of Cahiers du cinéma, from its early years, to its late-sixties radicalization, its internationalization, and its response to the television age of the seventies and eighties. Showing how the story of Cahiers continues to resonate with critics, practitioners and the film-going public, A Short History of Cahiers du cinéma is a testimony to the extraordinary legacy and archive these ‘collected pages of a notebook’ have provided for the world of cinema.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 150 pp. – Dimensions 20,5 x 13,5 cm (8,1 x 5,3 inch) – Weight 295 g (10,4 oz) – PUBLISHER Verso, London, 2009 – ISBN 978-1-84467-232-5

A Short Time for Insanity: An Autobiography (William A. Wellman; foreword by Richard Schickel)

wellman-william-a-a-short-time-for-insanityThe man who made such successful motion pictures as Wings, The Public Enemy, A Star is Born, Beau Geste, Battleground, and The High and the Mighty, and also made such flops as The Boob and Stingaree, could not be expected to write a conventional autobiography. What it is, is a piece of insanity.

From the perspective of a hospital bed, through a drug-induced haze, Wellman’s memory makes connections between events in life that his rational mind would never perceive – between a child’s first hunting trip and a drunken weekend with Spencer Tracy, between working with Clark Gable and a recalcitrant St. Bernard in Call of the Wild and working with Ernie Pyle and real fighting troops in G.I. Joe, and between the friendship and courage and sorrow of flying in the Lafayette Escadrille and everything that ever happened in the rest of his life.

What it is, is a beautiful insight into the mind of a man who would have been called a genius if there’d been anybody willing to risk a black eye by calling him that. What it is, is a good and moving and funny and warm and honest – and a little crazy. Exactly like William Wellman.

But Richard Schickel in his foreword says it best: “On nothing stronger than aspirin, Bill Wellman is a free-form conversationalist, a man who’s mind just naturally perceives relationships between ideas and incidents the rest of us don’t notice. It’s part of what makes him so much fun to be with, part of what makes him seem forever young. What I’ve been saying here is that Bill Wellman is an American original, a spiky, self-reliant character, whose particular pleasure is to invent his own highly individualistic solutions to the problems of life and art and not to give a damn whether or not anyone else approves of them. It’s my powerful feeling that we don’t make men like him anymore and that most of our problems in this country stem from that sad fact. He’s going to snort when he reads this, but I love him. He has been a valuable example to me, and with this book I think he’s about to become a valuable example for a lot of other people. If he doesn’t, that’s their problem – and we’re in worse shape than I thought we were.”

In the halcyon days of Hollywood, Bill Wellman was known as a difficult man to get to know – hard and tough and more than a little fearsome. Still just as tough and no easier to know, A Short Time for Insanity, at least makes him an easy man to love.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 276 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 680 g (24 oz) – PUBLISHER Hawthorn Books, Inc., New York, New York, 1974

The Show Biz Life (Robert Hendrickson)

Hendrickson, Robert - The Show Biz LifeThis fascinating compendium of show biz lore raises the curtain on the lives of those who have made their names on the glittering stage or the silver screen, from ancient thespians to today’s megastars. The Show Biz Life offers an astonishing wealth of both little-known facts and classic tales about the lives and loves of the stars of Hollywood’s Golden Age; the greatest actors of all time; truly bad actors of yesterday and today; acting dynasties such as the Booths, the Barrymores, and the Fondas; murders must foul – off and on the stage; animal actors and movie monsters; stories behind the Oscars and other prestigious awards; corlorful behind-the-scenes characters – demanding directors, eccentric makeup artists, daring stuntmen and stuntwomen, overbearing stage mothers, and much, much more.

A treasure trove of insightful biographies, amusing anecdotes, lighthearted lists, revealing statistics, and quirky quips, quizzes, and quotes, The Show Biz Life will endlessly entertain and enlighten every fan of theater, movies and television.

ROBERT HENDRICKSON is the author of The Literary Life and Other Curiosities and many other books. His stories and articles have appeared in numerous magazines.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 438 pp., index – Dimensions 26 x 18,5 cm (10,2 x 7,3 inch) – Weight 1.035 g (40,0 oz) – PUBLISHER Contemporary Books, Chicago, Illinois, 1999 – ISBN 0-8092-3083-6

Showman: The Life of David O. Selznick (David Thomson)

Thomson, David - David O Selznick, ShowmanDavid O. Selznick, the legendary producer and maker of Gone With the Wind, is brilliantly portrayed in this full-scale biography by the first writer to be given complete access to Selznick’s voluminous and revealing papers – everything from script notes, production reports, and contract memos, to letters rich in intrugue, gambling accounts, and financial records. No other Hollywood giant ever had so much to say; no other was brave and reckless enough to leave so much on record.

Selznick was the most charming, best-read, most insanely workaholic (and most easily diverted), most talented, arrogant, hopeful, amorous, insecure, and self-destructive of all the geniuses of American moviemaking. His story is the history of the picture business, from immigrant nerve to café society. It is, as well, the story of the chronic romantic who married, first, the princess of the kingdom (Irene, daughter of Louis B. Mayer) and then a young beauty – Jennifer Jones – whom he made a princess.

Around him was a cast of vivid supporting players: his father, Lewis J., who made and lost fortunes in silent films; his two brothers – Myron, a pioneering (and boozing) agent, and Howard, whose mental condition overshadowed the rest of the family; Irene, David’s scrouge and his last comfort, as well as the person who taught him about power in Hollywood; Jock Whitney, fabulously rich, a great friend to David, and crazy about the movies; George Cukor; Alfred Hitchcock; Orson Welles; Vivien Leigh; Alexander Korda; William Paley; Ben Hecht; and John Huston.

We see Selznick making such films as What Price Glory?, King Kong, David Copperfield, A Star Is Born, Rebecca, Since You Went Away, Spellbound, Duel in the Sun, Portrait of Jennie, The Third Man, and A Farewell to Arms. And we are given the fullest possible account of the chaos, good fortune, folly, and glory of the making of Gone With the Wind.

This superb biography uncovers the lives and has done. It chronicles the Golden Age as seen from deep inside a gold mine and from behind locked doors where the spoils are divided, filched, or gambled away. In its rich sense of the wonders, ironies, and delusions inherent in showmanship, this is a book about the shape of its century, turning from reality toward the glamour, the legend – the fantasy – of the movies.

DAVID THOMSON was born in London, has taught film studies at Dartmouth College, and now lives in San Francisco. He is the author of several other books, including the acclaimed A Biographical Dictionary of the Cinema, the novels Silver Light and Suspects; and Warren Beatty: A Life and a Story. He also  wrote the screenplay for the documentary film The Making of a Legend: Gone With the Wind.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 792 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 17 cm (9,5 x 6,7 inch) – Weight 1.240 g (43,7 oz) – PUBLISHER André Deutsch, Ltd., London, 1993 – ISBN 0 233 98791 6

Show Me the Magic: My Adventures and Life in Hollywood (Paul Mazursky)

mazursky-paul-show-me-the-magicPaul Mazursky – writer, film director, actor, and producer – has created a body of work over the past thirty years that has established him as one of America’s most respected and admired filmmakers. His films are often personal, intimate, and humorous observations of the human condition.

In Show Me the Magic, Mazursky brings that same unique gift to his memoir, as he takes us behind the scenes and literally shows us the magic of a career that boasts such cinematic triumphs as Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, Harry and Tonto, Tempest, An Unmarried Woman, and Down and Out in Beverly Hills, as well as providing warm, touching, and very human portraits of many of Hollywood’s legends, including Peter Sellers, Natalie Wood, Warren Beatty, Federico Fellini, John Cassavetes, Orson Welles, and many, many more.

Born in Brownsville, Mazursky started performing in school, and in college landed his first leading role in an off-Broadway production. Shortly after that, Mazursky was cast in Stanley Kubrick’s first film, Fear and Desire, and then two years later this Jewish kid from Brooklyn appeared as a juvenile delinquent in Blackboard Jungle, starring Sidney Poitier. When stardom didn’t immediately follow, Paul turned to comedy, first as part of a comedy team playing the New York clubs, then to writing for Danny Kaye. Mazursky got into feature films when his screenplay (with Larry Tucker) for I Love You, Alice B. Toklas was made starring Dr. Strangelove himself, Peter Sellers. It was an experience Mazursky would not soon forget, a trial by fire for his introduction to filmmaking. Sellers, as brilliant as he was crazy, did everything from accuse Mazursky of sleeping with his wife, Britt Ekland, to forbidding the color purple to be worn on his movie sets. (“Purple is death,” he would shriek, and offending cast and crew would have to rush to change their clothes.)

Mazursky then made his smashing directorial debut with the then-risqué and now classic Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice. A long list of successful films followed, among them Harry and Tonto (with an Oscar-winning performance by Art Carney); the blockbuster hit Down and Out in Beverly Hills (starring Nick Nolte and Bette Midler), and Enemies, A Love Story (which earned him a New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Director).

In Show Me the Magic, Mazursky recounts his close friendsbip with famed Italian director Federico Fellini, whom Mazursky met while trying to persuade Fellini to appear in his film Alex in Wonderland; his improvised “argument” scene with Henry Jaglom in a never-released film directed by Orson Welles, as Welles, egging Mazursky on, plied him with brandy and cigars; directing the orgy scene in Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice – will they or won’t they? Everyone wondered as Elliott Gould, Dyan Cannon, Natalie Wood, and Robert Culp climbed into the king-sized bed on the closed set (there wasn’t much to worry about – Gould wore two pairs of underpants to bed); discovering that Little Richard, appearing as the neighbor in Down and Out in Beverly Hills, was Jewish and that the singer couldn’t work on the Sabbath because he had to be in temple to conduct services; being befriended by a possible KBG agent while touring Moscow as part of the research for the Robin Williams film Moscow on the Hudson, and much, much more.

Written with genuine wit and an overriding sense of affection for the people he has worked with, Show Me the Magic is a feast for fans of films and of celebrities. In addition to being a behind-the-scenes look at the making of the movies, there is a very human look at the bigger than life people with whom Mazursky has worked. And of course, there is Paul Mazursky’s own story as well – a tale of struggle and success and a joy in having been able to live a life so full of creativity and personal happiness and satisfaction. Anecdotal, personal, warm, and frequently very, very funny, Show Me the Magic is a special treat for lovers of film and of witty biography.

PAUL MAZURSKY lives with his wife in Beverly Hills.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 270 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 594 g (21,0 oz) – PUBLISHER Simon & Schuster, New York, New York, 1999 – ISBN 0-684-84735-3

Show People: Profiles in Entertainment (Kenneth Tynan)

Tynan, Kenneth - Show PeopleThere is no more astute, literate and masterly critic of the theater than Kenneth Tynan, whose own experience in England’s National Theatre gives him a special knowledge and vantage point.

In this brilliant book, full of insight and penetrating perception, Tynan examines several aspects of what might, for want of a better phrase, be called “Show Business,” probing deeply into the talents, genius and characters of five major figures who represent different facets of theatricality and entertainment.

The first is that subtle, enigmatic, suave master of the English theater, Sir Ralph Richardson, whose evasive, complex and robust charm Tynan portrays with extraordinary sympathy and accuracy, while grappling for the solid genius of the great actor that Sir Ralph indubitably is.

Turning from the classical theater to the entertainment business at its zenith, he gives us an intimate, surprising and fascinating portrait of Johnny Carson, which reveals, for the first time, the man and his very special talents. Next, he gives us a dazzling turn with the gifted English playwright Tom Stoppard, and then moves on to the world of comedy, with a long and thoughtful piece on Mel Brooks, the creator of The Producers, Silent Movie and High Anxiety, a perfect example of the kind of contradiction that lies at the heart of comedy.

Finally, Tynan, in a piece of brilliant and evocative writing, recalls the glamorous years of the motion picture business, in a portrait of Louise Brooks, the great silent-screen beauty. The result is a marvelous book that explores the very nature of talent and entertainment in all its forms, and confirms, once again, Kenneth Tynan’s reputation as a writer and a critic.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 317 pp. – Dimensions 20 x 14,5 cm (7,9 x 5,7 inch) – Weight 429 g (15,1 oz) – PUBLISHER Simon & Schuster, New York, New York, 1997 – ISBN 0-671-25012-4

Shut Up He Explained: The Memoir of a Blacklisted Kid (Kate Lardner)

lardner-kate-shut-up-he-explainedWith a wicked sense of humor and a born writer’s perfect timing, Kate Lardner conjures up the Hollywood of the McCarthy era. In this kaleidoscopic and irresistible memoir, Lardner brings to life her jumbled childhood in a household of artistically talented, larger-than-life grown-ups. When Kate was not yet two, her father, David, was killed while on assignment for The New Yorker in war-torn Germany. Two years later her mother, the actress Frances Chaney, married David’s brother, Ring Lardner, Jr. – a marriage that endured for more than fifty years. Ring was already a successful screenwriter, having won an Oscar for co-writing the Katharine Hepburn-Spencer Tracy hit Woman of the Year. (In 1971 he collected another one for M*A*S*H). Shortly after they were married, Ring was called to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee. Asked about his membership in Hollywood’s Communist Party, Lardner said: “I could answer…but if I did, I would hate myself in the morning.” This  much-publicized declaration of silence sent Lardner to prison. Subsequently neither he nor Frances could get work, which marked the beginning of Kate’s blacklist childhood – and took the family from Mexico City to rural Connecticut to Manhattan.

Kate Lardner presents a vivid behind-the-scenes look at the personal and family costs of weathering this ruthless and absurd period in history. She writes: “I wanted to tell my story of the events I had inherited. A therapist once told me she had the dirty job of ushering me into the real world. And now that I am more or less there, I’ve decided the time has come.”

KATE LARDNER is the third generation of one of America’s most distinguished families of writers. Her grandfather, Ring Lardner, Sr., was a celebrated sportswriter and short-story master, and her father and his three brothers were all writers too. Kate Lardner lives in New York City with her daughter Maude. This is her first book.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 272 pp., index – Dimensions 21,5 x 14 cm (8,5 x 5,5 inch) – Weight 416 g (14,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Ballantine Books, New York, New York, 2004 – ISBN 0-345-45514-2

Sidney Poitier: Man, Actor, Icon (Aram Goudsouzian)

goudzouzian-aram-sidney-poitierIn the first full biography of legendary actor Sidney Poitier, Aram Goudsouzian analyzes the life and career of Hollywood’s only black leading man during the civil rights era, from his childhood in the Bahamas to his 2002 Oscar for lifetime achievement. Poitier is a gifted actor, a great American success story, an intriguing personality, and a political symbol. As Goudsouzian details, Poitier’s past illuminates America’s racial history.

In films like Blackboard Jungle, The Defiant Ones, and A Raisin in the Sun, Poitier’s middle-class, mannered, virtuous screen persona contradicted prevailing film portrayals of blacks as half-wits, comic servants, or oversexed threats. His screen image and public support of nonviolent integration assuaged the fears of a broad political center. In 1964, with the nation’s liberal goodwill at its peak, Poitier won an Academy Award for his role as a genial handyman in Lilies of the Field.

Through readings of every Poitier film, Goudsouzian shows that Poitier’s characters often made sacrifices for the good of whites and rarely displayed sexuality. This model won its greatest acceptance in 1967 and 1968, when To Sir, With Love, In the Heat of the Night, and Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner each topped box-office charts and a Gallup poll tabbed Poitier America’s favorite movie star. By 1970, however, Poitier was the target of a backlash from film critics and black radicals, as the new heroes of “blaxploitation” movies reversed the Poitier model.

In the 1970s, Poitier shifted his considerable talents toward directing, starring in, and producing popular movies that employed many African Americans, both on and off screen. After a long hiatus, he returned to starring roles in the late 1980s. More recently, the film industry has reappraised his career, and Poitier has received numerous honors recognizing his work for black equality in Hollywood. As this biography affirms, Poitier remains one of American popular culture’s foremost symbols of the possibilities for and limits of racial equality.

ARAM GOUDSOUZIAN teaches history at the University of Memphis.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 480 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 847 g (29,9 oz) – PUBLISHER The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 2004 – ISBN 0-8078-2843-2

A Siegel Film: An Autobiography (Don Siegel; foreword by Clint Eastwood)

Siegel, Don - A Siegel Film‘He may have more intelligent information to transmit to young filmmakers than any other working director today.’ Clint Eastwood

Don Siegel was one of Hollywood’s most controversial directors. Invasion of the Body Snatchers is one of the very few acknowledged science-fiction classics, and ‘Dirty Harry’ Callahan with its catch-phrase ‘Make my day’ – has become part of our modern consciousness. Siegel’s five-film collaboration with Clint Eastwood created a body of films that are as distinctive as they are different, and enriched both their reputationns.

This autobiography has all the fun and energy one would expect from Don Siegel. From his first days as an assistant editor in the Warner Brothers cutting rooms, Siegel charts his rich and varied career. This is a wonderful book of reminiscences, told in a lively and vivid style, whose cast of characters includes John Wayne, Lee Marvin, Steve McQueen, Bogart and Bacall, studio head Jack Warner and other luminaries of the golden age of the Hollywood studios (including a fading film star called Ronald Reagan, whose last film, The Killers, was directed by Siegel). At the centre of the book is Siegel’s relationship with Clint Eastwood, whose directing career was encouraged by Siegel, and who supplies an amusing and appreciative foreword to the book.

Softcover – 500 pp. – Dimensions 21,5 x 13,5 cm (8,5 x 5,3 inch) – Weight 378 g (13,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Faber and Faber, London, 1993 – ISBN 0-571-17831-6

The Sieve of Time: The Memoirs of Leni Riefenstahl (Leni Riefenstahl; originally titled Memoiren)

Riefenstahl, Leni - The Sieve of TimeFor her seventy-fifth birthday Stern magazine wanted to write the story of Leni Riefenstahl’s life but she refused, feeling that only she could do justice to such a task. Fifteen years later, to mark her ninetieth birthday, here are her remarkable memoirs.

Leni Riefenstahl began her career as a dancer, employed by Max Reinhardt, in the early 1920s. In 1925 she made her film debut as an actress in The Holy Mountain, filmed in the Alps by Arnold Fanck, the father of the mountain cult in the Weimar cinema. In the late twenties Riefenstahl became the high priestess of this cult, starring in The White Hell of Piz Palü (1929), Storms over Mont Blanc (1930) and The Blue Light (1931) which she co-authored, directed, produced and played a leading role in, winning a silver medal at the Venice Biennale in 1932. In 1933 she made her last film for Fanck, SOS Iceberg, before being appointed top national film executive by Hitler, who greatly admired her work.

Commissioned to make a full-length film of a Nazi Party rally, she produced Triumph of the Will (1934). This authentic documentary of its time was at the centre of continuing controversy after the war because of its alleged Nazi propaganda content. It won gold medals at the 1935 Venice Biennale and the 1937 World’s Fair in Paris. It was followed by her classic documentary Olympia, a four-hour epic film of the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games.

After the war, as a result of her artistic association with Hitler, Riefenstahl was subject to denazification tribunals. Although she was officially cleared of being a Nazi, the allegations of political complicity and romantic involvement with Hitler continued.

Difficulties at home led her to Africa where her interest in the Nuba and their natural environment inspired her to new artistic heights, resulting in two rare books of photographs The Last of the Nuba and The People of Kau.

At the age of seventy-two she took up deep-sea diving. Her book Wonders Under Water (Quartet 1991) is a unique collection of photographs from her dives in the Red Sea, the Caribbean, the Indian Ocean and the Maldives which she undertook aged eighty-eight.

LENI RIEFENSTAHL has written a book of breadth and passion which spans the century and chronicles a rare life.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 669 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 15,5 cm (9,5 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 1.230 g (43,4 oz) – PUBLISHER Quartet Books, Ltd., London, 1992 – ISBN 0 7043 7021 2

Sight and Sound Film Review, Volume May 1991 to April 1992

scannen0330Hardcover – 289 pp., index (film titles / directors) – Dimensions 30,5 x 23 cm (12 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 847 g (29,9 oz) – PUBLISHER British Film Institute, London, 1991-1992

Sight and Sound Film Review, Volume May 1992 to December 1992

scannen0330Hardcover – 179 pp., index (film titles / directors) – Dimensions 30,5 x 23 cm (12 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 1.225 g (43,2 oz) – PUBLISHER British Film Institute, London, 1992

Sight and Sound Film Review, Volume January 1993 to December 1993

scannen0330Hardcover – 252 pp., index (film titles / directors) – Dimensions 30,5 x 23 cm (12 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 1.130 g (39,9 oz) – PUBLISHER British Film Institute, London, 1993

Sight and Sound Film Review, Volume January 1994 to December 1994

scannen0330Hardcover – 274 pp., index (film titles / directors) – Dimensions 30,5 x 23 cm (12 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 1.235 g (43,6 oz) – PUBLISHER British Film Institute, London, 1994

Sight and Sound Film Review, Volume January 1995 to December 1995

scannen0330Hardcover – 252 pp., index (film titles / directors) – Dimensions 30,5 x 23 cm (12 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 1.130 g (39,9 oz) – PUBLISHER British Film Institute, London, 1995

Sight and Sound Film Review, Volume January 1996 to December 1996

scannen0330Hardcover – 264 pp., index (film titles / directors) – Dimensions 30,5 x 23 cm (12 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 1.140 g (40,2 oz) – PUBLISHER British Film Institute, London, 1996

Sight and Sound Film Review, Volume January 1997 to December 1997

scannen0330Hardcover – 280 pp., index (film titles / directors) – Dimensions 30,5 x 23 cm (12 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 1.155 g (40,7 oz) – PUBLISHER British Film Institute, London, 1997

Sight and Sound Film Review, Volume January 1998 to December 1998

scannen0330Hardcover – 304 pp., index (film titles / directors) – Dimensions 30,5 x 23 cm (12 x 9,1 inch) – Weight 1.225 g (43,2 oz) – PUBLISHER British Film Institute, London, 1998

The Signet Book of Movie Lists (Jeff Rovin)

rovin-jeff-the-signet-book-of-movie-listings“Welcome to The Signet Book of Movie Lists, a gathering of facts and fun from the world of film. We’ve tried hard to provide an entertaining and original package: all entries are published here for the first time, and the celebrity lists were collected firsthand for this volume. As you will see, we’ve covered a broad spectrum of subjects, from Donald Duck to the screen’s costliest movies to films about boxing. Our only restriction was that the motion pictures discussed had to be theatrical releases. We did not include movies made for television – fine as some are – or edited to feature length from episodes of TV series. Those will be the subject of a future book. In the meantime, if you have any comments about The Signet Book of Movie Lists, please write to us. Your suggestions will be helpful in shaping future volumes.” – The Preface.

The films, the stars, the stories – a list lover’s close-up view of the most expensive motion pictures ever created; the longest film titles; the greatest grossers; incredible firsts; Academy Award record holders; the immortal monster and sci-fi movies; stunts that cost performers life and limb; the top-selling soundtrack albums; actors who directed themselves; movies about boxing and football; top Hollywood stars list their personal favorites.

Softcover – 167 pp. – Dimensions 18 x 10,5 cm (7,1 x 4,1 inch) – Weight 117 g (4,1 oz) – PUBLISHER New American Library, New York, New York, 1979

Silent Cinema (Brian J. Robb)

Robb, Brian J - Silent CinemaThrough a study of the earliest origins of cinema to the stars, comedians and directors who became popular from the late-Victorian era to the end of the 1920s, and including a look at the earliest Hollywood scandals of the time, Silent Cinema will be a handy guide to the art of cinema’s silent years in Hollywood and across the globe.

BRIAN J. ROBB is a writer and biographer whose previous books have included a New York Times best-selling biography of Leonardo DiCaprio; Screams & Nightmares, the definitive book on horror director Wes Craven; biographies of Johnny Depp and Ewan McGregor; and Counterfeit Worlds, a study of the films of Philip K. Dick. He is Managing Editor at Titan Magazines and Editor of the Official Star Wars Magazine. He has also written Pocket Essentials on Ridley Scott, Lauren and Hardy, and James Cameron.

The accompanying region free DVD – Sunrise Silent’s Silent Cinema Stars – includes lengthy excerpts from films including Son of the Sheik, Phantom of the Opera, The Perils of Pauline, Salome and Orphans of the Storm, and features classic performances from stars such as Mary Pickford, Harold Lloyd, Lon Chaney, Louise Brooks, Mabel Normand, John Barrymore, Clara Bow, Buster Keaton, Gloria Swanson and Greta Garbo.

Softcover – 159 pp., index – Dimensions 19,5 x 13,5 cm (7,7 x 5,3 inch) – Weight 330 g (11,6 oz) – PUBLISHER Kamera Books, London, 2007 – ISBN 978-1-9040-4863-3

Silent Echos: Discovering Early Hollywood Through Films of Buster Keaton (John Bengston; foreword by Kevin Brownlow)

Bengtson, John - Silent Echoes“Los Angeles is the most photographed town in the world. A fascinating film could be made showing its architectural progress simply by using exteriors from the thousands of films shot in its streets.

It was footage of the Los Angeles area, appearing in the first films to be made in California, that precipitated the incredible population explosion. Cameramen would select the prettiest street corner, wait until the light was right, and, when they saw the movie, a few hundred more disillusioned Easterners and mid-Westerners would pack their bags. And how attractive Los Angeles was when pictures were silent, and Buster Keaton was making his comedies. In Keaton’s day, Hollywood was as close as any town could get to paradise. With a backdrop of hills, Sunset Boulevard was still rural enough to have a bridle path down the middle. Buster’s studio already had a noble heritage, having been the headquarters of Charlie Chaplin under the romantic name of the Lone Star Studio. Nearby was the classical façade of the administration building of the Metro Company, which released Keaton’s films, and where Valentino appeared in The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse.

Hollywood still had all the attributes of a small town. The original inhabitants – mid-Western prohibitionists – may once have been shocked by the sudden arrival of the picture people, but by the 1920s most people appreciated the source of the town’s prosperity. One should add – for it is easy to lose sight of this in modern Hollywood – that the picture pioneers were remarkably pleasant people. I interviewed scores of them, including Keaton, and they were the most extraordinary characters I ever met, enthusiastic about their work, full of excitement, humour, and charm – and they retained these qualities into their old age. On the other hand, Hollywood itself has grown a bit raddled. Whenever any of the veterans took me for a tour of the place, they invariably got lost and sighed deeply for the old days. All the old landmarks seem to have been ruthlessly bulldozed, from D. W. Griffith’s studio at the junction of Sunset and Hollywood Boulevards (now a superrnarket) to Lot Three at MGM (now a condominium development). One assumed that evidence of the old Los Angeles, the old Hollywood, lay only in photographs and motion pictures.

And then came John Bengtson. Thanks to his sixth sense, his detective’s nose, and historian’s tenacity, we can discover scores of locations that we had assumed had been flattened. He gives an entirely new level of interest to the city. Of course, changes occur every day and more and more buildings are demolished, so you’d better hurry if you want to see these locations. But either way, he has provided an excellent record, and he will have given new heart to other researchers.

I envy John Bengtson’s achievement as much as I admire it, because I have had a go at this sort of thing myself. With David Gill, I prowled the streets of L.A. and went to Cottage Grove, in Oregon, to film locations for our documentary Buster Keaton A Hard Act to Follow. Despite all the resources of Thames Television and eager researchers, we did not find out nearly as much as Bengtson did on his own.

I suspect he may have invented a new art form. Certainly it’s a godsend for film enthusiasts. Let us hope more of his location surveys appear in the future.” – The Foreword by Kevin Brownlow.

John Bengston has created a unique visual history of early Hollywood and other vintage locations as depicted in Buster Keaton’s classic movies. Combining images from Keaton’s films with archival photographs, historic maps, and scores of dramatic “then” and “now” photos, Silent Echoes reveals dozens of movie locations that lay undiscovered for nearly 80 years.

Part-time mechanic, part detective story, Silent Echoes presents a fresh look at the matchless Keaton at work, as well as a captivating glimpse of Hollywood’s most romantic era. More than a book for film, comedy, or history buffs, Silent Echoes appeals to anyone fascinated with solving puzzles or witnessing the awesome passage of time.

Softcover – 232 pp. – Dimensions 21,5 x 28 cm (8,5 x 11 inch) – Weight 666 g (23,5 oz) – PUBLISHER Santa Monica Press LLC, Santa Monica, California, 2000 – ISBN 1-891661-06-X

Silent Magic: Rediscovering the Silent Film Era (Ivan Butler; foreword by Kevin Brownlow)

Butler, Ivan - Silent Magic“The revival of interest in the silent years has been unprecedented, stimulated largely by the restoration of films that for years have been known only by name and by the enterprise and adventurousness of television companies in backing such notable work. Silent enthusiasts, whose numbers are steadily increasing, owe an incalculable debt to such miracles of reclamation as those achieved by Kevin Brownlow and David Gill, accompanied by the wonderful scores of Carl Davis; by Raymond Rohauer and others who have rescued desintegrating or long-lost prints; to television screenings of expertly shortened versions of such classics as D.W. Griffith’s Orphans of the Storm and Blood and Sand with Rudolph Valentino, with an excellent informative commentary.

Much literature is now available on the subject, but for many years it has been written (often superbly) by writers too young to remember in person what ‘going to the pictures’ in the silent days was like. This book is intended as a first-hand account, mainly of the 1920s, based as far as possible on personal memory, by someone of an age to have ‘been there’ at the time. Simply by what might be described as natural wastage our numbers are diminishing year by year and soon there will be nobody left to record, from experience, something of a period that is already part of history. (…) I saw my first film in 1915…” – From The Introduction.

Hardcover – 208 pp., index – Dimensions 27,5 x 20 cm (10,8 x 7,9 inch) – Weight 879 g (31,0 oz) – PUBLISHER Columbus Books, Ltd., London, 1987 – ISBN 0 86287 315 0

Silent Movies (Neil Sinyard)

Sinyard, Neil - Silent MoviesFor many film fans and historians the silent era is still the cinema’s golden age, a period of experiment, innovation and excitement. In only three decades, cinema leapt from being crude technological novelty to a new universal language and mass-entertainment industry.

Most of the major film genres – Westerns, war films, horror movies, epics, documentaries – evolved during this period. In the case of comedy, silent movies not only prompted an outpouring of breathtaking inventiveness, but also produced some of the greatest comic names of the century: Buster Keaton, the Keystone Cops, Harold Lloyd, and, of course, Charlie Chaplin. In addition to the comedians, other stars acquired definite images that few ever really lost. Mary Pickford became ‘America’s Sweetheart,’ Rudolph Valentino the smouldering Latin lover, Douglas Fairbanks the swashbuckling hero, and Lillian Gish the heroine of fragile beauty. Public perceptions of the stars combined with the newspapers’ insatiable demand for gossip affected their private lives, too. Mary Pickford, for example, suffered agonies over her divorce, wondering if the public would condemn her by shunning her films and thus end her career.

The arrival of sound effectively killed silent movies – and the careers of some of the stars – but their appeal has endured. Despite the persistent lure of special effects wizardry in modern films, silent films such as Napoleon, Intolerance, and Battleship Potemkin are being restored and shown to a new generation of enthusiasts. The work of some of the movie legends is being revived, and Rudolph Valentino, Gloria Swanson, and Douglas Fairbanks are gaining new fans.

Neil Sinyard traces the rise and fall of silent movies from their jerky beginnings in the Lumière studios in Paris to the early days in Hollywood where the movie industry took root and began its bewitching domination.

Illustrated with over 200 pictures, Silent Movies is an authoritative and fascinating account of what many believe to be cinema’s finest hour, and a vital addition to the library of every film buff.

NEIL SINYARD is a regular contributor to publications of the National Film Theatre and writes reviews and articles for such magazines as Sight and Sound, The Movie and Films and Filming. He contributes regularly to Magill’s Cinema Annual and recently contributed to Magill’s Survey of Cinema: Foreign Language Films. His books include Journey Down Sunset Boulevard: The Films of Billy Wilder, The Films of Richard Lester, The Films of Steven Spielberg, The Films of Woody Allen, The Films of Mel Gibson, Marilyn, Classic Movies, Directors: The All-Time Greats, Filming Literature and (as editorial consultant) All-Time Box-Office Hits.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 192 pp., index – Dimensions 31 x 23,5 cm (12,2 x 9,3 inch) – Weight 1.145 g (40,4 oz) – PUBLISHER Bison Books, Ltd., London, 1990 – ISBN 0-86124-619-5

Silent Movies: The Birth of Film and the Triumph of Movie Culture (Peter Kobel and the Library of Congress; foreword by Martin Scorsese; introduction by Kevin Brownlow)

kobel-peter-silent-moviesDrawing on the Library of Congress’s massive collection of silent films and film memorabilia, Silent Movies explores the fascinating world of silent film, from its birth in the 1890s with the earliest narrative shorts, to the brilliant full-length features of the 1920s. The producers, directors, and actors in silent movies created an art form and established a narrative and visual style that continue to this day. At the same time, silent movies created a new kind of celebrity – the movie star – and movie executives quickly learned how valuable a marketing vehicle the early stars could be. Douglas Fairbanks, Greta Garbo, Clara Bow, Louise Brooks, Harold Lloyd, John Gilbert, and dozens of others appear here in all their glory.

Silent Movies explores the birth of film technologies, including color photography and sound effects; the importance of silent movies from around the world; the innovation of marketing and promotion through posters, fan magazines, and lobby cards; the rise of the director, from D.W. Griffith to Erich von Stroheim to King Vidor; as well as the restoration work being spearheaded by the Library of Congress, Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola, and others. Lavishly and lovingly illustrated with more than 400 posters, paper prints, film stills, and other images – most of which have never been published before – Silent Movies will take its place as the defining work on this fascinating aspect of American culture.

PETER KOBEL is the former managing editor of Premiere magazine and has written for the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Wall Street Journal, and Entertainment Weekly. MARTIN SCORSESE is an Academy Award-winning director and one of the most respected and influential filmmakers working today. He also serves as president of the Film Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to film preservation. KEVIN BROWNLOW is a noted film historian and has written extensively on early film, including the books The Parade’s Gone By and Behind the Mask of Innocence. The Library of Congress endeavors to gather a record of human knowledge and to provide the broadest possible access to that information. Founded in 1800 for the use of members of the United States Congress, it has been open to the public since the 1870s. Today it is the world’s largest library, comprising more than 120 million items, including the world’s largest film archive.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 301 pp., index – Dimensions 31 x 24 cm (12,2 x 9,5 inch) – Weight 2.110 g (74,4 oz) – PUBLISHER Little, Brown and Company / Hachette Book Group USA, New York, New York, 2007 – ISBN 978-0-316-11791-3

Silent Players: A Biographical and Autobiographical Study of 100 Silent Film Actors and Actresses (Anthony Slide)

slide-anthony-silent-playersFilled with little known facts and personal remembrances of the stars of the silent screen, Silent Players profiles the lives and careers of the hundred best, brightest, or most unusual silent film actors and actresses. Anthony Slide shows that the unlikely plot twists in many silent films are nothing compared to the strange and often sad lives led by many of the men and women whose images flickered onscreen.

His subjects include shining stars Lillian Gish and Blanche Sweet, leading men William Bakewell and Robert Harron, gifted leading ladies Laura La Plante and Alice Terry, ingénues Mary Astor and Mary Brian, and Hollywood’s most famous extra, Bess Flowers, among others. As Slide explores their unique talents and extraordinary private lives, the result is a series of insightful portraits of the characters who symbolize an original and pioneering era in motion picture history.

In addition to being a lively book at the lives and careers of so many of the American silent cinema’s leading men and women, Silent Players also offers fascinating insight into silent film performance, from makeup to acting techniques and pantomime to the role of the director. Actress Ethel Grandin recalls the first panorama shot in the film Traffic in Souls, and actor Harold Lloyd explains how his comic films began with nothing more than a cast of characters and a few locations and emerged with plot and structure exactly nine hundred feet of film – a one-reeler – later.

Slide offers a completely fresh view of many of the stars he profiles, repudiating the status of some and restoring the fame of others who have slipped from the view. He personally interviewed many of his subjects and knew several of them intimately, putting him in a unique position to tell the true stories of early film’s most vibrant and appealing personalities.

ANTHONY SLIDE, and independent film scholar, archivist, and consultant, has published over fifty pioneering works on film and entertainment.

[Contents: Mignon Anderson, Mary Astor, William Bakewell, Theda Bara, Lina Basquette, Madge Bellamy, Constance Binney, Priscilla Bonner, Hobart Bosworth, Evelyn Brent, Mary Brian, Gladys Brockwell, Kate Bruce, John Bunny, Lon Chaney, Charlie Chaplin, Ruth Clifford, Elmer Clifton, Miriam Cooper, Pauline Curley, Viola Dana, Bebe Daniels, Philippe De Lacy, Carol Dempster, Dorothy Devore, Richard Dix, Billie Dove, Claire DuBrey, Douglas Fairbanks, Virginia Browne Faire, Bess Flowers, Greta Garbo, Howard Gaye, Lillian Gish, Louise Glaum, Dagmar Godowsky, Kitty Gordon, Jetta Goudal, Ethel Grandin, Ralph Graves, Gilda Gray, Olga Grey, Corinne Griffith, Robert Harron, William S. Hart, Alice Howell, Alice Hollister, Alice Joyce, Buster Keaton, Madge Kennedy, Doris Kenyon, J. Warren Kerrigan, Laura La Plante, Harold Lloyd, Ben London, Bessie Love, Ben Lyon, Dorothy Mackaill, Mary MacLaren, Percy Marmont, Mae Marsh, James Morrison, Jack Mulhall, Mae Murray, Conrad Nagel, Nita Naldi, Mabel Normand, Jane Novak, George O’Brien, Gertrude Olmstead, Seena Owen, Jean Paige, Kathryn Perry, Olga Petrova, Mary Philbin, Mary Pickford, Arline Pretty, Esther Ralston, Charles Ray, Wallace Reid, Billie Rhodes, Charles ‘Buddy’ Rogers, Clarine Seymour, Lowell Sherman, Pauline Starke, Valeska Suratt, Gloria Swanson, Blanche Sweet, Constance Talmadge, Norma Talmadge, Alice Terry, Florence Turner, Rudolph Valentino, George Walsh, Henry B. Walthall, Lois Wilson, Margery Wilson, Claire Windsor, Fay Wray]

Hardcover, dust jacket – 439 pp., index – Dimensions 26 x 18 cm (10,2 x 7,1 inch) – Weight 1.180 g (41,6 oz) – PUBLISHER The University Press of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 2002 – ISBN 0-8131-2249-X

The Silent Screen (Richard Dyer MacCann)

dyer-maccann-richard-the-silent-screenThere is a great deal of pleasure to be gained from the first thirty years of American movies, even without seeing the movies. The Silent Screen is dedicated to guiding readers through some of those pleasures. The book highlights the main events, the leading lights, and the films that mattered. It is a selective history for those who want to be informed without being overwhelmed, who would like to know enough about the silent era to feel at home there, respect its artists, and admire their work. Culled from the author’s five previous anthologies, The First Tycoons, The First Film Makers, The Stars Appear, The Silent Comedians, and Films of the 1920s, The Silent Screen stands alone as an inclusive series of essays for general readers. An added value to the introductory text are eleven appendixes, which include information on silent film companies, early film executives, notable directors, and a listing of the titles and directors of films reviewed in the first five volumes.

Professor RICHARD DYER MacCANN has taught at USC, Kansas, and Iowa, and was for ten years editor of Cinema Journal for the Society for Cinema Studies. From 1951 to 1960 he was Hollywood correspondent for The Christian Science Monitor. He has produced a number of works on radio, film, and videotape, including Degas: Master of Motion at USC and the Iowa “Quiet Channel” series, and is the author of forty published articles and six books, including Hollywood in Transition, Film: A Montage of Theories, and The People’s Films.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 248 pp., index – Dimensions 22 x 14,5 cm (8,7 x 5,7 inch) – Weight 542 g (19,1 oz) – PUBLISHER The Scarecrow Press, Inc., Lanham, Maryland in association with Image & Idea, Iowa City, Iowa, 1997 – ISBN 0-8108-3368-9

A Silent Siren Song: The Aitken Brothers’ Hollywood Odyssey, 1905-1926 (Al P. Nelson, Mel R. Jones)

nelson-al-p-a-silent-siren-songA Silent Siren Song traces the journey of Harry (1877-1956) and Roy (1882-1972) Aitken, two brothers from the Wisconsin farmlands who pioneered the studio system of Hollywood’s Golden Age. Combining production, distribution, and theater operations under their Triangle Film Corporation, the young upstarts created the most dynamic studio in Hollywood. They attracted the greatest directors and stars of the day – including D.W. Griffith, Mary Pickford, Lillian Gish, Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle, and Douglas Faribanks, Sr. – and produced some of the most enduring films of the silent era, from the Keystone Cops to the defining cinematic epic The Birth of a Nation. Nelson and Jones provide an in-depth look at the ambition, money, and ego that fueled the highly competitive early movie industry, where the Aitken brothers and rivals Samuel Goldwyn, Louis B. Mayer, William Fox, Jack L. Warner, and Adolph Zukor battled it out for box-office supremacy.

AL P. NELSON (1902-1994) began his career as a journalist, editor, and publicity manager before turning to freelance writing full-time. He produced 8 books, 75 short stories, and some 5,000 articles for national, regional and business publications and taught writing at the University of Wisconsin – Madison Extension Division. A former president of the Wisconsin Regional Writers’ Association, he co-founded and edited their Creative Wisconsin magazine. He was also past president of the Council of Wisconsin Writers and a founder of the Raconteurs Writing Club. He is survived by three children, including Marion Nelson Jones, wife of A Silent Siren Song co-author Mel R. Jones. During his twenty-year military career, MEL R. JONES was a reporter, editor, speechwriter, press aide, and public affairs officer, as well as the founder and editor of the Observer, the first authorized military publication in Southeast Asia. A freelance writer and author of Above and Beyond: Eight Great American Aerobatic Champions, he has taught journalism and creative writing courses at the University of Wisconsin – Madison and Marquette University. He is a former president of the Raconteurs Writing Club. Currently, Jones is president and CEO of a public relations and marketing agency. He is married and has four children.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 252 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 15,5 cm (9,3 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 530 g (18,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Cooper Square Press, New York, New York, 2000 – ISBN 0-8154-1069-7

Silent Stars (Jeanine Basinger)

Basinger, Jeanine - Silent StarsFrom one of America’s most renowned film scholars: a revelatory, perceptive, and highly readable book at the greatest silent film stars – not those few who are fully appreciated and understood, like Chaplin, Keaton, Gish, and Garbo, but those who have been misperceived, unfairly dismissed, or forgotten.

Here is Valentino, “the Sheik,” who was hardly the affeminate lounge lizard he’s been branded as; Mary Pickford, who couldn’t have been further from the adorable little creature with golden ringlets that was her film persona; Marion Davies, unfailry pilloried in Citizen Kane, the original “Phantom” and “Hunchback,” Lon Chaney; the beautiful Talmadge sisters, Norma and Constance. Here are the great divas, Pola Negri and Gloria Swanson; the great flappers, Colleen Moore and Clara Bow; the great cowboys, William S. Hart and Tom Mix; and the great lover, John Gilbert. Here, too, is the quintessential slapstick comedienne Mabel Normand, with her Keystone Kops; the quintessential all-American hero, Douglas Fairbanks; and, of course, the quintessential all-American dog, Rin-Tin-Tin.

This is the first book to anatomize the major silent players, reconstruct their careers, and give us a sense of what those films, those stars, and that Hollywood were all about. An absolutely essential text for anyone seriously interested in movies, and, with more than three hundred photographs, as much a treat to look at as it is to read.

JEANINE BASINGER is Chair of the Film Studies Program and Corwin-Fuller Professor of Film Studies at Wesleyan University, and Curator of the Cinema Archives there. She is the author of The “It’s a Wonderful Life” Book; The World War II Combat Film; Anatomy of a Genre; Anthony Mann, American Dream: 100 Years of Cinema; and A Woman’s View: How Hollywood Spoke to Women, 1930-1960. She lives with her husband in Middletown, Connecticut.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 497 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 18 cm (9,5 x 7,1 inch) – Weight 1.325 g (46,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Alfred A. Knopf, New York, New York, 1999 – ISBN 0-679-43840-8

Silent Stars Speak: Interviews With Twelve Cinema Pioneers (Tony Villecco)

The twelve men and women featured in this collection of interviews share their memories of the early days of filmmaking, from the technicalities of lighting and production, to celebrities they encountered.

The interviewees include child star Baby Peggy, Priscilla Bonner, Virginia Cherrill, Pauline Curley, original “Our Gang” member Jean Darling, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Francis Lederer, Molly O’Day, Anita Page, Charles “Buddy” Rogers, David Rollins, and director Andrew L. Stone.

Their stories of what it was like to make a silent movie are illuminating glimpses into an era that fades with every passing year. Each interview is accompanied by a comprehensive filmography. Dozens of photographs of these celebrities and their associates are also included.

TONY VILLECCO writes for such publications as Classic Images, Films of the Golden Age and Silent Film Monthly. A classical tenor soloist, he lives in Port Crane, New York.

[Interviews with Baby Peggy, Priscilla Bonner, Virginia Cherrill, Pauline Curley, Jean Darling, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Francis Lederer, Molly O’Day, Anita Page, Charles “Buddy” Rogers, David Rollins, Andrew L. Stone]

Softcover – 194 pp., index – Dimensions 23 x 15 cm (9,1 x 5,9 inch) – Weight 282 g (9,9 oz) – PUBLISHER McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, Jefferson, North Carolina, 2001 – ISBN 0-7864-0814-6

Silent Traces: Discovering Early Hollywood Through the Films of Charlie Chaplin (John Bengston; foreword by Kevin Brownlow)

scannen0066“I was watching a silent film the other day which had been shot in the streets of South London in 1922. Those same streets would be flattened 18 years later in the Blitz. Yet there was something remarkably familiar about them. Of course! They were the same streets Chaplin had re-created in his films. Instead of London, Chaplin made his pictures in sunny and somnolent Hollywood, less like South London than almost any town you can imagine. Even so, his set designer supplied the treeless terraces, the brick walls, the bollards, and the arched alleyways that could only be South London or the East End.

Chaplin retained British citizenship all his life, to the irritation of nationalistic Americans, and remained a Londoner, too, although why he should have fond memories after the wretched experiences he and his brother were put through, I cannot imagine. Whenever he came to London, he went on nostalgic walks. (You can see home movies shot in Lambeth by Oona Chaplin on the Warner Bros. DVD of Limelight).

Earlier this year, I was taken on a tour of South London by Chaplin expert Tony Merrick and I was astonished at how much still survives from Chaplin’s era. One of the most touching moments I experienced was when I was shown the railings of Kennington Park, reproduced on the backlot in City Lights, where the blind girl sells Charlie the flower. You ignore it until it’s pointed out to you and then there is no doubt, despite the busy traffic and the nearby  underground station.

The most astonishing discovery came when Tony took us into a working man’s club, sandwiched between Georgian terraces. He had a word with the man behind the bar and took us up some steps, through the kind of cobwebbed corridor you see in Universal horror films, and into a small Edwardian theater, gaslights intact. It was due to be demolished – you could smell the mildew – but it was a wonderful surprise. A theater, we were told, where the young Charlie and his brother Syd had almost certainly performed.

Chaplin often chose his locations because they reminded him of London. The forbidding institution from which Edna Purviance remerges with her baby in The Kid always suggested to me the workhouse where the Chaplins were incarcerated. It is just the sort of place you’d imagine Los Angeles tearing down and it is thrilling to discover, thanks to John Bengtson, that it still exists.

Chinatown hardly suggests London, and yet, as we now have a Chinatown in Soho, so too did we once have a Chinatown in Limehouse, on the river. You can see it reproduced in Broken Blossoms (1919), for which D.W. Griffith combined studio sets with parts of the Los Angeles Chinatown – the same parts Chaplin uses in The Kid and in Caught in a Cabaret. That whole area has been scoured clean off the map and the district around the railroad station has lost all its atmosphere.

Los Angeles must be the fastest changing city in the world. When I first visited it in 1964, film people were bemoaning the loss of the D.W. Griffith studio – it had become, somewhat unromantically, a supermarket – and the fact that the Keystone studios had been virtually eliminated. I was taken on a tour of Sennett locations by one of Chaplin’s first leading ladies, Minta Durfee, who had married Roscoe Arbuckle. She found very little left. Forty years later, had it not been for John Bengtson’s heroic researches, virtually all traces of the silent era would likely have been erased. But look what he’s discovered!

While spectacular architectural follies, like the Hollywood Hotel or the Bradbury Mansion, have long since gone, he shows us that the firehouse where Charlie – nearly a century ago – shot The Fireman is still standing, as a Korean bridal shop.

What a debt we owe him! Bengtson’s sense of observation is so acute that he can recognize a wall which has undergone enough changes to make it unrecognizable to the rest of us. Sadly, developers do not share the same sense of history as he does. I was filming on the backlot of a Hollywood studio recently, and wanted to use glass stages from the silent era as a background. ‘Don’t show those,’ said the studio manager. ‘People might stop us tearing them down.'” – The Foreword by Kevin Brownlow.

Explore the traces of early Hollywood hidden within Charlie Chaplin’s timeless films. This stunning work of cinematic archeology combines Chaplin’s movie images with archival photographs, vintage maps, and scores of then-and-now comparison photographs to conjure up the silent-movie era from an entirely new perspective.

By describing the historical settings found in such Chaplin classics as The Kid, City Lights, and Modern Times, author John Bengston illuminates both Chaplin’s genius  and the evolving city that served as backdrop for his art. Part-time machine, part detective story, Silent Traces presents a unique look at Chaplin’s work, and a captivating glimpse into Hollywood’s most romantic era.

JOHN BENGSTON is a business lawyer and film historian who discovered the magic of silent comedy at an early age. He is the author of the critically acclaimed Silent Echoes: Discovering Early Hollywood Through the Films of Buster Keaton. Bengston has presented his work on Buster Keaton as keynote speaker at events hosted by the Academy of Motion Pictures, Arts and Sciences, the American Cinematheque at the Egyptian Theatre, and the UCLA Film and Television Archive. He is a featered columnist of the Keaton Chronicle newsletter, and lives in the San Francisco Bay area with his wife and three daughters.

Softcover – 304 pp. – Dimensions 21,5 x 28 cm (8,5 x 11 inch) – Weight 1.110 g (39,2 oz) – PUBLISHER Santa Monica Press LLC, Santa Monica, California, 2006 – ISBN 1-59580-014-X

Simone Signoret (Catherine David)

David, Catherine - Simone SignoretWhen Simone Signoret died of cancer in 1985, at the age of sixty-four, thousands of mourners, ordinary people as well as top French actors, writers and politicians, attended her funeral in Paris. She was a national figure who symbolized political and intellectual courage as well as glamour. She was a tough, self-deprecating funny and articulate woman who could swear like a trooper, drink like a sailor and argue like a courtroom lawyer. There were intriguingly paradoxical sides to her nature but she was consistently gutsy and uncompromising in her commitments – to acting, to writing, to politics and to her thirty-six-year marriage to Yves Montand.

The sole support of her family when her Jewish father fled to London during the war, she gravitated to the intellectual and bohemian circles of Left Bank Paris in the forties. She was adored by the French – and later by the whole world – for her early roles in films like Casque d’Or and Les Dialoboliques, and in 1960 she won the Academy Award for her role as Alice in the British film, Room at the Top.

The Montand / Signoret partnership was at once highly visible for its glamour and for its politics: the couple were deeply involved in left-wing politics, and were fellow-travellers until the Soviets invaded Hungary in 1956. Signoret continued to campaign for human rights until her death.

A glorious blonde beauty in her youth, Signoret seemed, almost wilfully, to hurl herself into old age after Montand’s much publicized affair with Marilyn Monroe – but this new image did bring her some marvellous mature film parts like the Jewish ex-prostitute in Madame Rosa. Yet is is the whole woman and not just the actress we confront in Catherine David’s captivating, elegantly translated book: a fiery, sensuous woman who was deeply loved by millions as much for her commanding character as for her great talent.

Simone Signoret is translated by Saly Sampson.

CATHERINE DAVID is a journalist for the Nouvel Observateur in Paris.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 213 pp. – Dimensions 23,5 x 15 cm (9,3 x 5,9 inch) – Weight 534 g (18,8 oz) – PUBLISHER Bloomsbury Publishing, Ltd., London, 1992 – ISBN 0 7475 1162 4

Sin in Soft Focus: Pre-Code Hollywood (Mark A. Vieira)

vieira-mark-a-sin-in-soft-focusIn the spring of 1934, Hollywood faced what the Los Angeles Times called “the most serious crisis of its history.” The film capital was under siege by censorship advocates who launched a boycott, demanding that the film industry enforce the Production Code it had adopted in 1930. For nearly five years, defiant producers had cited artistic freedom and flouted the Code, which forbade vulgarity, profanity, nudity, excessive violence, illegal drugs, adultery, “sex perversion,” “white slavery,” racial mingling, “lustful kissing,” and suggestive dancing. In July 1934, the controversial films were outlawed. Today they are called “pre-Code.”

Sin in Soft Focus showcases a scintillating era in film history and tells how filmmakers sidestepped the Code. The innovative Rouben Mamoulian used rhyming dialogue and musical cues to create the risqué romanticism of Myrna Loy in Love Me Tonight. The legendary Ernst Lubitsch made his camera waltz and then closed doors in its face to convey the naughty sexuality of Jeanette MacDonald in The Merry Widow. The brilliant Josef van Sternberg used lace, smoke, and soft focus to make Marlene Dietrich a glamorous prostitute in Dishonored. Following his lead, Hollywood used soft-focus filters to screen the “sinful” behavior of stars such as Joan Crawford, Greta Garbo, and Norma Shearer.

Mark A. Vieira draws on extensive research, interviews, and correspondence in the Production Code Administration files to tell the engaging, suspenseful, and often humorous story of the struggle between Hollywood and its reformers, weaving history, politics, and film into a full-blooded narrative. Lavishly illustrated with 275 film stills, many of them rare, the book captures the stunning visual artistry of the era. Among the films highlighted are Morocco, Blonde Venus, and The Devil Is a Woman, starring the exotic Marlene Dietrich; Cecil B. DeMille’s scandalous epic, The Sign of the Cross, with Claudette Colbert; tales of underworld brutality such as The Public Enemy, with James Cagney and Jean Harlow, and Scarface, with Paul Muni; Call Her Savage and Hoopla, featuring the last of Clara Bow’s sizzling performances; Mae West’s bawdy comedies; and racy musicals such as 42nd Street and The Gold Diggers of I933.

The first book to feature the pre-Code films as a discrete body of work, Sin in Soft Focus serves as an essential reference guide to the genre. The original Production Code is reproduced in its entirety, along with an inventory of 100 pre-Code films, which documents key information such as studio, cast, profit/loss data, and current availability on video.

MARK A. VIEIRA is an acclaimed photographer and film historian specializing in the photographic legacy of Hollywood. In addition to Abrams’ Hurell’s Hollywood Portraits, he has written production histories of Pre-Code films for Bright Lights Film Journal, and two pictorial surveys of Hollywood portraiture. Vieira lives in Los Angeles, California.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 31 x 23,5 cm (12,2 x 9,3 inch) – Weight 1.455 g (51,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers, New York, New York, 1999 – ISBN 0-8109-4475-8

Sisters: The Story of Olivia de Havilland and Joan Fontaine (Charles Higham)

Higham, Charles - SistersOlivia de Havilland and Joan Fontaine are the most famous pair of stage and screen sisters in America. Yet their lifelong struggle for supremacy over each other has received far less press than their respective screen triumphs.

Their personalities and looks are as different as the roles they played and the men they loved and married. Although each won best-actress Oscars – Olivia for both To Each His Own and The Heiress and Joan for her role in Alfred Hitchcock’s Suspicion – Olivia will probably be best remembered for her legendary role as Melanie in Gone With the Wind and Joan for her brilliant portrayal of the heroine in Rebecca.

From Olivia’s romances with James Stewart and Howard Hughes and Joan’s with the late millionaire playboy Aly Khan, to their failed marriages – two for Olivia and four for Joan – to Olivia’s battle with Warner Brothers and Joan’s celebrated custody fight with William Dozier for their daughter Debbie, the tormented lives of these sister stars have seesawed between triumph and tragedy.

This shattering and poignant book goes far beyond a dual film biography and is replete with stories of the Hollywood luminaries who touched the sisters’ lives: Brian Aherne, Merle Oberon, John Huston, Bette Davis, to name a few. Higham not only traces the sisters’ deep-rooted rivalry from their childhood days in Japan, but reveals the extraordinary story of Martita, the seven-year-old Peruvian waif whom Joan adopted only to hand over to a guardian a few years later.

Sisters is surely the most fascinating biography yet written by this best-selling and noted film biographer.

CHARLES HIGHAM is the author of best-selling biographies of Katharine Hepburn, Marlene Dietrich, Errol Flynn, Bette Davis, and most recently, the widely acclaimed Princess Merle. He lives in Los Angeles.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 257 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 15,5 cm (9,3 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 575 g (20,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Coward-McCann, Inc., New York, New York, 1984 ISBN 0-698-11268-7

So Far, So Good: A Memoir (Burgess Meredith)

meredith-burgess-so-far-so-goodSo Far, So Good is the memoir of one of our century’s most accomplished actors and directors – a colorful, candid, witty tour through the world of American theater and film. Burgess Meredith’s remarkable career – including dozens of films, scores of plays, and distinguished directorial work both on Broadway and on the screen – speaks for itself: from his first early success on Broadway in Winterset, to his indelible performance as the Penguin in the Batman television series, to his portrayal of Sylvester Stallone’s feisty manager in Rocky, he has acted in some of this century’s most important movies and plays, and alongside some of its finest actors.

A deliciously entertaining storyteller, Burgess Meredith takes us inside his glittering world, to Tallulah Bankhead’s salacious midnight parties in her Gotham Hotel suite (she played hostess in the nude), to the behind-the-set antics with former wife Paulette Goddard (together they misplaced $ 300,000 worth of jewels), to the Communist witch-hunts in the 1950s (he was blacklisted). So Far, So Good is filled with marvelous anecdotes and revealing reminiscences about John Huston, Orson Welles, Jimmy Stewart, Katharine Cornell, Ingrid Bergman, John Steinbeck, Marlene Dietrich, Ian Fleming, Fred Astaire, Charles Chaplin, Aldous Huxley, Alexander Calder, Kurt Weill, Ginger Rogers, Jean Renoir, Lauren Bacall, Artie Shaw, David O. Selznick, Joseph Schenk, Charles Laughton, Franchot Tone, Andy Warhol. But Meredith’s memoir is also a touching story of humor, kindness, and triumph spanning over half a century in the spotlight. So Far, So Good is a delight from first page to last, perhaps Burgess Meredith’s best performance so far.

BURGESS MEREDITH lives in Malibu, California.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 278 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 571 g (20,1 oz) – PUBLISHER Little, Brown, and Company, Boston, Massachusetts, 1994 – ISBN 0-316-56717-5

Le soleil me trace la route (Sandrine Bonnaire; conversations avec Tiffy Morgue and Jean-Yves Gaillac)

bonnaire-sandrine-le-soleil-me-trace-la-routeDepuis vingt-sept ans on se parle… Ils m’ont connue très jeune et je les ai toujours connus à deux. Depuis vingt-sept ans je parle à la femme et l’homme qu’ils sont. Deux êtres complices.

Depuis ces longes conversations, ces beaux moments partagés, est née cette complicité à trois. Ils connaissaient les étapes de ma vie et les grands tournants. Ils connaissent l’actrice et la femme que je suis. Ils m’ont toujours suivi, regardée et écoutée avec bienveillance.

Alors voilà, ce livre je ne pouvais le faire qu’avec eux.

Ce livre raconte mon parcours, de la petite enfance à aujourd’hui. Il parle des gens que j’ai croisés et de ceux que j’ai aimés. J’ai envie de rendre hommage à certains d’entre eux. Ceux qui m’ont construite, accompagnée, et celui qui m’a mise sur cette route ensoleillée. – Sandrine Bonnaire

Softcover – 295 pp. – Dimensions 23,5 x 16 cm (9,3 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 586 g (20,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Éditions Stock, Paris, France, 2010 ISBN 978-2-234-06323-5

Some Day We’ll Laugh: An Autobiography (Esther Ralston)

ralston-esther-some-day-well-laugh“The Scarecrow Filmmakers series breaks new ground with this autobiography by Esther Ralston. One of the top contract players at Paramount in the Twenties, Esther Ralston brought considerable elegance and grace to such productions as Peter Pan, Beggar on Horseback, A Kiss for Cinderella, Old Ironsides, and The Case of Lena Smith. All of those films are discussed here, as is her childhood, when she worked on stage with her family, billed as “Baby Esther, America’s Youngest Juliet”; her first entry into films as an extra in the mid ‘teens; and her working relationship with such colorful characters as Dorothy Arzner, Herbert Brenon, Gary Cooper, and Josef von Sternberg.

Life was not quite as glamorous and as easy for this star as her fans might have surmised from the fanciful studio publicity, and Esther Ralston holds back nothing in discussing her marriages, her failures, and her eventual departure from the motion picture industry. It is a fascinating story – very much a part of the history of Twentieth-Century America – and is told with a warmth and a skill which demonstrates that the actress could easily have found employment as a writer (an area with which she has been increasingly involved in later years).

For those who might wonder what happened to Esther Ralston after the period covered by this autobiography, a brief résumé is in order. After some radio work – notably in the series, Portia Faces Life, We, the Abbotts and Woman of Courage – and some exposure on early television – the Kraft Theatre presentation of September Tide (1952), the ‘Tales of Tomorrow’ episode, All the Time in the World (1952), and the Broadway Television Theater production of The Noose (1953) – Esther Ralston did indeed become a saleswoman, at the Manhasset, Long Island store of B. Altman’s. Initially, she was lured back to television by NBC producer Eugene Barr for an episode of The Verdict of Yours. Barr subsequently hired Esther to portray Helen Lee on the 1962 soap opera, Our Five Daughters. After working as a lighting consultant for the Glen Falls (New York) Electric Supply Company, Esther Ralston returned to California in 1978, and has been active as an actress in countless television commercials.

How does one summarize a career and a personality such as Esther Ralston’s? Eugene Barr described her as “the most beautiful thing that God ever created.” One of her Paramount features, The American Venus, provided her with a sobriquet that she has rightly carried with her to the present. Suffice it to say that Esther Ralston was and is an actress who struggled for success and succeeded. Her films are as enduring in their greatness as is her talent.” – From the Editor’s Note by Anthony Slide.

One of Paramount’s major female stars of the Twenties, ESTHER RALSTON is remembered for her work in Peter Pan (1924), Beggar on Horseback (1925), The American Venus (1926), A Kiss for Cinderella (1926), Old Ironsides (1926), Fashions for Women (1927), and The Case of Lena Smith (1929). Her directors included Josef von Sternberg and Dorothy Arzner, and she was a leading lady to Richard Dix, Charles Farrell, Gary Cooper, and Richard Arlen.

Hardcover – 201 pp., index – Dimensions 22 x 14 cm (8,7 x 5,5 inch) – Weight 440 g (15,5 oz) – PUBLISHER The Scarecrow Press, Inc., Metuchen, New Jersey, 1985 – ISBN 0-8108-1814-0

Some Like It Hot: The Official 50th Anniversary Companion (Laurence Maslon; foreword by Walter Mirisch)

Maslon, Laurence - Some Like It HotSelected as America’s Funniest Movie by the American Film Institute, Some Like It Hot remains an undisputed classic fifty years on, as it continues to capture three of American culture’s great preoccupations – jazz, gangsters, and Marilyn Monroe. The Official 50th Anniversary Companion details the history of this side-splitting farce from its roots as an obscure 1951 German film to its Hollywood conception, where Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond transposed the material to the Roaring Twenties and director Wilder cast the brilliant Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon in the starring roles.

As well as previously unpublished images, posters and documents from the MGM archives, this book includes selections from the screenplay, casting notes, on-set production anecdotes and location shots from the fabled Del Coronado in San Diego (doubling for Florida). In addition, songs and music used in the film’s jazz era setting, background information on Chicago during the Prohibition, the story of the Broadway and West End musical versions (one of which starred Tony Curtis), the previously undiscovered television pilot based on the movie and the ongoing legacy of the most famouys drag comedy in film history!

Featuring cameo appearances by Arthur Miller, Edward G. Robinson, Al Capone, Tommy Steele, Robert Morse, Tina Louise and Tom Hanks, The Official 50th Anniversary Companion is the first book to tell the full story of Some Like It Hot from start to finish, from wig to high heels.

‘Nobody’s Perfect,’ as the saying goes, but Some Like It Hot: The Official 50th Anniversary Companion really is the ultimate guide for everyone who loves this comedy classic.

LAURENCE MASLON is an associate arts professor at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. He is the author of The Sound of Music Companion and The South Pacific Companion, and, with Michael Kantor, wrote the documentary series Broadway: The American Musical and Make ‘Em Laugh and their companion volumes. He lives in New York with his wife, Genevieve, their son, Miles, and their dog, Ruby.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 192 pp. – Dimensions 31 x 24,5 cm (12,2 x 9,7 inch) – Weight 1.590 g (56,1 oz) – PUBLISHER Pavilion Books, London, 2009 – ISBN 978-1-86205-864-4

Some of Me (Isabella Rossellini)

Rossellini, Isabella - Some of MeA fascinating, quirky, and above all personal look at herself and her life by the renowned model / actress, who illuminates her life and her world in a brilliant mosaic of short takes accompanied by scores of pictures ranging from those she keeps on her bedside table to family snapshots and her many Richard Avedon Vogue covers.

She writes of her mother, Ingrid Bergman: “Second to acting, Mother loved cleaning, which is not to say she loved even that above me. I’m sure she loved me more than cleaning, but what made her happiest was combining the two.”

She writes of her father, Roberto Rossellini: “My father was a Jewish mother… When we were children (there were seven of us), one of our favorite games was throwing ourselves onto Daddy’s body. Lying on his side, he pretended to be the sow and we were the piglets.”

She writes about her famous nude scene in David Lynch’s Blue Velvet and of posing for Avedon, Bruce Weber, and Steven Meisel. About being fired as the face of Lancôme because she dared to turn forty. About the two years of scoliosis that blighted her adolescence. About acting as opposed to modeling. About being a daughter, a sister, and a mother. About her children: Elettra, who, when asked by her kindergarten teacher what she would do if she got lost in an airport, answered, “I’d look for my mamma’s poster and wait underneath it for help”; and Roberto, her adopted son. About her unforgettable encounters with Anna Magnani (her father’s onetime mistress) and Katharine Hepburn, as well as the peculiar behavior of her many pets. About her wardrobe. About lying. She talks – candidly yet discreetly – about the men in her life: her ex-husband Martin Scorsese, David Lynch, Gary Oldman. And she conducts intimate and extended dialogues with her beloved dead ones. In other words, Some of Me is utterly original, provocative, and enchanting – and, of course, given the many pictures, a thing of beauty. Like the author herself.

ISABELLA ROSSELLINI grew up in Paris and Rome. She moved to New York at the age of nineteen and began a modeling career at twenty-eight. Her American film debut came in 1985 with White Nights. Her other films include Blue Velvet, Cousins, Wild at Heart, Fearless, Immortal Beloved, The Funeral, and Big Night. She has also appeared on television – most recently in Crime of the Century for HBO and on the CBS series Chicago Hope. After being the exclusive model for Lancôme for fourteen years, she accepted a  vice-presidency with the Lancaster Group in 1995 in order to develop a new line of makeup, skin-care products, and fragrance. She lives in New York City with her two children.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 179 pp. – Dimensions 23,5 x 21 cm (9,3 x 8,3 inch) – Weight 786 g (27,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Random House, New York, New York, 1997 – ISBN 0-679-45252-4

Some Time in the Sun: The Hollywood Years of Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Nathanael West, Aldous Huxley, and James Agee (Tom Dardis)

Dardis, Tom - Some Time in the SunThe Big Sleep, Jane Eyre, The African Queen, To Have and Have Not, Pride and Prejudice. They’re all movie classics, of course, but something else gives them distinction. The screenplays of these films were written by some of the greatest names in modern literature, men who spent considerable periods of their lives working under contract for the major film studios.

For the first time, Tom Dardis tells the full story of what brought Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, Nathanael West, Aldous Huxley, and James Agee to Hollywood – and what kept bringing them back year after year. Everyone knows the old saw about the serious artist selling his soul in a sun-drenched cultural desert, but Dardis goes beyond cliché to show what the movies learned from some great literary talents – and what they in turn learned from the movies. There are surprises here, for the Fitzgerald of this book is quite unlike the smashed and defeated Fitzgerald so often depicted.

The book is a treasure trove of material never been published, the result of extensive interviews with co-workers and writers. There are also excerpts from the actual shooting scripts of many famous movies.

Some Time in the Sun will delight everyone intertested in films and in modern literature – and every television viewer who has ever been jolted out of late-night lethargy by a strikingly familiar name.

TOM DARDIS was educated at New York University and Columbia University. He has been editor in chief of a paperback publishing house and an adjunct professor at Adelphi University. His stories have appeared in Vox Vet, Shenandoah, and American Vanguard. About his life at the movies he says, “I started paying attention to screen credits when I saw thousands of films while working as a theater usher during my high school years. It all started then and hasn’t stopped yet.”

Hardcover, dust jacket – 274 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 15,5 cm (9,3 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 627 g (22,1 oz) – PUBLISHER Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, New York, 1976 – ISBN 0-684-14563-4

Sophia: Een Intieme Biografie (Donald Zec; originally titled Sophia: An Intimate Biography)

Zec, Donald - Sophia“Het heeft geen zin er omheen te draaien. Sophia Loren is een buitengewone vrouw die toevallig actrice is. Dit is gemakkelijk gezegd, maar moeilijker om uit te leggen, tenzij je de diamant klooft om bij de bron van de schittering te komen. Ze is niet wat ze schijnt te zijn, en om haar binnenste te balsemen zou het povere omhulsel ‘superstar’ lijken op het toebrengen van lichamelijk letsel.

Zelfs de allerberoemdste filmsterren hebben de neiging gehad overmatig vergrote versies van zichzelf te zijn, en zij die onvoorzichtig najagen wat Hollywood dwaas genoeg ‘charisma’ noemt, eindigen doorgaans als het totaal van hun banaliteiten. (…) Sophia Loren staat op enige afstand van deze marionetten. Ze trotseert iedere vergelijking, onaantastbaar en verrukkelijk. Evenals Marilyn Monroe is alleen al haar voornaam in vijf continenten een begrip. (…) Schilders, fotografen en filmregisseurs hebben zich geërgerd aan haar uiterlijke tekortkomingen – korte kin, te brede mond, de neus en de hals niet helemaal in overeenstemming met het geheel. Maar van zodra dat geheel zinnenstrelend in beweging komt, herzien genoemde experts hun oordeel haastig.” – From The Introduction.

Softcover – 224 pp., index – Dimensions 21 x 13 cm (8,3 x 5,1 inch) – Weight 355 g (12,5 oz) – PUBLISHER In den Toren, Baarn, The Netherlands, 1975 – ISBN 90 6074 068 8

Sophia Loren: A Biography (Warren G. Harris)

Harris, Warren G - Sophia LorenBorn out of wedlock in fascist Italy, Sofia Scicolone seemed destined for a life of shame, poverty, and suffering. That she survived the bombings, food shortages, and epidemics of World War II was a miracle in itself. But she went on to astound the world as Sophia Loren, one of the most beautiful and talented superstars of this century. She costarred with Cary Grant and Frank Sinatra in her very first international film, and went on to work opposite many of their peers, including Clark Gable, John Wayne, Alan Ladd, William Holden, Marlon Brando, Gregory Peck, Charlton Heston, Paul Newman, David Niven, Peter O’Toole, Anthony Quinn, Peter Finch, Omar Sharif, and Richard Burton.

Sophia Loren reveals the truth behind the legend who was once described as Italy’s most perfect – and enigmatic – work of art since the Mona Lisa. The story of her rise from homely and skinny toothpick to awesome love goddess begins with Sophia’s frustrated mother, a Greta Garbo lookalike who transferred her own dreams of stardom to her daughter. Following a chance meeting with producer Carlo Ponti, Sophia became his “protegee,” acting in some of his films and becoming the married Ponti’s mistress.

Sophia and Ponti have been together ever since. For nearly two decades they were treated like criminals in Italy, where, until 1970, citizens were denied the right to divorce without approval from the Vatican. Facing criminal prosecution, Sophia and Ponti became exiles. The story of how they were eventually able to return to Italy, only to be later prosecuted for alleged tax evasion, is just part of author Warren G. Harris’s intimate portrait of one of the celebrity world’s most remarkable – and secretive – marriages. Also covered in depth are Sophia’s remarkable personal relationships with Cary Grant, Peter Sellers, Richard Burton, and others who fell under her spell.

The Pontis are one of the wealthiest couples in Europe. Their magnificent villa near Rome once contained a collection of paintings and antiques worth hundreds of millions of dollars. Though Ponti produced the majority of Sophia’s films, their fortune was built largely from two movies he made without her – the world-wide blockbusters Doctor Zhivago and Blow-Up.

Most of Sophia’s films for Hollywood were box-office duds. But under master director Vittorio De Sica, Sophia won an Oscar as Best Actress of 1961 for Two Women, the only time in the history of the Academy Awards that a non-English-speaking performance was so honored. De Sica costarred Sophia with Marcello Mastroianni in two comedies that quickly established them as one of the screen’s supreme acting teams.

But Sophia wanted nothing more than to be a mother, and she eventually gave birth to two sons, Carlo in 1968 and Edoardo in 1973, after a heart-breaking series of miscarriages. She then branched into commerce and earned millions with her “Sophia” perfume and a line of eyeglass frames that she designed. With Sophia now in her sixties, her luminous qualities remain undimmed and her infrequent screen appearances are still a joy to watch.

WARREN G. HARRIS has written seven celebrity biographies, including his most recent Audrey Hepburn, and dual biographies of Clark Gable and Carole Lombard, Natalie Wood and Robert Wagner, and Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz. He lives in New York City.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 399 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 705 g (24,9 oz) – PUBLISHER Simon & Schuster, New York, New York, 1998 – ISBN 0-684-80273-2

Sophia Loren In the Camera Eye (photography and commentary by Sam Shaw)

Shaw, Sam - Sophia LorenConceived in homage to Sophia Loren by Sam Shaw, a friend of hers since her days as a budding star, this book features 175 of the best photographs of Sophia at upbeat moments in her career.

The talent and beauty of Sophia Loren continue to amaze. Counting her debut in Quo Vadis in 1951, at age 17, she has appeared in more than 40 films: all the while, her acting has grown in emotional range and depth; her beauty has become more radiant with maturity. Time has also enriched her personality. By instinct high-spirited, fun-loving, maternally protective, Loren is today a superbly confident woman with an inquiring mind, a droll sense of humor, and a sophisticated attitude toward her art and life.

Sophia Loren: In the Camera Eye includes over 100 Shaw photographs alone – many of them never before published: shots of Sophia posing and clowning at home; candids with her family and her husband, movie tycoon Carlo Ponti; revealing pictures of Sophia working with the great Italian director Vittorio de Sica. and with such co-stars as Cary Grant and Marcello Mastroianni.

Shaw’s impressions and anecdotes, accompanying his photographs, create a unique portrait of this amazing woman. A thorough biography and a complete filmography, illustrated by movie stills and informal press photographs, are appended to Shaw’s tribute.

SAM SHAW, one of the world’s great photographers, was raised in New York’s “Little Italy.” He studied art, worked at first as a courtroom artist then as sports and political cartoonist for The Brooklyn Eagle. He took up photojournalism after he became an art director for pictorial magazines. As an independent, Shaw gained recognition as the first of the “special” photographers – photo journalists on assignment both from major film studios and from major weeklies. He has photographed many of the best directors at work and practically every international film star. He also initiated photo-coverage of films by magazines, when Argosy hired him to do a story on Panic in the Streets. In addition to innovative photo-reportage of films and stars, Shaw has experimented with film advertisement since the 1950’s (receiving international awards for his ads for A Woman Under the Influence); has co-produced and produced films (beginning with Paris Blues); and has created storyboard (drawings and photographs of scenes prior to the shooting of takes), for films by such noted directors as John Cassavetes for whom he serves as executive producer. Shaw’s photo-essays have appeared in Life, Look, Paris Match, Europeo, The Daily Mail, Der Stern, Harper’s Bazaar, Connaissance des Arts.. His photographs have been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and at the Venice Biennial. But he is best known for his perceptive portraits of international film stars on set and off, for the candor and penetration of his work, which show the real people behind the celluloid images.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 160 pp. – Dimensions 28 x 22 cm (11 x 8,7 inch) – Weight 700 g (24,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Exeter Books, New York, New York, 1979 – ISBN 0-89673-029-8

Southern Daughter: The Life of Margaret Mitchell (Darden Asbury Pyron)

Pyron, Darden Asbury - Southern DaughterGone With the Wind is an American phenomenon. Arguably the most popular American novel of all time, it sold over a million copies in its first six months (in the heart of the Depression), won a Pulitzer Prize for its author, and more remarkable still, returned to the New York Times Best Seller list fifty years after its first appearance. Crowning its glory, David O. Selznick transformed the novel into one of the great films of all time, lifting its characters – especially the unforgettable Scarlett O’Hara and her lover – antagonist Rhett Butler – to the pinnacle of American popular culture.

Now, in Southern Daughter, Darden Pyron provides an absorbing biography of Margaret Mitchell, the author of this American classic. In a solidly researched, sprightly narrative informed by a deep knowledge of Southern culture, Pyron reveals a woman of unconventional beauty, born into one of Atlanta’s most prominent families, and imbued from childhood with tales of the Civil War. Mitchell was a rebellious child, an independent woman who wanted a career and not a family (children made her wince), and a Catholic who defiantly left the Church, divorced her first husband, Red Upshaw (a ne’er-do-well and sometime bootlegger), and married John Marsh (who had been Upshaw’s best man). Fans of Gone With the Wind will find several chapters in Southern Daughter that trace how these elements in Mitchell’s biography made their way into her fiction, including the most surprising identity for the fictional Rhett Butler. As a further surprise to most Americans who know only the film version of Gone With the Wind, Pyron reveals how Mitchell intended her book as a repudiation of the then popular “moonlight on the magnolias” genre of Civil War romance. Equally interesting is his portrait of Mitchell after the novel’s success: the incredible flood of letters (in the 13 years before her death, Mitchell wrote at least ten thousand letters, an astonishing number of which ran pages and pages); the filming of Gone With the Wind, whose script ultimately required seventeen writers, including F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ben Hecht; and the lavish film premiere in Atlanta.

Whether describing Mitchell’s earliest writing (such as The Cow Puncher and Phil Kelley, Detective, in which she played Zara the female crook), or discussing her final years, which were marred by constant pain and illness, wrangles with agents and publisher, and her increasing affection for litigation, this perceptive, sympathetic, and engagingly written biography illuminates the life of a major writer and the book she created, a work peopled with characters who still loom large in the American imagination.

DARDEN ASBURY PYRON is Professor of History at Florida International University.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 533 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 1.045 g (36,9 oz) – PUBLISHER Oxford University, New York, New York, 1991 – ISBN 0-19-505276-5

Les souvenirs et les regrets aussi… (Catherine Allégret)

scannen0043‘Je dois avoir quatre ans. Je suis seule avec ma mère [Simone Signoret] dans le salon, nous attendons Yves Montand qui doit rentrer de voyage. Brusquement, j’entends la porte d’entrée qui se referme. Je me cache derrière un fauteuil. Montand entre. Il tient quelque chose derrière son dos. Est-ce un cadeau pour moi ? Je me prépare à sortir de ma cachette pour lui faire la surprise de ma présence, mais je n’en ai pas le temps. Déjà, il enlace ma mère. Ils  s’embrassent. Et ce baiser dure … dure tant, qu’il dure encore dans ma mémoire aujourd’hui. Et moi, je n’ose plus sortir, j’ai peur de déranger. Je crois bien que, ma vie durant, je me suis sentie prisonnière derrière ce fauteuil, avec, plantée au creux du ventre, cette peur de déranger quelque chose ou quelqu’un.” – Catherine Allégret

CATHERINE ALLÉGRET est née le 16 avril 1946 à Paris. Comédienne, elle a débuté au cinéma dans Compartiment tueurs de Costa Gavras. Auteur pour le théâtre, le café-théâtre, la télévision, elle signe avec Les Souvenirs et les regrets aussi … son premier livre.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 427 pp. – Dimensions 24,5 x 16 cm (9,7 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 598 g (21,1 oz) – PUBLISHER France Loisirs, Paris, 1994 – ISBN 2-7242-8175-6

Sparks Fly Upward (Stewart Granger)

granger-stewart-sparks-fly-upward“I was born on 6 May 1913 in a flat in the Old Brompton Road, London, and christened James Lablache in the little church in The Boltons: James after my father, the eighth eldest son in a direct line, all of whom had been christened James, and Lablache after my mother’s great-grandfather Luigi Lablache, the world-famous basso profondo.

My father, Major James Stewart, RE, OBE, was a Scot, the eldest of thirteen, seven boys and six girls. All the boys were big, their average height being six foot one, but my grandmother was tiny and my father used to tell me how, when she was really angry, he and his brothers would lift her on to the enormous drawing-room mantelpiece and keep her there until she’d promised they wouldn’t be punished. He always spoke of his family with great love. He was an army man in a long line of army men, a great athlete, as all the silver cups on the Welsh dresser in the dining-room testified, and seemed to have won every trophy for track events at Cheltenham College. He passed first out of Woolwich (no mean feat back in the 1880s), showing he had great academic brilliance, something I didn’t inherit. He was fifty-five when I was born, a confirmed bachelor until he met my mother and just lost his head over her. He had spent most of his youth in the Indian Army and was a typical product; everything by the book. If it wasn’t, he was rather lost and I, apparently, was not ‘by the book.’ He always seemed to be rather shocked at what he’d sired. He was a very gentle man, and I never saw him lose his temper or swear. I wish he had. I wanted to love him but I was never able to get close to him. He was a sort of ghost in our home; he was there, but he never asserted himself. Like all young children I could sense when something wasn’t normal and there was certainly something not normal in his relationship with my mother.

To start with, the sleeping arrangements were so odd. I was in one room with my nanny, my sister Iris and my mother in another, and my father had a small monkish bedroom to himself. I never saw him cuddle my mother, or kiss her, except on the cheek when he said goodnight, and I noticed how she always turned her head away. Of course, I never saw them in bed together.

My mother was a famous beauty. Her father was an actor and her mother, Jane Emmerson, had been a member of Henry Irving’s company. When she told Irving she was going to marry my grandfather, he replied, ‘If you marry that bloody foreigner, you’ll never work for me again.’ Well, she did and she didn’t. Mother fell in love very young with an Honourable Fitz – Herbert or William, I can never remember which. They eloped when she was eighteen and lived much of the time in Monte Carlo where they were very social, going to parties every night, although my mother knew that her husband was very ill. She would beg him to rest but he wouldn’t listen and a year later he died in her arms of tuberculosis, so poor Mummy had to come crawling back to my grandmother who was an absolute bitch and made her life hell. So here was my beautiful mother, dying to get away from home and here was my poor bachelor father. They met and that was it. After a brief courtship they married. My father was the happiest man in the world and my mother was able to leave home.” – From chapter 1.

Softcover – 416 pp., index – Dimensions 17,5 x 11 cm (6,9 x 4,3 inch) – Weight 257 g (9,1 oz) – PUBLISHER Granada Publishing Ltd., London, 1981 – ISBN 0-586-05599-1

A Spectacle of Dust: The Autobiography (Pete Postlethwaite)

scannen0275Pete Postlethwaite was a well-known face on stage, cinema and television for over twenty years. His real success began when he appeared in the  much-admired 1988 film Distant Voices, Still Lives. He went on to act in a number of Hollywood blockbusters including a leading role in The Lost World: Jurassic Park, and, more recently, Inception. Closer to home, Postlethwaite was greatly admired by British audiences, acting in some of the best dramas such as In the Name of the Father and Brassed Off.

Candid and vibrant, this autobiography – completed shortly before he died – recounts the life of a much-loved and remarkably talented man.

PETE POSTLETHWAITE was born in Warrington in 1946. He trained at the Bristol Old Vic, beginning a distinguished career on stage and screen. He was made an OBE in the 2004 New Year’s Honors List. He died in January, 2011, aged sixty-four.

Hardcover – 296 pp. – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 634 g (22,4 oz) – PUBLISHER Windsor Aragon / Weidenfeld & Nicolson, London, 2011 – ISBN 978 1 445 88646 6

Speedbumps: Flooring It Through Hollywood (Teri Garr, with Henriette Mantel)

garr-teri-speedbumpsIn her laugh-out-loud funny and inspiring autobiography, Teri Garr, one of Hollywood’s best-loved comediennes, muses about movies, men, motherhood, and MS.

From the directors she’s worked with and admired to the men she’s loved, from sipping Cokes with Elvis Presley on Good Friday to hangin’ with the Beatles. from her secrets to succeeding in Hollywood without losing her sanity, to dealing with the fear, anxiety, and denial of being plagued by mysterious physical problems that eluded diagnosis for over twenty years – the insights in Speedbumps, while always couched in Garr’s trademark humor, are honest, heartfelt, and often profound.

Since she was eight years old, little Terry Ann Garr was a natural performer, staging elaborate productions for the neighborhood in her family’s garage, captivating her teachers and easing the tensions between her alcoholic, gambling vaudevillian father and her hard-working Rockette mother with her natural charm and wit. By the age of thirteen – two years after her father’s premature death catalyzed her to “get serious” about becoming a dancer – she was touring with a San Francisco ballet company; at seventeen, she was swiveling her hips alongside Elvis and Ann-Margret in Viva Las Vegas.

By the time she was thirty, Teri had become known as one of Hollywood’s best-loved comic actresses, starring in such classic films as Young Frankenstein; Oh, God!; Close Encounters of the Third Kind; and Mr. Mom; and receiving an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress for her performance alongside Dustin Hoffman in Tootsie.

In October 2002, Teri announced on national television that she had multiple sclerosis, making headlines across the country. Since then, she has become a leading advocate in raising awareness for MS and the latest treatments for the disease, traveling around the United States speaking to corporations, physicians, and patients about her experience.

Now, in a book that is at once Hollywood hilarious and personally moving, Teri writes about her life – speedbumps and all – with the same characteristic wit and warmth that have won the hearts of fans and Hollywood for more than three decades.

When TERI GARR is not acting or on the road, she resides in Los Angeles with her daughter, Molly; a dog; two cats, and seventeen goldfish. HENRIETTE MANTEL is a comedienne; an Emmy Award-winning writer; and an actress of stage, screen, and television. She grew up in Vermont way before it was a popular place to live and now resides in Los Angeles.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 244 pp. – Dimensions 23,5 x 15,5 cm (9,3 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 552 g (19,5 oz) – PUBLISHER Hudson Street Press, New York, New York, 2005 – ISBN 1-59463-007-0

The Speed of Sound: Hollywood and the Talkie Revolution 1926-1930 (Scott Eyman)

eyman-scott-the-speed-of-soundAlthough film and movies had existed for some time years prior, it was D.W. Griffith’s The Birth of a Nation, released in 1915, that turned what had been a flickering novelty into transformational art form. In years following that first epic film, that art form had been refined and reinterpreted many times and in many ways, and such masters of the silent as F.W. Murnau, King Vidor, and Erich von Stroheim had emerged to create movies that were visual art.

And then, in 1926, came sound and, with it – at least in the eyes of many – came the end of art. Certainly it marked the end of moviemaking as its first creators had known it. The careers and those of many others who had been celebrated during Hollywood’s silent era were over. It was a turbulent, colorful, and altogether remarkable period – four years in which America’s most popular industry reinvented itself.

For the first time ever, here is the epic story of the transition from silent films to talkies – that moment when movies were totally transformed and the American public cemented its love affair with Hollywood. In The Speed of Sound, author Scott Eyman, whose biography of Ernst Lubitsch was hailed as “resoundingly wonderful,” has created a mixture of cultural and social history that is at once both scholarly and vastly entertaining. Here is the first and last word on the missing chapter in the history of Hollywood, the ribbon of dreams by which America conquered the world.

Myth has it that it happened overnight, that Al Jolson said a few words in The Jazz Singer and the talkies were born, that stars with weak and inappropriate voices either killed themselves or went into seclusion, that the movie industry simply refitted itself and went on with business. The truth, however, is more involved – not to mention sinister, colorful, and entertaining.

Sound was something the industry had resisted, and it was accepted only reluctantly after the Warner Bros. studio had forced the issue with its aggressive selling of The Jazz Singer. But that was 1927, and for a long time afterward there were still those filmmakers, film stars, and even some filmgoers who resisted the appealing novelty. Change, however, was inevitable, and when it came it was devastating. As Scott Eyman demonstrates in his fascinating account of this exciting era, it was a time when fortunes, careers, and lives were made and lost, when the American film industry came fully into its own, and when the American film-going public truly succumbed to Hollywood’s bewitching spell.

SCOTT EYMAN is the Books Editor for The Palm Beach Post. He is the author of Ernst Lubitsch: Laughter in Paradise and Mary Pickford: America’s Sweetheart, among other books, and is currently at work on a major biography of John Ford. Eyman lives in West Palm Beach, Florida, with his wife.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 413 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 758 g (26,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Simon & Schuster, New York, New York, 1997 – ISBN 0-684-81162-6

Spiegel: The Man Behind the Pictures (Andrew Sinclair)

Sinclair, Andrew - SpiegelThis is the life story of the outstanding producer who made four of the greatest films of all time: On the Waterfront, The African Queen, The Bridge on the River Kwai, and Lawrence of Arabia. Sam Spiegel oversaw every aspect of his productions and was a central force in the European and American film from the 1920s until his death in 1985.

His private life, crowded with women and dominated by gambling, offers stark contrast to his publuc life, in which, with Spiegel as the catalyst, such figures as Greta Garbo, Harold Pinter, Elizabeth Taylor, and Marlon Brando met and socialized with the British Royal family, the Kennedys, and the Rainiers. Spiegel became an international celebrity to rival Onassis as he and various illustrious companions cruised the world on his yacht.

Spiegel’s early days were spent as an illegal immigrant, passing bad checks and fighting for acceptance. But as Budd Schulberg later observed of Spiegel’s film career, “If anyone knew how to ride out a loser, it was S.P. Eagle.” Searching interviews with friends, foes, and colleagues, and his own personal knowledge of Spiegel, have enabled Andrew Sinclair to create this exceptionally powerful portrait.

ANDREW SINCLAIR was born in Oxford, England, in 1935 and was educated at Eton, Harvard, and Cambridge, where he took his Ph.D. in American history and became a don. He is the author of many successful works of nonfiction and novels, including the celebrated Breaking of Bumbo and My Friend Judas, biographies of John Ford and Jack London, and, most recently, The Red and the Blue: Cambridge, Treason and Intelligence. He is also a publisher and has made films, including the highly acclaimed film version of Under Milk Wood.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 162 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 15,5 cm (9,5 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 432 g (15,2 oz) – PUBLISHER Little, Brown and Company, Boston, Massachusetts, 1987 – ISBN 0316-79236-5

Split Image: The Life of Anthony Perkins (Charles Winecoff)

winecoff-charles-split-image-the-life-of-anthony-perkinsIn 1960, Anthony Perkins’s portrayal of Norman Bates, the soft-spoken killer in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho, shattered the expectations of an unprepared public by suggesting that the all-American boy next door could in fact harbor secret demons of shocking violence and perversity. Overnight, Perkins’s performance became a landmark of motion picture horror, catapulting him into the realm of icon, while at the same time irreversibly toppling his career as a romantic leading man.

As Charles Winecoff reveals in this intimate biography, Anthony Perkins’s offscreen life was equally as fractured. The son of legendary stage actor Osgood Perkins, who died suddenly when Anthony was five, Perkins grew up in the shadow of his famous father’s memory, a circumstance that fueled his own theatrical ambition. His early Broadway success as the sexually confused schoolboy in Tea and Sympathy caught the attention of film director William Wyler, who promptly cast Perkins opposite Gary Cooper in Friendly Persuasion, winning him an Oscar nomination. But under contract to Paramount, Anthony Perkins was merely hyped as a replacement for the late James Dean.

Like Dean, though, Perkins was the victim of the notorious Hollywood closet, forced to act the part of a ladies’ man while privately struggling with his own homosexuality. When his affair with a fellow matinee idol threatened to become public, Tony Perkins just learned how thoroughly his life was Hollywood’s to control.

Years of research and interviews with more than 300 of Perkins’s friends, co-stars, relatives, and lovers have enabled Charles Winecoff to uncover for the first time the many twists and turns of Perkins’s astonishing, sometimes harrowing double life in New York, Hollywood, and Europe. Examined here are Perkins’s near-obsessive reliance on psychoanalysis, his unexpected marriage at age forty-one to socialite Berry Berenson (the sister of supermodel Marisa), and his fierce determination to create a new image for himself as a family man – an image that was ultimately destroyed by his death from AIDS in 1992.

Full of anecdotes about such luminaries as Orson Welles, Audrey Hepburn, George Cukor, and Sophia Loren, and written with rare candor and compassion, this compelling biography illuminates the dark side of Broadway and Hollywood as it traces the poignant personal odyssey of one man who was forever struggling to find himself under the spotlight’s glare. Split Image is an irresistible human drama and a classic of movie history.

CHARLES WINECOFFE, a graduate of the UCLA film school, lives in New York City.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 482 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 15,5 cm (9,3 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 860 g (30,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Dutton, New York, New York, 1996 – ISBN 0-525-94064-2

Sports in the Movies (Ronald Bergan)

bergan-ronald-sports-in-the-movies“Sports have always been part of the American entertainment industry and their presentation is very much allied to the razzle-dazzle of show business, so it is not strange that the movies are drawn to sports as easily as Esther Williams to water. Film, more than any other art form, has used sports as its subject matter because of their visual and dramatic properties as well as their popularism. Sports create myths and heroes, the very life-force of Hollywood. These myths and heroes, unlike those of the western, are contemporary and relevant to most people’s experience.

Both sports and the movies are the supreme escapist entertainments, appealing generally to the same group of people. For millions of youngsters, Saturday afternoons mean watching or playing a game, and Saturday nights mean the movies. No wonder the nostalgic charm of sports and the movies is so strong. Sports represent childhood, youth, prowess and power; and the middle-aged spectator recaptures lost time as he sits on the stands remembering the days when his body did almost everything he wanted it to do. There is no other occupation where the gap between desire and performance is so noticeable as people age. Men pride themselves on the continuation of sexual activity into old age and even boast of it, but, on the whole, sex is a private affair behind closed doors. Sports, on the other hand, are practiced in public places with people looking on. If a man wants to prove he is still youthful, this is the area in which to do it. The active life of a pro-sportsman (excluding those in less strenuous sports such as golf, bowling, etc.) is in human terms parallel to the life of a butterfly. No sooner is man out of the cocoon of childhood, than he is fluttering awkwardly into middle-age. This tragi-comic situation has been allayed in the movies where anything is possible in the Never-Never-land of Hollywood. The outsider, the long shot, the weakling, the underdog all have their day and ageing Peter Pans continue in athletic postures. The poignancy is not always ignored and films such as The Set-Up (RKO, 1949), The Swimmer (Col., 1968), Number One (UA, 1969), Fat City (Col., 1972) and Big Wednesday (WB, 1978) have all shown the insidious creeping up of age. In two classic American plays, Death of a Salesman and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, college football symbolises the unfulfilled hopes of youth.” – From The Introduction.

Softcover – 160 pp., index – Dimensions 27 x 19,5 cm (10,6 x 7,7 inch) – Weight 511 g (18 oz) – PUBLISHER Proteus Publishing, Ltd., London, 1982 – ISBN 0 86276 017 8

Stanley Kramer: Filmmaker (Donald Spoto)

Spoto, Donald - Stanley Kramer FilmmakerThis is the definitive study of Stanley Kramer’s work. Stanley Kramer’s Hollywood career spanned five decades, and the rich and challenging quality of his work places him among America’s most preeminent filmmakers. The films he produced and directed are set apart from the standard Hollywood fare by his personal stamp – a strong social conscience, a search for values, and a willingness to take risks.

Among the films that Stanley Kramer produced are Champion, High Noon, Death of a Salesman, The Wild One, and The Caine Mutiny. Among the films that Stanley Kramer both produced and directed are The Defiant Ones, On the Beach, Inherit the Wind, Judgement at Nuremberg, Ship of Fools, and Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner.

Through insightful analysis, thorough research into each film’s backstory, and a good measure of Kramer’s own thoughts and comments, biographer Donald Spoto discusses each of Stanley Kramer’s many films.

DONALD SPOTO is an American biographer and theologian. He has written two dozen best-selling biographies of film and theater stars – among them Stanley Kramer. He also taught theology, Christian mysticism, and biblical literature at the university level for twenty years. Born in Westchester County, near New York City, he now lives in Denmark.

Softcover – 367 pp., index – Dimensions 23 x 15,5 cm (9,1 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 601 g (21,2 oz) – PUBLISHER Samuel French Trade, Hollywood, California, 1978 – ISBN 0-573-60609-9

Stanley Kubrick: Een compleet overzicht van al zijn films (Paul Duncan)

duncan-paul-stanley-kubrick“Stanley Kubrick realiseerde zich al vroeg in zijn leven dat ‘mensen in staat zijn tot het puur goede en het ultieme slechte, en het is een probleem dat we er vaak geen onderscheid tussen kunnen maken als het ons zo uitkomt.’ Dit was een thema dat terugkeerde in al zijn films, goed en kwaad, liefde en haat, seks en geweld, lust en angst, trouw en ontrouw: de hoofdpersonen in zijn films worstelden met deze krachten in zichzelf, en de omstandigheden waarin ze zich bevinden (een oorlog, een affaire, een misdaad) zorgen ervoor dat die worsteling voor het publiek zichtbaar wordt.

Kubrick herhaalde dit idee toen hij sprak over zijn horrorfilm The Shining: ”Er is iets fundamenteel mis met de menselijke persoonlijkheid. Er zit een duistere kant aan. Griezelverhalen kunnen ons de archetypen van ons onbewuste laten zien, zodat we de duistere kant zien zonder er rechtstreeks mee geconfronteerd te worden.’ In zijn biografie van Kubrick schrijft John Baxter dat deze houding tegenover het verhaal en de personages in elke film van Kubrick te zien is; het is een manicheïstische kijk op de wereld die zegt dat de wereld niet door God is geschapen, maar door de machtsstrijd tussen goed en kwaad. Zo komen de ‘goede’ soldaten in Kubricks eerste film, Fear and Desire, in vijandelijk gebied terecht en doden de ‘slechte’ soldaten, die gespeeld worden door dezelfde acteurs. Alex mag in A Clockwork Orange dan wel een wrede jongen zijn die gek is op seks en geweld, hij houdt ook van de negende symfonie van Beethoven. Aan het eind van het verhaal keren Alex’ onbedwingbare lusten terug, net als zijn liefde voor de negende symfonie. De plot van Full Metal Jacket lijkt in veel opzichten op Fear and Desire en kan gezien worden als de zoektocht van Joker naar zijn duistere kant: hij is een gevoelige schrijver en een intellectueel, maar op een bepaald moment moet hij het beest in zich zoeken en loslaten. Zoals in Vietnam werd gezegd: ‘Ik loop door een dal van schaduwen dood, maar ik vrees het kwade niet omdat ik het kwade ben.’ Kubrick liet deze tegenstelling zien op de poster van Full Metal Jacket, waarop de helm van een soldaat is afgebeeld met daarop zowel een vredessymbool als de woorden ‘born to kill.'” – From The Introduction.

Softcover – 192 pp. – Dimensions 25 x 20 cm (9,8 x 7,9 inch) – Weight 866 g (30,5 oz) – PUBLISHER Taschen GmbH, Köln, Germany, 2003 – ISBN 3-8228-2697-9

Stan: The Life of Stan Laurel (Fred Lawrence Guiles)

Guiles, Fred Lawrence - Stan The Life of Stan LaurelStan, surprisingly, is the first full-length biography of the legendary comic who was the creative half of the universally loved duo, Laurel and Hardy.

Based upon scores of interviews with family and friends (including intimate diaries of Virginia Ruth Laurel, whom Stan married three times) and enhanced by a magnificent collection of previously unpublished photographs, Stan tells the very human story of Lauren’s struggle to survive against difficult odds, personal and professional.

From precarious beginnings in vaudeville with Charlie Chaplin, skinny Stan changed his name and rose to enjoy success and universal acclaim with his big-bellied partner Oliver Hardy. Yet beneath the exterior of the wistful comic whose sense of humor gave pleasure to so many millions, was a man beset by financial worries, alcohol and unhappy personal relationships that encompassed many dalliances and six marriages.

This superb biography provides new insight into the supremely talented man behind the screen image and a fascinating panorama of show business in the first half of this century.

FRED LAWRENCE GUILES is the author of three other acclaimed biographies of Hollywood stars – Norma Jean: The Life of Marilyn Monroe, which passed the million mark in sales and is available in fourteen languages, Marion Davies and Tyrone Power: The Last Idol. Mr. Guiles lives in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and teaches film history at Franklin and Marshall College.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 15,5 cm (9,5 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 603 g (21,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Stein and Day, Publishers, Briarcliff Manor, New York, 1980 – ISBN 0-8128-2762-7

Stanwyck (Axel Madsen)

Madsen, Axel - Stanwyck“Naive, unsophisticated, caring nothing about makeup, clothes, or hairdos, this chorus girl could grab your heart and tear it to pieces,” Frank Capra wrote of her. “She just turned it on – and everything else on the stage stopped.

Barbara Stanwyck thrilled millions in scene after scene, picture after picture, over a six-decade career that took her from an impoverished childhood in the streets of Brooklyn to the pinnacle of Golden Age Hollywood. At once tough and vulnerable, straight-talking but emotionally elusive, she electrified every production in which she appeared, from Hollywood B-flicks to such classics as Stella Dallas, Double Indemnity, and television’s The Thorn Birds. She was an early role model for women dissatisfied with the standard Hollywood heroine, and a tantalizing challenge to men who wanted more. Her honesty and authenticity resonate even more powerfully today – but her complete story has never been told before.

Axel Madsen’s Stanwyck is the first authorative life of this fascinating and notoriously private star, who until now has eluded biographers. Madsen first interviewd Stanwyck in 1969 and over the years has exhaustively researched her life and career and interviewed scores of important sources, many of whom felt free to talk candidly only after her death in 1990.

In this penetrating, sensitive portrait, Madsen traces the orphaned Stanwyck from her childhood in a succession of foster homes and her gritty days as a Ziegfeld chorus girl, to triumph in Hollywood at its zenith, through her lonely final years. He examines Stanwyck’s two famous marriages – the divergent career trajectories and violence that destroyed the first, to Broadway star Frank Fay, and the troubled sexual dynamics at the heart of her celebrated union with Robert Taylor, probing for the first time rumors of Taylor’s homosexuality and the wide-spread belief that Stanwyck was bisexual. And with sympathy and insights he explores the depths of Stanwyck’s obsession with Taylor years after their devastating break-up, and her decades-long estrangement from her son.

Barbara Stanwyck is one of America’s most riveting screen icons, and endlessly intriguing enigma. Now, at last, with Stanwyck, Axel Madsen takes fans to the heart of the mystery, to reveal the complex, indomitable woman beneath the facade.

AXEL MADSEN’s many books range from critically acclaimed biographies of André Malraux, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Simone de Beauvoir to popular successes like Chanel and Gloria and Joe. He lives in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and Hollywood.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 434 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 15,5 cm (9,5 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 892 g (31,5 oz) – PUBLISHER HarperCollins Publishers, New York, New York, 1994 – ISBN 0-06-017997-X

A Star Danced (Gertrude Lawrence)

Lawrence, Gertrude - A Star DancedWhen a glamorous and superlative star lets down her lustrous hair and writes about her romances, her marriages, her personal friends on and off the stage and winds up with excerpts from her exciting war diary, it is bound to make good reading. Gertrude Lawrence takes us backstage from the time she danced to the barrel organ on London’s drab sidewalks to the time she played a farewell to Canadian troops in Antwerp last September, singing amid the din of Van Rundstedt’s mortars.

It all began one bank holiday in Brighton when little “Gertie” put a penny in the fortune-telling machine. Out came a slip of paper reading simply: “A star danced… and under it you were born.” At ten she left school and began to make her own living. From pantomime to musical comedy, Gertrude Lawrence danced, laughed, and sang her way. There were tough times – shows sometimes failed, managers decamped with the actors’ pay, and once Miss Lawrence became a barmaid to pay a board bill.

But she kept her lovely smile, and in 1917 she got her long-awaited chance. A telegram offered her a part in Charlot’s Revue in London. One of the girls had a friend in a regiment camped near by, and he and his pals raised the money which sent Gertrude Lawrence to London and stardom.

In London, as understudy for Beatrice Lillie, she got her first break when Miss Lillie was thrown from a horse. As lead in the show, it became increasingly noticeable to the audience that she was pregnant. Her popularity grew with her pregnancy, and she starred in Charlot’s Revue for seven months. Her career was only temporarily halted by the biggest Zeppelin raid on London, when she crawled into a nursing home and was delivered of a baby girl.

Thus begins a gallant, heart-warming story, the story of a woman who went from poverty and despair to become the toast of two continents. L.S.B. Shapiro, the seasoned war correspondent of the Canadian forces overseas, has written of Miss Lawrence: “Her work is characterized by ardor made effortless and by painstaking skill bathed in a soft light of spontaneity.”

This spontaneity has enabled her to deliver a “well-mannered Coward piece before a gilt-edged audience and to cavort a psychopathic fandango by Moss Hart” with equal skill. Playing to soldier audiences who are the most critical and forbidding on earth, Miss Lawrence sensed exactly what it was they wanted and needed, and in this way maintained that bond between home and the lonely men far from home.

Working with ENSA, the British USO, Miss Lawrence covered the Western front. But she covered all fronts from the Riviera to St. James’s Palace, from Mayfair to Broadway. Through stormy romances and bankruptcy she has risen to the peak of stardom. In A Star Danced, she tells her own remarkable story – a story spiked with anecdote and filled with warmth.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 238 pp. – Dimensions 20,5 x 14 cm (8,1 x 5,5 inch) – Weight 321 g (11,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Doubleday, Doran and Co., Inc., Garden City, New York, 1945

A Star Is Born: The Making of the 1954 Movie and Its 1983 Restoration (Ronald Haver)

haver-ronald-a-star-is-bornThe film historian Ronald Haver re-creates the Hollywood of the early 1950s, a changing postwar metropolis whose legendary movie industry was beset by dwindling audiences and rocked by technological revolutions (such as Cinerama), a time when everything was still thought possible and no one could foresee that the age of the great Hollywood studios would soon come to an end.

We learn how Judy Garland’s husband Sid Luft orchestrated the deal for the most important movie of her career and how co-star James Mason was chosen; also covered are the day-to-day filming, the myriad technical problems, the clashes of personalities and working styles, and the costs of what became the second most expensive film made up to that time. And we learn about Haver’s laborious effort in the early 1980s to restore lost footage.

Softcover – 300 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 15,5 cm (9,3 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 582 g (20,5 oz) – PUBLISHER Harper & Row, Publishers, New York, New York, 1988 – ISBN 0-06-097274-2

The Star Machine (Jeanine Basinger)

Basinger, Jeanine - The Star MakerFrom one of our leading authorities, a rich, penetrating, amusing plum pudding of a book about the golden age of movies, full of Hollywood lore, anecdotes, and analysis.

Jeanine Basinger gives us an immensely entertaining look into the “star machine,” examining how, at the height of the studio system, from the 1930s to the 1950s, the studios worked to manufacture star actors and actresses. With revelatory insights and delightful asides, she shows us how the machine worked when it worked, how it failed when it didn’t, and how irrelevant it could sometimes be. She gives us the “human factor,” case studies focusing on big stars groomed into the system: the “awesomely beautiful” (and disillusioned) Tyrone Power; the seductive, disobedient Lana Turner; and a dazzling cast of others – Loretta Young, Errol Flynn, Irene Dunne, Deanna Durbin. She anatomizes their careers, showing how their fame happened, and what happened to them as a result. (Both Lana Turner and Errol Flynn, for instance, were involved in notorious court cases.) In her trenchantly observed conclusion, she explains what has become of the star machine and why the studio’s practice of “making” stars is no longer relevant.

Deeply engrossing, full of energy, wit, and wisdom, The Star Machine is destined to become an invaluable part of the film canon.

JEANINE BASINGER is the chair of the film studies at Wesleyan University and the curator of the cinema archives there. She has written nine other books on film, including A Woman’s View: How Hollywood Spoke to Women, 1930-1960; Silent Stars, winner of the William K. Everson Award for Film History; The World War II Combat: Anatomy of a Genre; and American Cinema: 100 Years of Filmmaking, the companion book for a ten-part PBS series. She lives with her huisband in Middletown, Connecticut.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 586 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 997 g (35,2 oz) – PUBLISHER Alfred A. Knopf, New York, New York, 2007 – ISBN 978-1-4000-4130-5

The Star Makers: On Set With Hollywood’s Greatest Directors (Bob Willoughby; foreword by Sydney Pollack)

willoughby-ob-the-star-makers-on-the-set-with-hollywoods-greatest-directorsBob Willoughby is one of the foremost photojournalists of the movie industry, and was the first “outside” photographer to work on Hollywood closed sets. Since the early 1950s he has documented the making of hundreds of Hollywood films, taking intimate portraits of stars and directors that reflect the drama and emotions of movie-making both on and off the screen. From such 1950s classics as Anthony Mann’s The Glenn Miller Story, Nicholas Ray’s Rebel Without a Cause, and Otto Preminger’s The Man With the Golden Arm, through such major films of the 1960s and 1970s as George Cukor’s My Fair Lady, Mike Nichols’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Roman Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby, Sydney Pollack’s They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?, and David Lean’s Ryan’s Daughter to such films of the 1980s as John Landis’s An American Werewolf in London and Jean-Jacques Annaud’s In the Name of the Rose, this book is a fascinating album of Bob Willoughby’s memorable shots. Here you will see directors guiding, cajoling, coaxing, shouting at, or even pleading with such luminaries as Audrey Hepburn, Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, William Holden, Montgomery Clift, Jane Fonda, Katharine Hepburn, Jack Lemmon, Judy Garland, Frank Sinatra, Sophia Loren, Rex Harrison, Sean Connery and Peter O’Toole into giving what is often one of the greatest performances of their lives. With more than 500 illustrations, accompanied by Willoughby’s own fascinating observations of how each film was made, The Star Makers is a stunning and engaging tribute to the most popular art form and to some of the greatest and most creative personalities of modern times.

BOB WILLOUGHBY was born in Los Angeles and began working in the studios of Hollywood in the early 1950s. He has been described by the magazine Popular Photography as “The man who virtually invented the photojournalistic picture still.” His photographs can be found in major national and international collections worldwide.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 351 pp., index – Dimensions 28,5 x 24,5 cm (11,2 x 9,7 inch) – Weight 1.885 g (66,5 oz) – PUBLISHER Merrell Publishers Limited, London, 2003 – ISBN 1 85894 233 0

Starmaker: The Autobiography of Hal B. Wallis (Hal B. Wallis, with Charles Higham; foreword by Katharine Hepburn)

wallis-hal-b-starmakerDiscoverer of great stars – including Elvis Presley, Dean Martin, Humphrey Bogart, Shirley MacLaine, Errol Flynn, Charlton Heston, Kirk Douglas, and Jerry Lewis – Hal Wallis, legendary Oscar-winning producer of Casablanca, The Maltese Falcon, and over one hundred other classic pictures, has led a life most people only dream about.

In this exciting memoir, told in conjunction with best-selling biographer Charles Higham, Wallis relates countless never-before-told stories about the great and powerful. We learn much that is new and surprising about his close friends and starring players John Wayne and Katharine Hepburn (who supplied a memorable foreword to the book); about his famous wives, actresses Louise Fazenda and Martha Hyer; about the tempestuous Anna Magnani; and about Paul Muni, Audrey Hepburn, Joan Fontaine, Jennifer Jones, Richard Burton, Elizabeth Taylor, Genevieve Bujold, Vanessa Redgrave, Glenda Jackson, and Tony Curtis. Few autobiographies have had so glittering an international cast; few picturemakers have told the truth about Hollywood so wittily, realistically, and with so few illusions.

And along with the startling stories about world-famous actors and actresses, Wallis gives us unique insight into some of the century’s greatest films. He tells how he defied Warner Bros. to film the lives of famous writers, scientists, politicians, and sportsmen, such as Emile Zola, Louis Pasteur, Sergeant York, and Knute Rockne. How he made the unforgettable musicals, Gold Diggers of 1933 and Yankee Doodle Dandy. How he dealt with the forbidden themes of cancer (Dark Victory), syphilis (Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet), Nazi collaboration in America  (Confessions of a Nazi Spy), and inherited madness (King’s Row). He talks of his happy relationships with great writers, including Tennessee Williams and Lillian Hellman. A main theme of this book is his hilarious battle with blue-nosed censorship, which strove to clean up Hollywood pictures in a more puritanical age.

Wallis also tells the exciting story of the making of wartime propaganda pictures for the U.S. government, films like Air Force, Captains of the Clouds, and Dive Bomber. The ordeal of shooting these difficult pictures on location in Canada, Florida, and San Diego made for epic movie adventure. Wallis relates colorful stories of producing Becket, Anne of the Thousand Days, and Mary, Queen of Scots under hazardous conditions in England and Scotland. We see the stars, some temperamental and childish, some authoritative and forceful, all of them observed from the inside.

Finally, Wallis tells of one of his greatest moments: receiving the Order of Commander of the British Empire by order of Queen Elizabeth II in recognition of his international fame as one of the greatest figures of Hollywood’s golden age.

CHARLES HIGHAM, son of Sir Charles Higham, MP, is a former Regents Professor of the University of California and recipient of the major French literary prize, Prix des Createurs. His lives of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Orson Welles, Katharine Hepburn, Florenz Ziegfeld, Errol Flynn, and Marlene Dietrich have earned him an international reputation. He is also the author of five volumes of verse and is much anthologized. He has published the college textbook The Art of the American Film and literary and film essays in The Hudson Review and The Kenyon Review. He lives in Los Angeles.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 240 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 642 g (22,6 oz) – PUBLISHER Macmillan Publishing Company, New York, New York, 1980 – ISBN 0-02-623170-0

Star Maker: The Story of D. W. Griffith (Homer Croy; introduction by Mary Pickford)

Croy, Homer - Star Maker the Story of D W GriffithThis is the first story ever written of the life of David Wark Griffith, the great film pioneer, and it is written by the same author who, forty years ago, wrote the first book ever written on how motion pictures are made.

At the height of his career, Griffith lived in a blaze of publicity, the towering giant of the dazzling new world of motion pictures, fabulously rich and successful. But the publicity was all for his stars and his stories. Griffith told little of himself, especially of his early life, and nothing of his personal life. He never spoke of his secret marriage.

Homer Croy has traced the life of D.W. Griffith from early days. He has had access to Griffith’s partial autobiography, still in manuscript form, which deals with those early  years and gives vivid pictures of his life as a farm boy. In addition, a vast amount of intimate material has come from people who knew him and worked with him.

Among the many who provided facts and stories for this trail-blazing biography are Lillian Gish, Dorothy Gish, Mary Pickford, Anita Loos, Mae Marsh, Richard Barthelmess, and Mrs. D.W. Griffith. Other help came from D.W. Griffith’s family and from newspapermen, one of whom knew Griffith for thirty years.

The story of the great Star Maker is as dramatic and moving as one of his own great movies. This dynamic and gifted figure who shaped a new art in so many and such brilliant ways ended his days in loneliness and defeat. The world figure became a forgotten man. The man who made so many stars so celebrated and successful was himself termed a failure at last.

But the record of his achievements is not a record of failure. lndeed, such motion pictures as The Birth of a Nation, Intolerance, and Broken Blossoms have established his fame permanently, and he remains one of the most creative, important, and enduring figures of the world of motion pictures.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 210 pp., index – Dimensions 21 x 14 cm (8,3 x 5,5 inch) – Weight 387 g (13,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Duell, Sloane and Pearce, New York, New York, 1959

Star Mothers: The Moms Behind the Celebrities (Georgia Holt, Phyllis Quinn, Sue Russell)

holt-georgia-star-mothers“I imagine being handed an entry key to the most exclusive club in the world! Being a star mom is rather like that. But it’s something you have no control over whatsoever. When your child becomes a star, a ripple effect – more like a tidal wave, really – sweeps the entire family along. While glamorous at times, my life is far from being all premieres and chauffeur-driven limousines. Most star moms would admit that not only do you touch the heights, you also plummet to the depths of despair when your child is a star.” – From The Introduction by Georgia Holt, mother of Cher.

Where do stars come from? What is it like to be the mother of a celebrity? Star Mothers, based on frank interviews with dozens of mothers and their celebrity children, is filled with revealing anecdotes about stage mothers and absent fathers, about loving children and mothers who settle for reflected glory instead of regular contact, about the pain that leads to fame – and the fame that leads to pain. We see stars in the making, families breaking, and the often ambiguous rewards of super success. We learn how stardom can reverse the power relations in a family, casting parents in the role of children. And we see how ambitions flower and wilt, how the dearest mother can become Mommy Dearest, and how rough roads can lead to rich rewards.

For stargazers as well as mothers of children ordinary and extraordinary, Star Mothers is a candid chronicle of despair and triumph, of pain and pride – an intimate look at the real women behind the myths.

GEORGIA HOLT, entertainer and former beauty queen, is the co-executive producer of the first and second annual Mother’s Day television special, Superstars and Their Moms, in which she appeared with her daughter Cher. PHYLLIS QUINN, president of Motion Picture Mothers and former president of Screen Smart Set, is the co-executive producer of Superstars and Their Moms. SUE RUSSELL is an internationally syndicated reporter who has written for Redbook, Us, and Family Weekly.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 416 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 791 g (27,9 oz) – PUBLISHER Simon & Schuster, New York, New York, 1988 – ISBN 0-671-64510-2

The Stars Appear (Richard Dyer MacCann)

dyer-maccann-richard-the-stars-appearThe first thirty years of motion pictures were a major turning-point in American culture. With all its idiosyncrasies, wildness, charm, and freshness, this period still had its seriousness, conscious of being new, yet largely unsure of its goals. Hollywood was the 20th century‘s new frontier, fortified with values and attitudes from the 19th century.

At the heart of it all were the unpredictable, hardworking, lively, beautiful people who were chosen to appear on the screen. Most of them were there, not for art, but out of dire necessity. The women especially, poor and often lacking a male parent, discovered how things worked and learned to reap wealth from popularity.

The American people have always wanted stars like themselves to love. The really big box-office stars, while they certainly range from the boy- and girl-next-door to more sophisticated types, have usually represented the common traits of an ideal democratic society: moral strength, a tilt forward generosity and social responsibility, and more than a trace of self-deprecation and humor. The performers who were most likely to have these qualities were those who made their way on their own, took their chances, worked hard, and never forgot either their struggle for fame or the public that rewarded them with success.

Success was no myth for Douglas Fairbanks. By the time he chose to play Robin Hood (1922), he could snap his fingers and have built for him the biggest set since Intolerance. The set was no myth and neither were the millions that came in at the box-office.

In the 1920s, certainly, such personalities seemed to many people more alive and genuine and worthy of emulation than the Presidential leaders of that decade. Acquaintance with these famous and influential people is essential for the student of American history and culture. It would be a curious foreshortening of American civilization to study only the intellectual or political or literary events of the time and leave out the movie stars.

Professor RICHARD DYER MacCANN’s degrees are from Kansas, Stanford, and Harvard, and he has taught at USC, Kansas, and Iowa. From 1951 to 1960 he was Hollywood correspondent for The Christian Science Monitor, and from 1967 to 1976 was editor of Cinema Journal. He is the author of forty published articles and eight books, including Hollywood in Transition, Film: A Montage of Theories, and The People’s Films. He has produced a number of works on film and videotape, including a series of 12 half-hour illustrated lectures coordinate with the titles of the books in this series.

Softcover – 321 pp., index – Dimensions 21,5 x 13,5 cm (8,5 x 5,3 inch) – Weight 384 g (13,5 oz) – PUBLISHER The Scarecrow Press, Inc., Metuchen, New Jersey in association with Image & Idea, Iowa City, Iowa, 1992 – ISBN 0-8108-2528-7

Stars of the Twenties (Mary Dawn Early; photographs by James Abbe; introduction by Lillian Gish)

Early, Mary Dawn - Stars of the TwentiesPhotographer of the great and near-great on many continents, James Abbe was possibly the first to capture candid spontaneity in photographing celebrities. Of the cumbersome view camera he used in the twenties he later admitted, ‘Because of the necessary time exposures, I’d frequently resort to the Mathew Brady technique of virtually hypnotising my subject while I exposed the film.’ The incredible range of photographs shown here demonstrates just how successful he was in conveying this ideal of suspended action.

Well-remembered pictures of Rudolph Valentino, Gloria Swanson, Charlie Chaplin, Ronald Colman (whom Abbe can claim to have ‘discovered’), John Barrymore, Helen Hayes, Mae West, Al Jolson, and many, many more, bear witness to his involvement with the early days of the movies. In addition his portraits of Pavlova, Nijinska, Beatrice Lillie, Gertrude Lawrence, Noël Coward and other personalities of the decade, as well as intriguing backstage shots of the Moulin Rouge, Folies-Bergère, and Ziegfeld Follies, and ‘stills’ taken during rehearsals, demonstrate still further the many facets of Abbe’s skill.

Abbe went on to combine writing with photography and to become a pioneer in photojournalism. From there it was a natural step to war correspondent, radio news commentator, and television critic. It is the Abbe portraits of the twenties, however, that bring us today all the shining brightness of his special talent.

MARY DAWN EARLEY was born and educated in England. After extensive travelling across the world, she settled in the United States where she has been Picture Editor of American Heritage magazine for the past fourteen years.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 105 pp. – Dimensions 28,5 x 22 cm (11,2 x 8,7 inch) – Weight 715 g (25,2 oz) – PUBLISHER Thames and Hudson, London, 1975 – ISBN 0 500 01138 9

Steps in Time (Fred Astaire)

astaire-fred-steps-in-timeHere is a self-portrait by Fred Astaire as charming and informal as one of his seemingly effortless flights of dancing. Fred Astaire’s dancing career began with his entrancing sister and famous partner, Adele, in a kiddie show in Keyport, N.J., with Fred playing a lobster and Adele a glass of champagne. This was the era of Jesse L. Lasky’s “Piano Phiends” and similar vaudeville attractions.

After some near disasters on the circuits, the Astaires were found by the Shuberts, and then the fun really began. In London and New York they starred in a famous series of musical comedies, composed by George Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Cole Porter and others. They were sought after by royalty abroad and by the sparkling elite of the American twenties. Adele retired to marry the second son of the Duke of Devonshire, leaving Fred with a crisis to solve in his own cereer. The solution was provided by such partners as Ginger Rogers, Eleanor Powell, Rita Hayworth, Betty Hutton and others in many memorable musicals and movies.

More than a story of the theater, movies, television, and of international society, Steps in Time introduces to us one of the most beguiling men of his generation – his uniquely happy family life, his passion for racing horses and golf, his many personal and professional rewards as well as the mishaps he has known. “Bad-tempered, impatient, hard-to-please,” he says of himself – but the reader will find him in these pages a disarming, gay and altogether human gentleman. Steps in Time has the taste of sharp candor and the sparkle of the best champagne.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 338 pp. – Dimensions 22 x 14,5 cm (8,7 x 5,7 inch) – Weight 590 g (20,8 oz) – PUBLISHER Harper & Brothers, Publishers, New York, New York, 1959

Sterren kijken (Simon Van Collem)

van-collem-simon-sterren-kijkenVoor veel Nederlanders is Simon van Collem een goede bekende. Zijn televisie-uitzendingen De oude draaidoos hebben een grote populariteit verworven en deze pocket zal dan ook voor velen een aangename verrassing zijn. In dit speelse Zwarte Beertje heeft Simon van Collem een aantal belevenissen op schrift gesteld over de filmsterren die hij in de loop der jaren heeft ontmoet.

Hij maakt kennis met de sympathieke Peter Ustinov, hij dineert overvloedig met de interessante Hildegard Knef en wordt voorgesteld aan de pas verworven bruid van Peter Sellers. ‘lt’s a mad, mad, mad, mad world’ die wereld van grime en celluloid en wie kan ons daar beter in introduceren dan Simon van Collem?

Softcover – 190 pp. – Dimensions 17,5 x 10,5 cm (6,9 x 4,1 inch) – Weight 133 g (4,7 oz) – PUBLISHER A.W. Bruna & Zoon, Utrecht, The Netherlands, 1965

Steve McQueen: Photographs (foreword and commentary by William Claxton)

claxton-william-steve-mcqueen“Motion pictures and film actors have always been an important part of my life. Every day I can recall a movie or a scene from a movie that has had an influence on my behavior or my point of view. As a young moviegoer, I never realized that one day I would meet and, what’s more, photograph many of these film stars. It all began when I was a little boy. My sister, Colleen, and I would be dropped off at our local movie theater early Saturday afternoons and be left there until late that night. The movie theater became a metaphor for babysitter. Sometimes our older brother would grudgingly accompany us, but he wouldn’t sit with us. He wasn’t about to be seen babysitting in front of his friends. It wasn’t uncommon for many of the parents in our neighborhood to leave their children in the safe haven of this little local cinema. We all felt perfectly safe. But, of course, that was the late 1930s and early 1940s. It was a much safer and trusting time. The theater owner always kept an eye on us as well as all of the other kids who frequented his establishment. His name was appropriately Monty Friend and his movie house was the Montrose Theater. It was a place of sheer joy for us.

We would sit through the double features, a comedy, a cartoon, The March of Time, and the coming attractions several times. Our nourishment came from Hershey bars and popcorn. At some point in the early evening, Monty Friend would call to us quietly in the dark theater to let us know that our parents had come to pick us up and were waiting in the family car out front.

It wasn’t easy for me to leave the movie house. The 40 x 40 foot images that appeared on the screen became the other people in my life. The giant faces of the film actors would become the other members of my family. Sometimes the movies would reflect the beautiful side, sometimes the frightening side, and sometimes even the boring side of my celluloid, extended family. For example, Cary Grant, Dick Powell, James Stewart, Gary Cooper, and Clark Gable were the buddies I wanted to have on my side when I grew up. As for the beautiful Irene Dunne and Norma Shearer, and Jean Arthur, I could count on them for their warm and friendly personalities. My all-time favorite was Myrna Loy. Beautiful, smart, witty, and with a unique voice, she could do no wrong, especially if she was paired with William Powell, Spencer Tracy, or Clark Gable. Lana Turner, Hedy Lamarr, Ava Gardner, and Lena Horne offered unbelievable glamour, almost too good to be true. On the other side, Joan Crawford and Bette Davis absolutely frightened me. I could count on Bob Hope, Jack Benny and Rochester, Gracie Allen and Zasu Pitts to make me laugh. Greer Garson and Walter Pidgeon were my parents, or the kind of parents I wished my real-life parents would be like.

I was completely convinced that when Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney would “rent a barn and stage a musical” I could do the same thing in my backyard. What a great idea. Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers provided the best in black and white screen entertainment in those wonderful RKO musicals. Great tunes sung in a black, white, and silver setting, very art deco. Those sets were the ultimate nightclubs to me, with silver and white palm trees, big winding staircases, and penthouses overlooking the skyscrapers. Gunga Din, The G-Men, gangsters, and car chases offered my kind of excitement.” – From The Foreword.

Softcover – 192 pp. – Dimensions 25 x 20 cm (9,8 x 7,9 inch) – Weight 867 g (30,6 oz) – PUBLISHER Taschen GmbH, Köln, Germany, 2004 – ISBN 3-8228-3117-4

Steve McQueen: The Legend of a Rebel Superstar (Malachi McCoy)

mccoy-malachy-steve-mcqueen-the-legend-of-a-rebel-superstarSteve McQueen wielded a power rarely matched in Hollywood. He commanded a million dollars a film. His wild escapades drew little reproof. His withdrawn ways, his unpredictable behaviour, all were somehow part of the chemistry that made him a superstar.

Here is the most candid look at the fascinating man who became a legend. From reform school to anonymous Marine Private, McQueen surfaced as an actor and then rose to stardom in films like The Great Escape, The Cincinatti Kid, Bullitt, and Papillon.

The book sheds bold light on the forces that drove him, and the unique place he earned in contemporary films. This is an unforgettable revelation of the star who spoke to the rebel in us all.

Note: Steve McQueen was first published in hardcover in 1974, and in paperback in 1975. This new 1981 edition is reprinted with the original text, but with additional pbotographs on page 8 of the insert, and a new chapter beginning on page 210, covering the final period in the life of Steve McQueen.

Softcover – 224 pp. – Dimensions 17,5 x 11 cm (6,9 x 4,3 inch) – Weight 131 g (4,6 oz) – PUBLISHER Hodder and Soughton, Ltd., Sevenoaks, Kent, 1980 – ISBN 0 340 27059 4

Steven Spielberg (John Baxter; originally titled Steven Spielberg: The Unauthorised Biography)

baxter-john-steven-spielbergHij is de goeroe van de hedendaagse cinema, een god die Hollywood nieuwe wegen wees. Zijn films worden door sommigen beschouwd als toonbeelden van inhoudsloos technisch kunnen. Maar van Tokio tot Parijs kochten honderden miljoenen een kaartje voor Jaws, E.T., Close Encounters en Jurassic Park. Want als geen ander begrijpt Steven Spielberg wat het publiek verwacht van ‘een avondje film.’ Hoe kon de onhandige Steven, opgroeiend in een wereld van formica en diepvriespizza’s, voor wie de tv de status van opvoeder had en die – ook nu nog – meer belangstelling heeft voor Pinokkio dan voor boeken, uitgroeien tot megaster van de filmindustrie? En hoe komt het dat de man van de grote kassuccessen voor velen de meest gehate man van Hollywood is die pas met Schindler’s List een Oscar waardig werd bevonden?

John Baxter spitte met mierenvlijt in de archieven en scenario’s. Hij sprak met zakenpartners, acteurs, technici en collega’s. Het resultaat is een onthullend en meeslepend boek, waarin voortdurend intelligente lijnen worden uitgezet tussen Spielbergs films en diens verleden. Daarnaast laat Baxter zijn licht schijnen op de huidige generatie filmmakers, het hedendaagse Hollywood en op de toekomst van de filmindustrie als geheel. Dat maakt zijn boek niet alleen belangwekkend voor Spielberg-fans maar voor iedereen die geïnteresseerd is in de hedendaagse cinema en zijn toekomst.

JOHN BAXTER is filmcriticus, romanschrijver en biograaf. Hij publiceerde onder meer biografieën over Federico Fellini, Luis Buñuel, Stanley Kubrick. Hij werd geboren in Australië, werkte in Londen, doceerde in de VS en woont momenteel in Parijs.

Softcover – 460 pp., index – Dimensions 23 x 15 cm (9,1 x 5,9 inch) – Weight 732 g (25,8 oz) – PUBLISHER Elmar, Rijswijk, The Netherlands, 1996 – ISBN 90-389-0549-1

Steven Spielberg: Father to the Man (Andrew Yule)

Yule, Andrew - Steven SpielbergSteven Spielberg’s power as a director, producer and box-office magnet now exceeds that of the greatest movie moguls of Hollywood’s golden era. while his films – most notably Jaws. Close Encounters of the Third Kind, E.T., the three Indiana Jones chronicles and Jurassic Park – have grossed billions around the world.

But it was not until his Oscar-sweeping epic Schindler’s List that Spielberg finally confounded many of the critics who had accused him of representing little more than a commercial production line. Satisfying both popular and critical tastes for the first time, the film hinted not only at a new-found maturity, but also at a darker side to Spieiberg’s psyche than had hitherto been evident in his work. Probing deeply beneath the benign image that Spielberg likes to portray, Andrew Yule’s definitive biography reveals the self-doubt that has dogged Spielberg all his life, the constant search for the family warmth he never experienced as a child, the often ruthless wheeling and dealing that has become his trademark, the quickly buried flops among his sparkling successes.

As he traces Spielberg’s rise against the background of a rapidly evolving Hollywood, the author demonstrates how Spielberg’s relationships with power-brokers like Warner’s supremo Steve Ross (‘the father I never had’) and Universal’s Sidney Sheinberg (‘the elder brother I wish I’d had’), together with the wake-up call provided by Sony’s takeover of Columbia Pictures and Matsushita’s absorption of MCA and Universal, paved the way for his teaming with David Geffen and Jeffrey Katzenberg in the groundbreaking formation of Dreamworks, the first new Hollywood studio in over half a century, a multi-media colossus in the making.

Apart from countless graphic examples of Spielberg’s ferocious dealmaking, and a dramatic re-examination of the fatal accident on Twilight Zone The Movie that haunts him to this day, Yule’s many other provocative revelations include details of the filmmaker’s personal vendettas, the regular accusations of power abuse levelled against him, as well as a sensational blow-by-blow account – never before told – of a decades-old contract dispute that strikes at the very heart of Spielberg’s integrity, and has mushroomed into a multi-million-dollar legal battle.

Uncompromising and uncensored, Steven Spielberg: Father Of The Man is a remarkably candid journey through the meteoric career and complex relationships of the one man able to claim the first century of cinema as his own.

ANDREW YULE is the author of the highly acclaimed Hollywood A-Go-Go, the best-selling biographies David Puttnam: The Story So Far, Al Pacino: A Life on the Wire, and Sean Connery: Neither Shaken Nor Stirred. He divides his time between Kilmarnock, Scotland, and New York City.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 395 pp., index – Dimensions 21,5 x 14,5 cm (8,5 x 5,7 inch) – Weight 561 g (19,8 oz) – PUBLISHER Little, Brown and Company, London, 1996 – ISBN 0-316-91363-4

Steven Spielberg: Interviews (edited by Lester D. Friedman, Brent Notbohm)

friedman-lester-d-steven-spielberg-interviews“The thing that I’m just scared to death of is that someday I’m going to wake up and bore somebody with a film.”

Steven Spielberg has become a force that extends far beyond the movie screen. His vast output of popular films includes some of the most crowd-pleasing movies of all time. These interviews with this superstar director of blockbusters range from his early years to the present time. They chart his successes as a brash young filmmaker trying to make his way in Hollywood, his spectacular triumphs, and his maturation as a director to inspire the imagination with deeply meaningful subjects.

LESTER D. FRIEDMAN teaches medical humanities and bioethics at Upstate Medical University and cinema studies in the College of Visual and Performing Arts at Syracuse University. BRENT NOTBOHM is an independent filmmaker and freelance instructor of film production and media studies. He lives in Spring Green, Wisconsin.

Softcover – 250 pp., index – Dimensions 23 x 15 cm (9 x 6 inch) – Weight 476 g (16,8 oz) – PUBLISHER University Press of Mississippi, Jackson, Mississippi, 2000 – ISBN 1-57806-113-X

Stijliconen en Idolen: Film & Mode (Adrian Stahlecker)

scannen0324De Eerste Wereldoorlog bracht grote veranderingen teweeg in de man-vrouw-relatie. Terwijl hun mannen aan het front waren, moesten de vrouwen het zelf maar zien te rooien, wat leidde tot grotere emancipatie. Doordat bovendien veel soldaten op het slagveld waren omgekomen, leidde een vrouwenoverschot tot meer seksuele vrijheid.

Modeontwerpers voelden de veranderde maatschappij haarfijn aan. Couturiers als Poiret en Coco Chanel verlosten vrouwen van de tot over hun enkels reikende rokken en pijnlijke rijgkorsetten. Vrouwen toonden hun onafhankelijkheid door het lange haar kort te knippen en ultrakorte rokken te dragen. In plaats van walsen en polka’s werden wilde dansen als de Charleston, Black Bottom en Shimmy populair. Deze periode zou de geschiedenis ingaan als de Roaring Twenties.

Kort na de Tweede Wereldoorlog vond er een revolutie plaats op modegebied toen Christian Dior de New Look introduceerde: plisserende rokken tot 25 centimeter van de vloer waarin meters stof verwerkt werden. Parijs kreeg in de zestiger jaren als modestad concurrentie van Milaan, Londen en New York. Ook Hollywood zou door de jaren heen een stempel op het modebeeld drukken door talentvolle ontwerpers als Adrian Gilbert, Travis Banton, Edith Head, et cetera. Vrouwen imiteerden door de jaren heen kleding, kapsels en make-up van hun favoriete sterren.

In Stijliconen en Idolen probeert de auteur een beeld te scheppen van het steeds veranderende modebeeld. Trends en rages die elkaar vliegensvlug inhalen. De Franse dichter-filosoof Jean Cocteau sprak eens wijze woorden: ‘Mode sterft jong.’

ADRIAN STAHLECKER werd in 1937 in Den Haag geboren. Hij volgde lessen op de Vrije Academie en maakte in 1961 zijn debuut als schilder. Hij exposeerde zijn werk door de jaren heen in zowel binnen- als buitenland. Van 1962 tot 1973 woonde hij in Barcelona. Hij schreef onder meer: Film en kunst in ballingschap 1933-1945, Duitse kunstenaars op de vlucht voor het naziregime; Hildegard Knef, een ster en een tijdperk; Goebbels’ droomfabrieken; Een liefde tussen oorlog en vrede: de stormachtige relatie tussen Marlene Dietrich en Jean Gabin; Romy Schneider, een leven vol triomfen en tragedies; Schilderwijk en Society, fragmenten uit het leven van een Haagse kunstenaar en De Muze Ine Veen.

Softcover – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 15,5 cm (9,3 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 459 g (16,2 oz) – PUBLISHER Uitgeverij Aspekt, Soesterberg, The Netherlands, 2007 – ISBN 9059115988

Stone: The Controversies, Excesses, and Exploits of a Radical Filmmaker (James Riordan; foreword by Michael Douglas)

riorda-james-stoneOliver Stone is America’s most controversial filmmaker. From Platoon to The Doors to the incendiary JFK, there’s no moviegoer in the country whom he hasn’t intrigued or enraged. Now, in this first full biography, author James Riordan has interviewed Stone, the actors who’ve starred in his films, and his family and friends, to assemble a complete portrait of Stone’s professional achievements and personal demons.

Growing up in Manhattan, the son of a Jewish Wall Street financier and a French socialite art-crowd mother, Stone received only sporadic attention from his parents. Sent to a strict boarding school that allowed students to visit their homes only on holidays, Stone struggled to prepare for college, only to be devastated when the school’s headmaster informed him of his parents’ affairs. Stone then learned that his mother’s uncontrolled spending over the years and the divorce had left the once wealthy family deep in debt. Through the rest of high school, home was either his mother’s place with her artistic but decadent party crowd, or his father’s apartment with its frequent women visitors.

Under family pressure Stone entered Yale, but wound up dropping out and enlisting in the army. The book chronicles Stone’s experiences in Vietnam, witnessing murder and rape in the villages and winning a medal for bravery for the rescue of fellow men under fire. Twice wounded in action, he came back to a country that cared little for its returning vets. Stone wandered aimlessly down the coast to Mexico and was busted for carrying pot at the U.S. border. Alienated and angry, Stone returned to New York, entered film school, and began writing scripts.

Riordan details Stone’s struggles in writing Platoon and trying to get it financed, as well as the failure of his first marriage and move to Los Angeles, where he began to enjoy more success as a screenwriter. But it was winning the Oscar for his Midnight Express script that launched his career; suddenly he was plunged into a sybaritic life of parties, women, and excesses of every kind. Stone describes meeting his second wife, and their decision to flee to Paris so that he could wean himself off drugs. During the writing of Scarface, his “swan song to cocaine,” Stone quit cold.

His return to the U.S. and incredible fight to film Salvador, including convincing Salvadorean officials that the film was pro-government, is all here – as well as the making of Platoon, and how Stone put actors Charlie Sheen and others through a grueling boot camp replicating his own experiences in Vietnam. Stone describes directing Michael Douglas in Wall Street, and how he pushed Tom Cruise to the limits in Born on the Fourth of July. The bizarre madness that powered the making of The Doors, and the strange events surrounding the filming of JFK, from stolen scripts to life-threatening letters, are told in depth for the first time. Continuing through Natural Born Killers; working with Juliette Lewis, Robert Downey, Jr., and Woody Harrelson; and including the break-up of Stone’s second marriage, James Riordan delves deep into the dark forces driving Stone. He shows us how Stone musters the manic energy to make film after film, becoming so involved in each project that he takes on its persona – for instance, developing a coterie of groupies during the filming of The Doors and gambling on stocks during Wall Street. An entertaining and at times shocking look at the country’s most-talked-about filmmaker, Stone gives us an intimate, behind-the-scenes look at the man, the rumors, and the bizarre yet brilliant process by which he creates his films.

JAMES RIORDAN is the author of Break on Through, the classic biography of Doors legend Jim Morrison, as well as The Platinum Rainbow and Making It in the New Music Business. His articles have been published in Rolling Stone, the Chicago Daily News, and many other publications. Riordan lives in the suburbs of Chicago with his wife and children.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 573 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 1.040 g (36,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Hyperion, New York, New York, 1995 – ISBN 0-7868-6026-X

Stories I Only Tell My Friends: An Autobiography (Rob Lowe)

Lowe, Rob - Stories I Only Tell My FriendsA teen idol at fifteen, an international icon and founding member of the Brat Pack at twenty, and one of Hollywood’s top stars to this day; Rob Lowe has spent almost his entire life in the public eye. Now, in this wryly funny and moving memoir, every word of which he wrote  himself, Rob chronicles his experiences as a painfully misunderstood child actor from Ohio who was uprooted to the wild counterculture of  mid-seventies Malibu, where he embarked on his unrelenting pursuit of a career in Hollywood. The Outsiders placed Rob at the birth of the modern youth movement in the entertainment industry. During his time on The West Wing, he witnessed the surreal nexus of show business and politics both on the set and in the actual White House. And Rob tells unforgettable stories of the years in between, of the wild excesses that marked the eighties and led to his quest for family and sobriety. No other actor could write about this era in Hollywood with such wit, candor, and depth. Never mean-spirited or salacious, he delivers unexpected glimpses into his successes, disappointments, relationships, and one-of-a-kind encounters with people who shaped our world over the last twenty-five years.

A major publishing event, Stories I Only Tell My Friends joins the ranks of classic showbiz memoirs like Brooke Haywards Haywire and David Niven’s The Moon’s a Balloon.

ROB LOWE is a film, television, and theater actor, a producer, and an entrepreneur. He also is involved in polities. He lives with his wife and two sons in California.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 396 pp., index – Dimensions 21,5 x 14,5 cm (8,5 x 5,7 inch) – Weight 669 g (23,6 oz) – PUBLISHER Doubleday & Company, Inc., Garden City, New York, 1979 ISBN 978-0-8050-9329-2

sTORI Telling (Tori Spelling, with Hilary Liftin)

Autographed copy Tori Spelling xx

Spelling, Tori - sTORI TELLINGShe was television’s most famous virgin – and, as Aaron Spelling’s daughter, arguably its most famous case of nepotism. Portraying Donna Martin on Beverly Hills, 90210, Tori Spelling became one of the most recognizable young actresses of her generation, with a not-so-private personal life every bit as fascinating as her character’s exploits. Yet years later the name Tori Spelling too often closed – and sometimes slammed – the same doors it had opened.

sTORI telling is Tori’s chance to finally tell her side of the tabloid-worthy life she’s led, and she talks about it all: her decadent childhood birthday parties, her nose job, her fairy-tale wedding to the wrong man, her so-called feud with her mother. Tori has already revealed her flair for brilliant, self-effacing satire on her VH1 show So NoTORIous and Oxygen’s Tori & Dean: Inn Love, but her memoir goes deeper, into the real life behind the rumors: her complicated relationship with her parents. her struggles as an actress after 90210; her accident-prone love life; and, ultimately, her quest to define herself on her own terms.

From her over-the-top first wedding to finding new love to her much-publicized – and misunderstood – “disinheritance,” sTORI telling is a juicy, eye-opening, enthralling look at what it really means to be Tori Spelling.

TORI SPELLING is an actress whose career spans theater, television, and film. She’s received critical praise for her work in such independent films as Trick and The House of Yes. Recently she both starred in and executive produced the comedy series So NoTORIous on VH1 and the popular reality series Tori & Dean: Inn Love on Oxygen. She lives with her husband, Dean McDermott, and son, Liam, in Los Angeles.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 276 pp. – Dimensions 23,5 x 15,5 cm (9,3 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 482 g (17 oz) – PUBLISHER Simon Spotlight Entertainment, New York, New York, 2008 – ISBN 978-1-4169-5073-8

Stormy Weather: The Life of Lena Horne (James Gavin)

gavin-james-stormy-weather-the-life-of-lena-horneAt the 2002 Academy Awards, Halle Berry thanked Lena Horne for paving the way for her to become the first black recipient of a Best Actress Oscar. This was a fitting acknowledgment to Horne, who broke down racial barriers in the entertainment industry in the 1940s and 50s even as she was limited mostly to guest singing appearances in splashy Hollywood musicals. Now James Gavin, author of Deep in a Dream: The Long Night of Chet Baker, draws on a wealth of unmined material and hundreds of interviews – one of them with Horne herself – to give us the defining portrait of an American icon.

Gavin has probed more deeply than any other writer into the celebrity who has lived in reclusion since 2000. Incorporating insights from the likes of Ruby Dee, Tony Bennett, Diahann Carroll, Bobby Short, and several of Horne’s fellow chorines from Harlem’s Cotton Club, Stormy Weather pulls back curtain after curtain to reveal the many faces of this luminous, strong-willed, passionate, even tragic woman – a stunning talent who inspired such giants of show business as Barbra Streisand, Eartha Kitt, and Aretha Franklin.

From the Cotton Club’s golden era and the back lots of Hollywood’s biggest studios to the glitz Vegas’s heyday, this encompassing account of an African-American icon is as much a story of the American experience in the twentieth century as it is a masterful, groundbreaking biography.

JAMES GAVIN has written about some of the most significant musical figures of our time, including Nina Simone, Peggy Lee, Annie Lennox, and Miriam Makeba. He is the author of Deep in a Dream: The Long Night of Chet Baker and Intimate Nights: The Golden Age of New York Cabaret. His work has appeared in The New York Times, Vanity Fair, and Time Out New York. He lives in New York City.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 598 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 857 g (30,2 oz) – PUBLISHER Atria Books, New York, New York, 2009 – ISBN 978-0-7432-7143-1

The Story of Cinema, An Illustrated History, Volume 2: From Citizen Kane to the Present Day (David Shipman)

shipman-david-the-story-of-cinemaThe second and concluding volume of David Shipman’s magisterial history of world cinema opens with Orson Welles’s Citizen Kane, first released in 1941, and ends with such blockbusting movies as Ghandi and E.T.

In starting this second volume with Citizen Kane, Shipman notes that the Hollywood factory system of filmmaking was beginning to give way to the individual filmmaker; in Hollywood, for the first time since the silent days, Frank Capra excepted, directors like Orson Welles, Preston Sturges, Billy Wilder and Alfred Hitchcock were making films recognizably theirs. After examining the British and the American films made to entertain audiences during the Second World War, Shipman returns to this theme, and studies the rise to prominence of directors like Elia Kazan, Joseph L. Mankiewicz, Fred Zinnemann and Vincente Minnelli, as well as old masters such as William Wyler, John Ford and George Cukor. He takes us to the present day, from Stanley Kubrick, Sidney Lumet, Martin Ritt and Arthur Penn to today’s so-called ‘movie brats,’ while not forgetting the important studio films made by less distinguished directors; and covers the breakdown of the accepted standards of morality and the screen’s new permissiveness.

Apart from the British contribution to the war effort, the book looks at the British film industry’s surge of creative activity as the War ended, followed by the slump of the 1950s and the Woodfall revival at the beginning of the 1960s, together with Hollywood’s annexation of such talents as David Lean, Carol Reed and John Schlesinger. The French and Italian cinemas are examined with reference to their great periods, the nouvelle vague in France and new-realism in Italy; there are separate chapters on such major figures as Nicholas Ray, Luis Buñuel and Ingmar Bergman, together with recognition of the renaissance of the German cinema and Australia’s fine new industry.

The book is not intended to be comprehensive for, like Volume 1, it deals only with these films which have received wide distribution – though, as Shipman says, there are some neglected films which any historian must take into account. As in his first volume, he makes a number of major discoveries, and the two books together provide a history of the cinema that should prove indispensable for years to come.

DAVID SHIPMAN has been working on the present history for almost a decade, and The Story of Cinema, Volume 1: From Beginnings to Gone With the Wind, published in October 1982, met with immediate praise for its scholarly and comprehensive treatment, as well as delight at Shipman’s lucid and witty  prose.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 1.280 pp., index – Dimensions 25,5 x 18,5 cm (10 x 7,3 inch) – Weight 2.165 g (76,4 oz) – PUBLISHER Hodder and Soughton, London, 1984 – ISBN 0 340 28259 2

The Story of Film (Mark Cousins)

cousins-mark-the-story-of-filmThe Story of Film presents the history of the movies in a way never told before. Mark Cousins’ narrative takes a chronological journey through the history of film worldwide. It is a story told from the point of view of filmmakers and moviegoers themselves. Weaving personalities, film technology, and production with engaging descriptions of ground-breaking scenes, Cousins uses his experience as film historian, producer, and director to capture the shifting trends of movie history without recourse to jargon. We learn how filmmakers influenced each other, how contemporary events influenced them, and how they challenged established techniques and developed new technologies to enhance their medium.

Four hundred striking images and rare freeze frames reinforce the reader’s understanding of cinematic innovation both stylistic and technical. The images reveal astonishing parallels in global filmmaking, thus introducing the less familiar worlds of African, Asian, and Middle Eastern cinema, as well as documenting the fortunes of the best Western directors.

The Story of Film presents three epochs: Silent (1885-1928), Sound (1928-1990), and Digital (1990-present), spanning the birth of the moving image, the establishment of Hollywood, the European avant-garde movements, personal filmmaking, world cinema, and recent phenomena such as Computer Generated Imagery (CGI) and the ever-more “real” realizations of the wildest of imaginations.

Here are mainstream entertainment films and maverick talents, breathtaking moments and technical revolutions, blockbuster movies and art-house gems, icons of the screen and the hard workers behind the scenes. It is a powerful story; it is the story of what has become today the world’s most popular artistic medium.

MARC COUSINS is an author, film critic, producer, and documentary director. He is Honorary Lecturer in Film and Media Studies at the University of Stirling and teaches the Aesthetics of World Cinema at Edinburgh College of Art. As director of the Edinburgh International Film Festival in the 1990s, he pioneered the Scene by Scene discussion format, later adapting it into a celebrated BBC television series and book of the same name. Among those who gave career interviews were Martin Scorsese, Roman Polanski, Woody Allen, Shohei Imamura, Bernardo Bertolucci, Jeanne Moreau, Kirk Douglas and the Coen brothers. The subjects of his documentary films have included neo-Nazis, the first Gulf War, and Mikhail Gorbachev. His other publications include the acclaimed Imagining Reality: The Faber Book of Documentary and an introduction to the screenplay of Billy Wilder’s The Apartment. Cousins is a regular contributor to Sight and Sound, Prospect and The Times. His production credits, through his company 4Way Pictures, include Irvine Welsh’s first original screenplay Meat Trade and Sylvain Chomet’s follow-up to the Oscar-nominated Les Triplettes de Belleville, and co-producing John Sayles’ Jaimie MacGillivray, starring Robert Carlyle.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 512 pp., index – Dimensions 24,5 x 16,5 cm (9,7 x 6,5 inch) – Weight 1.585 g (55,9 oz) – PUBLISHER Thunder Mouth’s Press, New York, New York, 2004 – ISBN 1-56025-612-5

Straight from the Horse’s Mouth: Ronald Neame, an Autobiography (Ronald Neame with Barbara Roisman Cooper; foreword by Michael Caine)

Neame, Ronald - Straight from te Horse's MouthStraight from the Horse’s Mouth provides a fascinating, firsthand account of the life and times of Ronald Neame, who began his career as assistant cameraman on Hitchcock’s first talkie, Blackmail, and went on to direct Maggie Smith, Judy Garland, Walter Matthau, and other well-known actors. It includes tales of on- and off-set antics of comedian George Formby, Neame’s first-person account of working with Noël Coward and David Lean, and many other equally exciting episodes in the life of this beloved filmmaker.

RONALD NEAME has enjoyed an unparalleled career in the film industry, beginning as an assistant cameraman in his native England in the 1920s. He became a director of photography with such major motion pictures as Major BarbaraIn Which We Serve, and Blithe Spirit, and later graduated to producer and director of Take My Wife, The Golden Salamander, The Card, The Man Who Never Was, and some twenty other feature films.

BARBARA ROISMAN COOPER worked as a television production manager and taught film studies, and upon her retirement became a freelance writer. She specializes in creating celebrity profiles for various publications, including British Heritage, Biblio Magazine, and Modern Maturity.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 296 pp., index – Dimensions 22 x 14,5 cm (8,7 x 5,7 inch) – Weight 588 g (20,7 oz) – PUBLISHER The Scarecrow Pres, Inc., Lanham, Maryland, 2003 – ISBN 0-8108-4490-7

Straight Shooting (Robert Stack, with Mark Evans)

stack-robert-straight-shootingStraight Shooting is a wry, amusing, affectionate look at Hollywood over the years – the public drama and private feuds, the tyrannical reigns of the big studio bosses, the larger-than-life exploits of the big male stars – and what it is like to be part of that world for Robert Stack.

From coast to coast, people know Stack for his Emmy Award-winning performance in TV’s The Untouchables and for memorable films like The High and the Mighty and Written on the Wind. Few, however, know the other roles this hard-working actor has excelled in over the years: son, husband, father, friend to some of Hollywood’s most admired stars, and a consummate sportsman whose skill in skeet shooting (he was National Skeet Shooting Champion at seventeen and is a member of the Skeet Shooting Hall of Fame) brought him many happy hours in the company of celebrities like Howard Hughes, Fredric March, and Robert Taylor, to name only a few.

Stack is the son of a dazzling California socialite (she was a member of the Valentino wedding party) and an advertising giant (the man responsible for slogans like “The beer that made Milwaukee famous”). Among their friends, the elder Stacks numbered Carole Lombard, Nelson Eddy, Ezio Pinza, Edward G. Robinson, Will Rogers, and many others – lovingly described by the actor as he remembers them from his adolescent and teenage years.

Each step in Stack’s career brought him in contact with fascinating people who became legends: Judy Garland – friends hoped there would be a romance between them, but Judy’s heart belonged to Artie Shaw; Elizabeth Taylor – at fifteen, Liz had a schoolgirl crush on Stack during the filming of A Date with Judy: Deanna Durbin – Stack’s first screen kiss was supposed to be with Durbin, but the studio shot it so that Stack played his big love scene opposite a blackboard; Errol Flynn – a prankster who once left a dead snake amid the lingerie of his beautiful co-star. Says Stack, “Olivia de Havilland was not amused.” Clark Gable – the man’s man whom everyone thought him to be, and the friend who gave Stack a serious lecture on how to be a pro, a real actor, not just a “star”; Carole Lombard – Stack’s toughest acting job was being her lover in To Be or Not to Be with Clark Gable on the set; John F. Kennedy – the apartment they shared was filled with the prettiest girls in town.

Story after story rolls by, each more memorable than the last, told with unceasing admiration for the personal style these stars projected and the often profound effect many of them had upon Stack’s life.

The Untouchables years are depicted with wonderful candor as Stack recalls the many fine co-stars and hilarious behind-the-scene episodes accompanying the show. In addition there are cameo appearances by luminaries Ernst Lubitsch, Betty Grable, W.C. Fields, the Ritz Brothers, Joe Pasternak, “Archie Bunker,” and Lauren Bacall, to make this a rich, engrossing reading experience.

Like David Niven’s delightful autobiography The Moon’s a Balloon, Straight Shooting is filled with good feeling, friendship, and a sense of a job well-done – as is Stack’s own career and life. Through it all, Robert Stack emerges on target, a straight-shooter in every sense of the word.

MARK EVANS, author of Soundtrack: The Music of the Movies and Scott Joplin and the Ragtime Years, is also a composer, lyricist, playwright, and host of the radio show Mark My Words.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 292 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 758 g (26,7 oz) – PUBLISHER Macmillan Publishing Co., Inc., New York, New York, 1980 – ISBN 0-02-613320-2

Strangers in Paradise: The Hollywood Émigrés, 1933-1950 (John Russell Taylor)

Taylor, John Russell - Strangers in ParadiseBefore the smog, Los Angeles represented a sunny, carefree paradise where the living was easy for generations of Americans who followed Horace Greeley’s advice to “Go West, young man!” Its appeal was even more intense in the 1930s to Europeans with more urgent reasons to look westward. From the time of Hitler’s coming to power in 1933, there was a steady stream of liberal and Jewish Germans – among them the cream of intelligentsia – who needed a rallying point to build a New Weimar and preserve German culture from the holocaust. Los Angeles filled the bill, and as Nazi Germany gradually overran the rest of Europe, the stream of émigrés became a flood: Austrians, Czechs, French, Scandinavians, British all tended to find themselves temporarily or permanently marooned in Southern California.

John Russell Taylor, biographer of one of the most distinguished émigrés, Alfred Hitchcock, chronicles in his new book the varied fortunes of this varied group. Not only did such leading figures of the world cinema as Hitchcock, Fritz Lang, Jean Renoir and Luis Buñuel all come to Hollywood to work – as best they could in these alien surroundings – but Los Angeles, alleged cultural desert, also offered a home to such writers as Thomas Mann, Aldous Huxley, Franz Werfel, Christopher Isherwood, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry and Bertold Brecht and such composers as Schoenberg and Stravinsky, as well as a host of designers, actors and musicians. The story of how they came to terms (or did not) with their new environment, the Americans and one another is frequently bizarre, often funny and sometimes tragic. It is also a long overdue account of an important, neglected, imperfectly understood episode in the cultural history of twentieth-century America.

JOHN RUSSELL TAYLOR is film reviewer for The Times in London. He also writes for The Connoisseur and other periodicals. Of Hitch, his biography of Alfred Hitchcock, Sheridan Morley wrote, “It will be hard to find a better tribute to a remarkable career than the one that is Mr. Taylor’s book.”

Hardcover, dust jacket – 256 pp., index – Dimensions 21,5 x 14,5 cm (8,5 x 5,7 inch) – Weight 401 g (14,1 oz) – PUBLISHER Holt, Rinehart and Winston, New York, New York, 1983 – ISBN 0-03-061944-0

Streisand: A Biography (Anne Edwards)

Edwards, Anne - Streisand, a BiographyBarbra Streisand. No star has more devoted fans – or more vociferous detractors. She is an icon, an idol, a legend. Yet, despite all that has been written about her, the real Barbra Streisand has remained elusive. Until now.

Streisand tells the story-behind-the-story for the first time, revealing the inner demons that have driven her career – and shaped her tumultuous personal life. Written by a Hollywood insider and based on interviews with more than 140 of Streisand’s friends, family, lovers, associates, and enemies – many of whom go on the record for the first time – Streisand takes you on a revelatory journey from her Brooklyn beginnings to the controversies surrounding her latest movie, The Mirror Has Two Faces.

In between, we come to know Barbra Streisand as never before. We enter her world of childhood angst, of unprecedented youthful ambition and glittering Broadway stardom at twenty-two. We learn what went into her extraordinary success as singer, screen  actor, and director – and what went on in her tempestuous private life, from her first bruising teenage affair to her marriage to Elliott Gould and her romances with Omar Sharif, Jon Peters, Pierre Trudeau, Don Johnson, James Brolin, and others. We are given moving insight into her relationship with her only son, Jason, and her acceptance of his gay lifestyle; her complicated feelings toward her mother; her unusual and deeply felt connection to her goddaughter, Caleigh – the daughter she never had – and the lowdown on her high-profile political activism. Above all, we come to understand as never before the unique blend of talent, vulnerability, passion, and ambition that has made Barbra Streisand the enduring, fascinating star she is.

ANNE EDWARDS co-wrote the first-draft screenplay for Funny Girl. She is renowned for her best-selling biographies of celebrities, including those of Vivien Leigh, Judy Garland, and Katharine Hepburn. She and her husband, composer-musicologist Stephen Citron, live in Connecticut.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 123 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 938 g (33,1 oz) – PUBLISHER Little, Brown & Company, 1997 – ISBN 0-316-21138-9

Streisand: The Woman and the Legend (James Spada)

Spada, james - Streisnad The Woman and The LegendIn 1968, for the first time in the history of the Academy Awards, two Oscars were awarded for Best Actress in a Major Motion Picture: one went to Katharine Hepburn for The Lion in Winter, and the other to 25-year-old Barbra Streisand for Funny Girl.

Since then her acting, singing and songwriting talents have won her a second Oscar, two Emmies, six Grammies, eight Golden Globes and a Tony Award. Her films consistently earn millions of dollars worldwide, and her recent album Guilty sold a staggering 20 million copies and was number one in twelve countries.

Her private life has been equally dramatic: her name has been romantically linked with Omar Sharif, Ryan O’Neal and Pierre Trudeau; Elliott Gould is her ex-husband; and for the past eight years she has been living with Jon Peters.

In this warm tribute, James Spada chronicles Streisand’s life in four acts – Starting Out, 1942-63; Elegance, 1964-9; The Experimental Years, 1970-5; and Acclaim and Controversy, 1975-81 – and recounts many behind-the-scenes stories as told to him first-hand by the likes of Robert Redford, Garson Kanin and Vincente Minnelli, and many other friends and associates of this supremely gifted woman.

An intimate portrait of the life and career of a glittering personality, Streisand: The Woman and the Legend combines fascinating text with quality photographs to tell the personal and professional story of one of the world’s most popular entertainers. As visually arresting as the star herself, Streisand is a vivid biography with facts, insights and photographs never before published – an absolute must for Streisand fans.

JAMES SPADA is a freelance writer who has contributed to many papers and magazines, including the Los Angeles Times and the London Daily Mirror. He is the author of Barbra: The First Decade, published in 1974, and The Films of Robert Redford, an authorised biography published in 1977. Mr Spada lives in Los Angeles, where he runs his own magazine publishing company.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 250 pp. – Dimensions 28,5 x 21,5 cm (11,2 x 8,5 inch) – Weight 1.250 g (44,0 oz) – PUBLISHER W. H. Allen & Co, Ltd., London, 1982 – ISBN 0 491 02906 3

Stroheim (Arthur Lenning)

lenning-arthur-stroheimErich von Stroheim (1885-1957) was one of the true giants in American film history. Stubborn, arrogant, and colorful, he saw himself as a cinema artist, which led to numerous conflicts with producers and studio executives who complained about the inflated budgets and extraordinary length of his films. Stroheim achieved great notoriety and success, but he was so uncompromising that he turned his triumph into failure. He was banned from ever directing again and spent the remainder of his life as an actor.

For years Stroheim’s life has been wreathed in myths, many of his own devising. Arthur Lennig scoured European and American archives for details concerning the life of the actor and director, and he counters several long-accepted and oft-repeated claims. Stroheim’s tales of military experience are almost completely fictitious; the “von” in his name was an affectation adopted at Ellis Island in 1909; and, counter to his own claim, he did not participate in the production of The Birth the Nation in 1914.

Wherever Stroheim lived, he was an outsider: a Jew in Vienna, an Austrian in southern California, an American in France. This contributed to an almost pathological need to embellish and obscure his past; yet, it also may have been the key to his genius both behind and in front of the camera. He had a fantastic dedication to absolute cinematic truth and believed that his vision and genius would triumph over the Hollywood system.

As an actor, Stroheim threw himself into his portrayals of evil men, relishing his epithet, “The Man You Love to Hate.” As a director, he immersed himself in every facet of production, including scriptwriting and costume design. In 1923 he created his masterpiece Greed, infamous for its eight-hour running time. The studio cut the film to two hours and burned the extra footage. Stroheim returned to acting, saving some of his finest performances for La Grande Illusion (1937) and Billy Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard (1950), a role he hated, probably because it was too similar to the story of his own life.

ARTHUR LENNING, an emeritus professor of cinema at the University of Albany, is the author of The Count: The Life and Films of Bela Lugosi. He also has reconstructed Stroheim’s original version of Foolish Wives (1922).

Hardcover, dust jacket – 514 pp., index – Dimensions 23 x 15,5 cm (9,1 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 970 g (34,2 oz) – PUBLISHER The University Press of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 2000 – ISBN 0-8131-2138-8

Studio Affairs: My Life as a Film Director (Vincent Sherman)

Autographed copy 4/8/99 To Leo Verswijver, Good talking to you. Best wishes, Vincent Sherman

sherman-vincent-studio-affairsAs a young Jewish boy growing up in Vienna, Georgia, Abe Orovitz could never have predicted the twists and turns his life would take. Many years later, as a retired film director with more than thirty movies to his credit, Vincent Sherman is no less surprised when he looks back on that life. In Studio Affairs he retraces his life with candor and enthusiasm.

Sherman relates the events of his days directly and honestly. He candidly discusses the details of his three-year relationship with Joan Crawford, his inadvertent connection with the death of Bette Davis’s second husband, and his poignant romantic involvement with Rita Hayworth. Providing counterpoint to these liaisons is the love and devotion of Sherman’s wife, Hedda, who accepted her husband’s occasional infidelities as part and parcel of his career.

The heart of Studio Affairs provides an inside look at the motion picture industry during the heyday of the studio system by one who worked his way from nearly starving actor and playwright to respected director. Drawing examples from his long career, Sherman discusses how he reworked flawed scripts, elicited strong performances from sometimes limited actors, placated his superiors and big-name talent, and won the support of his crews.

In effect, the book serves as a primer on the art of film directing. Sherman quickly developed a reputation of being a consummate rewrite artist – able to take whatever assignment given him and turn it into a first rate motion picture. His skill at reworked scripts led him to bigger and bigger projects, even as the salary set by his long-term contract with Warner Brothers remained below that of most of his colleagues. Though not originally signed to direct, when asked to do so he drew on his experience putting together productions at summer camps across the “borscht circuit” in upstate New York.

Like so many talented individuals in Hollywood during the 1950s, Sherman was targeted by the House Un-American Activities Committee, owing in part to his active support of the WPA Theatre project in New York two decades previous. Time spent on the lesser-known gray list kept him out of work for several years. Eventually, he again enjoyed some critical success, but after the demise of the studio system life was never quite the same. The quintessential “studio director” ended his career directing for television. Vincent Sherman’s path from Georgia to southern California is compelling, and his legendary talent for good storytelling makes the book impossible to put down.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 328 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 15,5 cm (9,3 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 774 g (27,3 oz) – PUBLISHER The University Press of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 1996 – ISBN 0-8131-1975-8

Sun and Shadow: An Autobiography (Jean-Pierre Aumont; foreword by François Truffaut; originally titled Le Soleil et les Ombres)

Autographed copy Jean-Pierre Aumont

Aumont, Jean-Pierre - Sun and Shadow“Sun and Shadow is a fascinating account of Jean-Pierre Aumont’s life, his work as an actor, his travels, and his loves. One of the most refreshing aspects of the book is that there is not the slightest attempt on the part of the author of glorify his public image… The enjoyment is infectious… Aumont’s memoirs generate laughter through a spontaneous, true-to-life brand of humor.” – From The Foreword by François Truffaut.

“I was born at the age of sixteen,” writes Jean-Pierre Aumont. “Is there any other birth for an actor than the first day he finds himself standing in the wings of a theater?” To this book of memoirs the author brings the same qualities that have made him a star in France, on Broadway, and in Hollywood: vitality, a relaxed humor, and a sense of joy that is the secret ingredient of youth.

What a career it has been: from the early success in Paris, where he originated the role of Oedipus in Cocteau’s La machine infernale; to the Hollywood of Charlie Chaplin, Greta Garbo, and Cole Porter; to more recent roles in plays by Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller, in Truffaut’s Day for Night, and with Diana Ross in Mahogany. On almost every page of the book there are warm, humorous anecdotes about his co-stars and personal friends: Melina Mercouri, Rex Harrison, the Kennedys, Arthur Rubenstein, Catherine Deneuve, Laurence Olivier, Colette, Marlene Dietrich, and Grace Kelly.

And yet this is more than just a book of actor’s reminiscences, for Jean-Pierre Aumont is an author and playwright too, and his personal life has had its own darker moments. In 1943, he cut short his budding Hollywood career to join the Free French forces, and was decorated for his service in the Liberation of France, during which many of his close friends were killed. There was the sudden death of his first wife, Maria Montez, and the tragic, final breakdown of Vivien Leigh, his co-star in Tovarich.

How does one explain the richness, the resonances of this account? The author is writing of his life from the vantage point of age and experience, and yet at every turn he discovers “the ghost of my younger self in the shadows, that awed beginner I was once, still am, and hope always to remain.”

Hardcover, dust jacket – 315 pp., index – Dimensions 21,5 x 14 cm (8,5 x 5,5 inch) – Weight 547 g (19,3 oz) – PUBLISHER W. W. Norton & Company, Inc., New York, New York, 1977 – ISBN 0-393-07511-5

Sunkissed: Sunwear and the Hollywood Beauty 1930-1950 (Joshua James Curtis; foreword by Ann Rutherford)

curtis-joshua-james-sunkissedSwimwear has always been at the forefront of fashion and intrigue, and between the covers of Sunkissed you will find the bathing beauties of the Golden Age of Hollywood who shaped the designs and future of beachwear. Perfectly preserved in print, the women of Sunkissed are the stars and models that fueled America’s beach-bound desires. Uncover the history of the stars and models that showcased their swimwear before the eager eyes of the world. Find out who these women were once they stepped away from the camera and out of their sun suits. Surf alongside then through their careers as you discover the truth of their not so ordinary lives.

As you turn through the pages of this one-of-a-kind collection, enjoy the camera shots and vivid publicity photos of the women who created the template for modern grace and beauty. Sunkissed reveals the beachwear that was the first to break the mold and boldly declare that less is more!

JOSHUA CURTIS is a native Californian, who among his many talents is a photographer, portrait artist, and technical advisor. His WW II photo collection is among the finest private collections in the country, which several publications have derived their material. Joshua’s collection of the 1930s and 1940s memorabilia has been featured on A&E, The Los Angeles Times, and other periodicals across the United States. Collecting oral histories from WW II veterans and actors and actresses, he is planning to have a museum to house the oratories and memorabilia. Actress Gloria DeHaven states: “What Josh does and how he does it is an absolute miracle! It’s outstanding… and great that any one person can have a genuine love and feeling for the time – the forties. It’s an amazing, amazing quality because it’s all so real. He really loves that time and anyone who meets him is filled with the joy of the period. For someone who has actually been in that time and lived in it, to meet someone his age – a baby, it’s just so amazing to me that I can say that he knows so much, probably more than I do about my time.”

Hardcover, dust jacket – 160 pp., index – Dimensions 27,5 x 23,5 cm (10,8 x 9,3 inch) – Weight 957 g (33,8 oz) – PUBLISHER Collector’s Press, Inc., Portland, Oregon, 2003 – ISBN 1-888054-77-8

Sunshine and Shadow: An Autobiography (Mary Pickford; introduction by Cecil B. DeMille)

pickford-mary-sunshine-and-shadowBaby Gladys Smith was twelve when David Belasco rechristened her Mary Pickford. By that time she was already a seasoned trouper with four years of stock-company experience, and she seemed destined to become one of the great stars of the New York theater.

But also in New York at that time were the studios of the fledgling Biograph Company. Here a dynamic young director named D.W. Griffith persuaded Mary to put in a day’s work for him. The picture: Pippa Passes. The pay: five dollars. The rest is motion-picture history.

There is much more than the history of motion pictures wrapped up in the career of America’s Sweetheart. Here, for the first time, she tells the intensely personal and moving story of her life… her devotion to her mother, sister, and brother, and their early struggles in Toronto and on the road… her unfortunate marriage with Owen Moore… her rise to fame in Hollywood… her storybook life with Douglas Fairbanks and its tragic final chapter… her happiness today as the wife of Charles ‘Buddy’ Rogers. Throughout the story she speaks candidly about people who have been part of her life – Charlie Chaplin, Dorothy Gish, Lillian Gish, Cecil B. DeMille, Adolph Zukor, Frances Marion – to name a few. It has been a full, exciting, and productive life, and Mary Pickford writes of it with warmth and charm.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 224 pp. – Dimensions 21,5 x 14 cm (8,5 x 5,5 inch) – Weight 394 g (13,9 oz) – PUBLISHER Doubleday & Company, Inc., Garden City, New York, 1955

Surviving Myself (Jennifer O’Neill)

Autographed copy To Ruthie X 🙂 Jennifer O’Neill

O'Neill, Jennifer - Surviving MyselfJennifer O’Neill knows all there is to know about fame and despair. Even before she skyrocketed to movie stardom at age twenty-two, she had experienced more than most women twice her age: international modeling at fifteen, marriage at seventeen, and motherhood at nineteen. Hurtling through a seductive world of glamour, money, and travel at a breakneck speed, Jennifer went on to capture hearts with her coveted role in Summer of ’42.

Her career was a dream come true. Her private nightmare had just begun. In her relentless search for love, the dark years that followed saw scandal and sorrow offset by her exceptional beauty and style as she struggled through the trauma of eight marriages, nine miscarriages, a near-fatal gunshot wound, and three other near-death experiences. Even motherhood proved a painful trial when one of her husbands sexually abused her oldest child, Aimee.

But Jennifer O’Neill is a survivor – with the grace of God. Now, with renewed optimism, she looks back on the roller coaster of her past with an unsparing honesty tempered with compassion, humor, and insight. Her story is an unforgettable drama of a beautiful, talented, whimsical, yet deeply troubled woman redeemed in the end by the gift of her spiritual awakening and her restored faith in the resiliency of the human spirit.

JENNIFER O’NEILL starred in the classic film Summer of ‘42, turned our heads as Cover Girl’s spokeswoman, and today continues to have a successful acting career, with more than thirty feature films, Movies of the Week, and network series to her credit. Between filming, Jennifer enjoys her family and pursues her lifelong passion for horses on her farm in Nashville, Tennessee.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 238 pp. – Dimensions 24 x 15,5 cm (9,5 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 524 g (18,5 oz) – PUBLISHER William Morrow & Company, Inc., New York, New York, 1999 – ISBN  0-688-15992-3

Survivor (Christina Crawford)

Crawford, Christina - SurvivorSurvivor begins, in more ways than one, where Christina Crawford’s remarkable best-seller, Mommie Dearest, left off. In this new work, she recreates her long night’s journey from anger and chaos to the peace of an inner awakening – ten controversial years that have seen her at the forefront of extraordinary changes in her own and society’s consciousness, ten years during which she rode the roller coaster from the heights of success to the near-fatal depths of physical and emotional disaster to her serene and fulfilled present.

Survivor is an intensely personal interior landscape chronicling one woman’s journey through the unknown, searching for the elements of personal transformation to discover hope and the ability to love and a deep sense of belonging.

It is an inspiring passage, but not an easy one. Here are the joys of her marriage to a Hollywood producer and the strains both she and her marriage underwent during the instant celebrity of Mommie Dearest, stresses so great that they contributed to a near-death experience as a result of a massive stroke in 1981, from which she was not expected to recover. “I knew,” she writes, “that I had to find a new way of being in the world.”

Just as she recovers physically, her marriage ends and her journey then becomes a searing spiritual quest through a variety of New Age processes: past-life regression, the study of shamanism and metaphysics, and intense meditation at Sedona in the Arizona desert. But it is not until Ms. Crawford comes to terms with her lost “inner child” that she discovers the key that unlocks her past. By accepting the green-eyed, silver-haired child too long denied, she finds the strength to look beyond the past to a future with a renewed sense of herself and life’s infinite possibilities.

Survivor, then, is a testament of personal courage, an offering of a better way to all willing to risk the journey.

CHRISTINA CRAWFORD, in addition to being an internationally recognized author, is a businesswoman, a writer-producer for stage and film and a consultant and nationwide lecturer on the subject of family violence and child abuse. She attended Carnegie-Mellon University, graduated from UCLA and earned a masters degree in communications at the University of Southern California. She has also served as Commissioner of Children’s Services for the County of Los Angeles, where she makes her home.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 268 pp. – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,5 x 6,3 inch) – Weight 662 g (23,3 oz) – PUBLISHER Donald I. Fine, Inc., New York, New York, 1988 – ISBN 1-55611-118-5

Swanson on Swanson: An Autobiography (Gloria Swanson)

Autographed copy To Edwin, Greetings, Gloria Swanson, 1981

Swanson, Gloria - Swanson on SwansonNow, for the first time, she tells the story of her life, from the early Mack Sennett one-reelers, through her years of spectacular stardom and her several marriages.

Throughout the 1920s Gloria Swanson was the inspirational ideal of feminine sophistication, the supreme film star.

As a young girl Gloria Swanson came under the tutelage of Cecil B. DeMille, and by her early twenties had become, along with Charlie Chaplin and Mary Pickford, one of the world’s greatest stars, the idol of millions of fans everywhere and a symbol of the Babylonian splendours of a now vanished Hollywood.

Her teenage marriage to the actor Wallace Beery was a disaster; her second marriage was hardly better. But the tremendous strength of character that brought her to stardom also kept her there, and while her contemporaries fell victim to scandal and all the extravagant corruptions that the young Hollywood offered, she kept her head, despite the hysterical adulation that accompanied her wherever she went. By the time she was twenty-seven she was world famous and had turned down a Paramount contract for more than a million dollars a year. Instead she became her own producer at United Artists, and there she violated one of Hollywood’s strictest taboos by filming Somerset Maugham’s Rain, the outspoken story of a prostitute and the hypocritical manager who falls in love with her. Though the film was a gigantic success, it also ran well over budget. It was Joseph P. Kennedy, then a forty-year old Boston financier, who came to her rescue. In Swanson on Swanson she tells the story of their long-secret, three-year romance for the first time.

Surrounded in these early Hollywood years by Chaplin, Fairbanks, Pickford, Valentino and countless other stars, Gloria Swanson was also involved with the great producers of her day: Goldwyn, Lasky, Schenck and the other Hollywood moguls, and proved to be as tenacious as the best of them. She may have lived in a sea of champagne, but the sea was also filled with sharks. Glamour was everywhere – New York, Paris, Havana, London; there were Rolls-Royces by the dozen. Above all, she was and is every inch a woman: a feminist long before her time, she fought to win in one of the toughest worlds ever made. These are the memoirs of a great survivor, a great actress and a beautiful woman: the Hollywood story for all time.

GLORIA SWANSON lives in New York City with her husband and is active as an artist, a fashion designer, and – with this book – an author.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 535 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,3 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 1.145 g (40,4 oz) – PUBLISHER Michael Joseph, London, 1981 – ISBN 0 7181 1990 8

Swanson on Swanson: An Autobiography (Gloria Swanson)

Swanson, Gloria - Swanson on SwansonGloria Swanson, at eighty-one, in full possession of all of her many strengths, and now the sole survivor of a lifetime filled with such adventures that no novelist could begin to imagine it, tells her own story in her own words, and leaves nothing out. An army brat on posts in Key West and Puerto Rico, she was on the road to stardom from the moment when, at the age of fifteen, she paid a casual visit to a film studio on Chicago’s North Side. Then, in Los Angeles the next year, she found herself a second time, again almost by accident, before the cameras, this time with the slapstick genius Mack Sennett as her director. Soon she came under the tutelage of Cecil B. DeMille, and by her early twenties had become, along with Charlie Chaplin and Mary Pickford, one of the world’s greatest stars, the idol of millions of fans everywhere and a symbol of the Babylonian splendors of a now vanished Hollywood.

Her teenage marriage to the actor Wallace Beery was a disaster; her second marriage was hardly better. But the tremendous strength of character that brought her to stardom also kept her there, and while her contemporaries fell victim to scandal and all the extravagant corruptions that the young Hollywood offered, she kept her head, despite the hysterical adulation that accompanied her wherever she went. By the time she was twenty-seven she was world famous and had turned down a Paramount contract for more than a million dollars a year. Instead she became her own producer at United Artists, and there she violated one of Hollywood’s strictest taboos by filming Somerset Maugham’s Rain, the outspoken story of a prostitute and the hypocritical manager who falls in love with her. Though the film was a gigantic success, it also ran well over budget. It was Joseph P. Kennedy, then a forty-year old Boston financier, who came to her rescue. In Swanson on Swanson she tells the story of their long-secret, three-year romance for the first time.

Surrounded in these early Hollywood years by Chaplin, Fairbanks, Pickford, Valentino and countless other stars, Gloria Swanson was also involved with the great producers of her day: Goldwyn, Lasky, Schenck and the other Hollywood moguls, and proved to be as tenacious as the best of them. She may have lived in a sea of champagne, but the sea was also filled with sharks. Glamour was everywhere – New York, Paris, Havana, London; there were Rolls-Royces by the dozen. Above all, she was and is every inch a woman: a feminist long before her time, she fought to win in one of the toughest worlds ever made. These are the memoirs of a great survivor, a great actress and a beautiful woman: the Hollywood story for all time.

GLORIA SWANSON lives in New York City with her husband and is active as an artist, a fashion designer, and – with this book – an author.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 535 pp., index – Dimensions 24 x 16 cm (9,3 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 1.145 g (40,4 oz) – PUBLISHER Random House, New York, New York, 1980 – ISBN 0-394-50662-6

Symptoms of Withdrawal: A Memoir of Snapshots and Redemption (Christopher Kennedy Lawford)

Autographed copy Christopher Kennedy Lawford

Kennedy Lawford, Christopher - Symptoms of WithdrawalBorn into enormous privilege as well as burdened by  gut-wrenching family tragedy, Christopher Kennedy Lawford now shares his life story, offering a rare glimpse into the private worlds of the rich and famous of both Washington politics and the Hollywood elite. A triumphantly inspiring memoir, the first from a Kennedy family member since Rose Kennedy’s 1974 autobiography, Lawford’s Symptoms of Withdrawal tells the bittersweet truth about life inside America’s greatest family legacy.

As the firstborn child of famed Rat Pack actor Peter Lawford and Patricia Kennedy, sister to John F. Kennedy, Christopher Kennedy Lawford grew up with presidents and movie stars as close relatives and personal friends.

Lawford recalls Marilyn Monroe teaching him to dance the twist in his living room when he was still a toddler, being awakened late at night by his uncle Jack to hear him announce his candidacy for president, being perched atop a high-roller craps table in Las Vegas while Frank Sinatra and his Rat Pack swapped jokes and threw dice, and other treasured memories of his youth as part of America’s royal family.

In spite of this seemingly idyllic childhood, Lawford’s early life was marked by the traumatic assassinations of his beloved uncles Jack and Bobby, and he soon succumbed to the burgeoning drug scene of the 1970s during his teen years. With compelling realism mixed with equal doses of self-deprecating wit, youthful bravado, and hard-earned humility, Symptoms of Withdrawal chronicles Lawford’s deep and long descent into near-fatal drug and alcohol addiction, and his subsequent formidable path back to the sobriety he has preserved for the past twenty years.

Symptoms of Withdrawal is a poignantly honest portrayal of Lawford’s life as a Kennedy, a journey overflowing with hilarious insider anecdotes, heartbreaking accounts of Lawford’s addictions to narcotics as well as to celebrity and, ultimately, the redemption he found by asserting his own independence.

In this groundbreakingly courageous and exceptionally well-written memoir, Lawford steps forward to rise above the buried pain that first led to his addiction, and today lives mindfully by his time-tested mantra: “We are only as sick as the secrets we keep.” Symptoms of Withdrawal keeps no secrets and is a compelling testament to the power of truth.

CHRISTOPHER KENNEDY LAWFORD is an actor, writer, and activist in the substance abuse recovery movement who lives in Southern California.

Hardcover, dust jacket – 389 pp. – Dimensions 23,5 x 15,5 cm (9,3 x 6,1 inch) – Weight 767 g (27,1 oz) – PUBLISHER HarperCollins Publishers, New York, New York, 2005 – ISBN 978-0-06-073248-6

Sydney Pollack: A Critical Filmography (Janet L. Meyer)

meyer-janet-l-sydney-pollackJeremiah Johnson, The Way We Were, Absence of Malice, Out of Africa, Tootsie, The Firm, Searching for Bobby Fischer – Sydney Pollack has produced, directed or appeared in some of the biggest and most influential films of the last quarter century. His emergence in Hollywood coincided with those of such other innovative directors as John Frankenheimer, George Roy Hill and Sidney Lumet, and with them he helped develop a contemplative style of filmmaking that was almost European in its approach but retained its commercial viability.

Film-by-film, this work examines the directorial career of Sydney Pollack. One finds that his style is marked by deliberate pacing, ambiguous endings and metaphorical love stories. Topically, Pollack’s films reflect social, culture and political dilemmas that hold some fascination for him, with multidimensional characters in place that generally break the stereotypical molds of the situations. Pollack’s directing efforts on television are also detailed, as are his production and acting credits.

JANET L. MEYER lives in Apple Valley, California.

Hardcover – 236 pp., index – Dimensions 23,5 x 15 cm (9,3 x 5,9 inch) – Weight 495 g (17,5 oz) – PUBLISHER McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, Jefferson, North Carolina, 1998 – ISBN 0-7864-0486-8